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Old 05-03-2021, 05:29 PM   #1
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The best French Toast ever

All French Toast is bread pudding, so why not start with bread pudding? That's how I make my French Toast: Bake your bread pudding in a bread tin then when cool slice and fry in butter or ghee. (I made a video of it if you'd like to see my process.)




Here's my recipe. I'd love to hear what you think -- and if you like French Toast as much as I do. :)


The proportions, so you can adjust the recipe, are 1 egg to 1 cup liquid to 1 cup dried/stale bread.



For my loaf tin I use
- 5 large eggs
- 5 cups milk (you can substitute cream for a richer pudding)
- 1/4 cup brandy (any flavored liquid like, liquors work well to personalize the flavor)
- 1/2 cup sugar (you can add up to 1.5 cups depending on how sweet you like it, because I pour syrup over it, I use less).
- The zests from 2 - 3 oranges (you can use lemons as well)
- Pinch of salt
- 1 tablespoon vanilla
- You can also mix in candied or dried fruits and/or nuts to suit your taste.
- 5 cups stale/dried bread

1. Zest oranges and add to sugar, then combine with 2 cups of milk and bring to the simmer. Turn off the heat and let sit until cool.

2. In a bowl whisk together five eggs, the salt, and any additional sugar you would like to use. Whisk in the orange flavored milk, the remaining 3 cups of milk, and all the flavorings. Strain to remove any solids.

3. In a bread tin lay out your dried bread (and fruits or nuts, if using) and then pour the liquid mixture over it. Let it sit overnight to fully rehydrate the bread.

4. Bake in a slow oven, 160C/320F for one hour. Let cool and refrigerate. Serve as is or with a sweet sauce, -- at this point you've made Bread Pudding, to make French toast, slice the pudding and fry in hot oil or ghee for a few minutes on either side to develop a crust. The outside is crispy and the inside warm and creamy).

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Old 05-03-2021, 06:14 PM   #2
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First, your recipe looks great. I do have to say though that french toast can be so much more than bread pudding. French toast, made with bread slices, either thick, or thin, can be stuffed with everything from processed cheese loaf to corned beef. It can battered and deep fried to make a Monty Kristo, or a fruit stuffed french toast. You can flavor it with nutmeg to make it taste like a cake doughnut, or with S&P if you want something more savory. And of course, you can top it with nut butters, jams, jellies, lemon/lime curds, or maple, or fruit syrups
French toast is just too versatile to pigeonhole into one recipe. That's my take on it anyway.

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Old 05-03-2021, 06:55 PM   #3
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Wow, that looks terrific! Certainly for a special occasion it looks worth the effort!
Thanks for the post whole milk!
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Old 05-03-2021, 07:28 PM   #4
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In case I wasn't clear, your recipe looks great, and is a grand way of using left-over bread pudding.

Thanks.

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Old 05-04-2021, 02:50 PM   #5
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I like the Cooks Illustrated french toast recipe because it adds a little flour to the egg/milk/butter/sugar mixture. This makes a big difference in the taste/texture of the french toast. The other tip is to use Challah bread.
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Old 05-04-2021, 11:49 PM   #6
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Hi, whole milk. You might call that recipe bread pudding, but it's what I've been making as overnight French toast for years. I serve it hot out of the oven after baking it instead of cooling down and then slicing and frying.

I'm also confused with your egg-to-milk ratio, not to mention the additional liquid from the brandy. Nearly every overnight French bread recipe I've read uses one (or almost one) egg per one ounce of liquid - or eight eggs for one cup of milk. Rather than baking mine in a loaf tin, I use an 8x8x2 baking dish. About 2/3 loaf of bread, six eggs and a cup of whole milk fills the baking dish.

I do like the addition of brandy, though, and the orange zest. I might tweak my recipe to incorporate those into my next pan of overnight French toast.
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Old 05-05-2021, 05:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
First, your recipe looks great. I do have to say though that french toast can be so much more than bread pudding.
Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
You're a 1000 times right. I make a savory version I serve with gravy or a sauce, and when calories weren't an issue, would even bread slices to deep fry.
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Old 05-05-2021, 05:15 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bbqcoder View Post
I like the Cooks Illustrated french toast recipe because it adds a little flour to the egg/milk/butter/sugar mixture. This makes a big difference in the taste/texture of the french toast. The other tip is to use Challah bread.
Oh, that sounds interesting. When I make custard, I often, not always, add a bit of starch to protect it. Like, how much flour are you talking?
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Old 05-05-2021, 05:25 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
Hi, whole milk. You might call that recipe bread pudding, but it's what I've been making as overnight French toast for years. I serve it hot out of the oven after baking it instead of cooling down and then slicing and frying.

I'm also confused with your egg-to-milk ratio, not to mention the additional liquid from the brandy. Nearly every overnight French bread recipe I've read uses one (or almost one) egg per one ounce of liquid - or eight eggs for one cup of milk. Rather than baking mine in a loaf tin, I use an 8x8x2 baking dish. About 2/3 loaf of bread, six eggs and a cup of whole milk fills the baking dish.

I do like the addition of brandy, though, and the orange zest. I might tweak my recipe to incorporate those into my next pan of overnight French toast.
First, I've never baked FT before. I'll have to find a recipe and give it a try.

Eight eggs for one cup of milk? I've never heard of such a thing, at least not for a custard. In my minds eye, that plays out more like an omelette than a custard, so in that version of FT, I think the results would be very different. Come to think of it, that proportion of eggs to milk as a sweet item, like FT, reminds me of a section in Escoffier's cookbook on sweet omelettes, which, apparently, used to be a thing.

Brandy (or rum) are great additions. When I make if for my kids, I leave it out and the syrups add that extra flavor that suits them just fine. :)
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