"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Fish & Seafood
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-23-2016, 01:24 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Essex
Posts: 1
Cod Fillets Shrinkage

Hi, Can anyone suggest the best way (other than frying in batter!) to cook Cod Fillets? Whether I steam them or put them in foil in the oven they always end up half the size! Is there another way to avoid this?

Tinybot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2016, 04:35 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Kayelle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: south central coast/California
Posts: 14,745
Welcome Tinybot

You must be over cooking them.
__________________
Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but rather by the moments that take our breath away.

Kayelle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2016, 06:05 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Addie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: East Boston, MA
Posts: 22,365
Fresh cod filets have natural body fluids. But not enough to cause them to shrink. Some vendors will soak their products in water to add to the weight. They do it with scallops and lots of other sea products. When cooked this added water will cook off and cause shrinkage. My second husband was a professional fisherman. He always brought home fresh, caught in the last haul, fileted fish for the family. I never had a problem with shrinkage.

Welcome to DC. A fun place to be. Lots of laughter and information. Do please stick around and join in the fun. We would love to have you.
__________________
Illegitimi non carborundum!
I don't want my last words to be, "I wish I had spent more time doing housework"
Addie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2016, 06:10 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,696
Hi and welcome to Discuss Cooking

I agree with Kayelle. When proteins are cooked, their flesh tightens up; usually it's only a little, but if the heat is too high and the moisture is cooked out of the fish, it wiill shrink more. Most fish only needs to be cooked for 10 minutes or so, and not at extremely high temperatures.

How long are you cooking your fish?
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-23-2016, 07:58 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Aunt Bea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: near Mount Pilot
Posts: 7,551
I have the same problem when I use those 4 ounce frozen portions that come individually wrapped. I believe it is due to the addition of some type of liquid "solution". When I buy whole/natural fillets the shrinkage is negligible.
Aunt Bea is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 09:15 AM   #6
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by Addie View Post
Fresh cod filets have natural body fluids. But not enough to cause them to shrink. Some vendors will soak their products in water to add to the weight. They do it with scallops and lots of other sea products. When cooked this added water will cook off and cause shrinkage. My second husband was a professional fisherman. He always brought home fresh, caught in the last haul, fileted fish for the family. I never had a problem with shrinkage.

Welcome to DC. A fun place to be. Lots of laughter and information. Do please stick around and join in the fun. We would love to have you.
Ya fillets that have been caught by your friends/family aren't going to be put in 'food-safe' chemical baths which make the cell walls almost burst with as much water as they can absorb. This is a very common practise in the seafood industry. If the protein strands, any protein strands like in eggs, beef, chicken etc. are heated over 212 F the cells contract and squeeze out their water.
So when you are cooking any seafood always cook it very slowly and gently and never over 212F.
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 10:39 AM   #7
Master Chef
 
CraigC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 6,425
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
So when you are cooking any seafood always cook it very slowly and gently and never over 212F.
I don't think my cracked conch or conch fritters would work at that temperature, not to mention any other fried, roasted or grilled seafood.
__________________
Emeralds are real Gems! C. caninus and C. batesii.
CraigC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 10:48 AM   #8
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
I don't think my cracked conch or conch fritters would work at that temperature, not to mention any other fried, roasted or grilled seafood.
Of course not.
But you don't put grill a fresh prawn or a piece of fresh fish for ten minutes. It's one thing to give the seafood a quick sear. It's another thing to overcook the seafood. You know this of course.
Same thing as grilling/searing a steak for a few moments to seal in the juices. But you know this too don't you.
I KNOW you know what I'm referring to about overheating protein strands.
No need for the 'eye roll' Everyone here who posted said the member must be overcooking the fish.
All I posted was a suggestion not to heat the seafood beyond 212 F right?
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 11:04 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,696
You know that grilling/searing meat does not seal in juices, right? That old idea has been debunked again and again.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 11:21 AM   #10
Head Chef
 
Zagut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Friendship,MD.
Posts: 1,298
You didn't happen to keep your cod in the swimming pool.

Sorry couldn't help myself.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	67e4b3ddb2f38b93115edc07cbafe0cb.jpg
Views:	457
Size:	20.7 KB
ID:	24222  
Zagut is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2016, 12:11 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,399
I notice all the individually wrapped cod fillets do contain quite a bit of liquid.
I always drain and dry them for several hours in the fridge before cooking.
They rarely shrink more than a tiny bit.
I love cod because I cannot afford Halibut!......LOL
Roll_Bones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 08:32 AM   #12
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
You know that grilling/searing meat does not seal in juices, right? That old idea has been debunked again and again.
Whatever.
You're obviously wanting to go somewhere I do not.
PI
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 09:37 AM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,696
All I want is accurate information available to the readers of this site. I thought you wanted the same.

See #2 (everyone but puffin3):
http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/t...ing-steak.html
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 11:35 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
Whatever.
You're obviously wanting to go somewhere I do not.
PI
GG is correct. The science does not support the myth.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 12:58 PM   #15
Senior Cook
 
puffin3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Duncan
Posts: 481
Quote:
Originally Posted by RPCookin View Post
GG is correct. The science does not support the myth.
YA RIGHT!

Does Searing Meat Seal In Juices? - Part 2
I'll leave it there.
Tonight I'm 'searing' a nice rib eye steak. I prefer to keep the delicious juices inside the steak rather than on the plate. Tens of thousands of 'Steak Houses' haven't been listening to the 'debunkers'. HAAA HAAAA!
puffin3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-25-2016, 01:20 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,696
Quote:
Originally Posted by puffin3 View Post
YA RIGHT!

Does Searing Meat Seal In Juices? - Part 2
I'll leave it there.
Tonight I'm 'searing' a nice rib eye steak. I prefer to keep the delicious juices inside the steak rather than on the plate. Tens of thousands of 'Steak Houses' haven't been listening to the 'debunkers'. HAAA HAAAA!
You know as well as the rest of us that steak houses cook have different equipment than home cooks and what applies to them doesn't apply to us.

I guess I have to put this here:

Quote from 7 Old Wives' Tales About Cooking Steak That Need To Go Away | Serious Eats

Quote:
The Reality: Searing produces no such barrier—liquid can still pass freely in and out of the surface of a seared steak. To prove this, I cooked two steaks to the exact same internal temperature (130°F). One steak I seared first over hot coals and finished over the cooler side of the grill. The second steak I started on the cooler side, let it come to about ten degrees below its final target temperature, then finished it by giving it a sear over the hot side of a grill. If there is any truth to the searing story, then the steak that was seared first should retain more moisture.

What I found is actually the exact opposite: the steak that is cooked gently first and finished with a sear will not only develop a deeper, darker crust (due to slightly drier outer layers—see Myth #1), but it also cooks more evenly from center to edge, thus limiting the amount of overcooked meat and producing a finished product that is juicier and more flavorful.

The Takeaway: When cooking thick steaks, start them on the cooler side of the grill and cook with the lid on until they reach about ten degrees below final serving temperature. Finish them off on the hot side of the grill for a great crust. For thinner steaks (about an inch or less), just cook them over the hot side the entire time—they'll be cooked to medium rare by the time a good crust has developed.
Your guy should pay more attention to what the debunkers actually do, rather than what he imagines they do. Kenji Lopez-Alt is a former test cook for Cooks Illustrated. He knows how to conduct a proper scientific experiment, unlike the guy at about.com, who also has stupid things to say about wooden cutting boards. Not Reliable.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cod fillets, other

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:12 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.