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Old 02-03-2020, 08:16 AM   #1
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Post Pizza dough

So i was able to find a different kind of flour thank god with a higher protein
Nutritional value is
Energy[calories]=361
proteins[gr]=-12.0
Carbohydrates[gr]=76
Fats[gr]=12.5
Dietary Fibre[gr]=1.9
Sodium[mg]=7.9


My question is how much flour/water/yeast/salt/sugar/oil etc etc to use exactly?

And please note i won't be using a pizza stone and i'm okey with that, ill be using a normal oven plate not sure what it's called.


P.S it's a 100% whole wheat flour [Milled from the whole wheat kernel] whatever this means in [].


Thanks in advance for the help. :)

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Old 02-03-2020, 01:29 PM   #2
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first please realize that using "whole grain" flours is going to precipitate a whole raft of issues you'll need to overcome. it clan be done, but it may take some experimenting.


"standard" recipes will not work with whole grains because whole grain aka whole wheat absorbs water differently, the coarse edges of the husk/fibre slice up the tiny bubbles made by the yeast - and then it does not rise as expected. many many recipes using whole grain are 1/3 whole grain + 2/3 white flour.

the high gluten flour you're looking for, in UK, is "strong flour"
here is my "one crust" recipe, scaled down from Jamie Oliver's "feed the entire school" size....
165 g strong flour
115 g semolina
5 ml yeast (1 teaspoon)
2.5 ml kosher salt (1/2 teaspoon)
60 ml olive oil - optional, omit for max crispness
148 g hot water - temp you can hold your hand in; too hot=killed yeast.

that is only a starting point. every brand of flour will hydrate differently and you will without question need to adapt - that doubled when using whole grain flour.

good luck - take notes so you can "improve" next try.
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:05 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
first please realize that using "whole grain" flours is going to precipitate a whole raft of issues you'll need to overcome. it clan be done, but it may take some experimenting.


"standard" recipes will not work with whole grains because whole grain aka whole wheat absorbs water differently, the coarse edges of the husk/fibre slice up the tiny bubbles made by the yeast - and then it does not rise as expected. many many recipes using whole grain are 1/3 whole grain + 2/3 white flour.

the high gluten flour you're looking for, in UK, is "strong flour"
here is my "one crust" recipe, scaled down from Jamie Oliver's "feed the entire school" size....
165 g strong flour
115 g semolina
5 ml yeast (1 teaspoon)
2.5 ml kosher salt (1/2 teaspoon)
60 ml olive oil - optional, omit for max crispness
148 g hot water - temp you can hold your hand in; too hot=killed yeast.

that is only a starting point. every brand of flour will hydrate differently and you will without question need to adapt - that doubled when using whole grain flour.

good luck - take notes so you can "improve" next try.
I also have [wheat flour white bright] it's 10% protein however. whats your intake on this
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:15 PM   #4
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my bet is the 10% flour will work just fine.
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:17 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
my bet is the 10% flour will work just fine.
Question is it supposed to tear easily? when i make the pizza dough?[without letting it sit]
I have tried multiple times i never was able to get it to be stretchy as it's supposed to be without tearing
Someone suggested i use fresh yeast and use warm water which i have yet to test.
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Old 02-03-2020, 03:06 PM   #6
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what are you doing that makes it tear?
the most elastic dough on the planet can be "torn"
what do you mean "let it sit"
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Old 02-03-2020, 03:21 PM   #7
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Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
what are you doing that makes it tear?
the most elastic dough on the planet can be "torn"
what do you mean "let it sit"
By sit i mean cover it up and let it sit for an hour or more because of the yeast,and it tears even when it's thick i saw so many recipes/videos where the dough can at least be made thin without tearing but mine is a bit thick and tears
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Old 02-03-2020, 03:48 PM   #8
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Gluten development promotes stretchability. Kneading the dough promotes gluten development.

Higher protein flours develop more gluten.
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Old 02-03-2020, 04:21 PM   #9
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how are you "making it thin" that results in tearing the dough?
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