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Old 06-04-2019, 09:31 AM   #1
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Mildest Fish

Those trout I caught last Saturday beckoned to me this morning They were cleaned and ready to cook. I lined a baking pan with aluminum foil, dried the fish, inside and out with paper towels, Drizzled with olive oil, making sure t rub it all over the fish, and lightly seasoned with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Pop the fish into a 425' F. convection oven for 20 minutes. The fish was cooked perfectly. Was so looking forward to my first bit. The texture was great, the fish was very moist and tender, and the flavor was so mild as I cold barely taste it. This was trout that had been recently planted in the lake where I caught them. The flesh was white, rather than the glorious ping/orange of wild trout,and little of that trout flavor that I love. All in all, it was edible. For those that like very mild fish, this would have been perfect, all of the protien, with no fishy flavor. I want some wild brookies, with the fless stained orange by the beta-carotene in the scuds and freshwater shrimp they eat. And I want a new, younger body that will allow me to walk a stream and catch them.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

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Old 06-04-2019, 11:03 AM   #2
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That must have been a bit disappointing. I am not a fan of overly mild fish. I wouldn't mind having a younger body either.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:38 PM   #3
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My experience with trout is that it has a pretty strong fish taste to it. Mild tasting trout sounds good to me.

My body can still fish, but I lack the patience for fishing. Well, I do like offshore fishing, but my wallet lacks the funds for that.

CD
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Old 06-05-2019, 08:02 PM   #4
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My experience with trout is that it has a pretty strong fish taste to it. Mild tasting trout sounds good to me.

My body can still fish, but I lack the patience for fishing. Well, I do like offshore fishing, but my wallet lacks the funds for that.
Same here. Reddish pink flesh. Not real fishy. But still on the gamey side.

Offshore is my dream. Onshore is my dream. If there's water, there's people and bars......lol Fish too!
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Old 06-05-2019, 08:58 PM   #5
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Same here. Reddish pink flesh. Not real fishy. But still on the gamey side.

Offshore is my dream. Onshore is my dream. If there's water, there's people and bars......lol Fish too!
We used to go out for three days at a time to the oil rigs, to fish for red snapper. It was a 42 foot boat, and the owner would burn through a couple hundred gallons of diesel.

I caught my first (and last) big shark on one of those trips. I fought that thing for a good hour, or more. I got it up to the boat, and cut it loose. Big sharks are not good eats. It is one of those things you do just to say you did it.

I love red snapper. It is without a doubt my favorite fish to eat.

One thing you need to know if you go offshore fishing for three days, is that when you get back on dry land, you walk around like a drunk. Your body is so used to the pitching and rocking of the boat, that you can't walk right for a while. I took a shower, and had to hold onto the walls.

CD
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Old 06-05-2019, 09:06 PM   #6
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On the topic of sharks, the small ones have the best meat.

A friend of mine caught these from the beach. We cut them into steaks, and grilled them.

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Old 06-06-2019, 07:00 AM   #7
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Sharks urinate through their flesh. No thanks. I've been on 3 day fishing trips, but the fishing was done underwater with a gun.

The "mildest fish" depends on what you have access to. Here hogfish is probably the mildest, saltwater of course.
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Old 06-06-2019, 07:34 AM   #8
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Skates are related to sharks. I know that when very fresh, the meat is very similar to scallops in both texture and flavor. However, the meat quickly begins to degrade, and develops an ammonia smell and flavor. If I recall from biology class, urine goes through a chemical metamorphosis and becomes ammonia in nature, part of the ammonia cycle.

Craig C, this lends credibility to your statement about sharks. I[ve only heard of people eating shark fins.

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Old 06-06-2019, 01:42 PM   #9
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We used to go out for three days at a time to the oil rigs, to fish for red snapper. It was a 42 foot boat, and the owner would burn through a couple hundred gallons of diesel.

I caught my first (and last) big shark on one of those trips. I fought that thing for a good hour, or more. I got it up to the boat, and cut it loose. Big sharks are not good eats. It is one of those things you do just to say you did it.

I love red snapper. It is without a doubt my favorite fish to eat.

One thing you need to know if you go offshore fishing for three days, is that when you get back on dry land, you walk around like a drunk. Your body is so used to the pitching and rocking of the boat, that you can't walk right for a while. I took a shower, and had to hold onto the walls.

CD
Lessee here. A couple of hundred gallons of diesel at marina prices. Bait. Food. Oh, and three days worth of beer! So just how much did that fish cost?
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Old 06-06-2019, 02:15 PM   #10
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Lessee here. A couple of hundred gallons of diesel at marina prices. Bait. Food. Oh, and three days worth of beer! So just how much did that fish cost?
The boat owner was my neighbor. I would go out fishing with him and his son, who was my age (around 16). His son died in a car accident right out of high school.

Soooo, in this particular instance, those fishing trips were priceless.

CD
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Old 06-10-2019, 02:47 AM   #11
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Sounds like you caught a farm raised trout. They are fed a totally different feed from what they can catch on their own when released in the wild. Had the fish had a chance to eat wild for a time, it would have developed the flavor and taste that you enjoy.

I went fishing with a friend once and he kept catching small ones. He was a devoted Catch and Release fisherman when it came to small ones.

Then he got mad because my first catch was a huge one. I don't remember what it was I caught, but I gave it to him to take home. Told him he could tell everyone he caught it and I would never tell. I have kept my word until just now.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:18 AM   #12
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Sounds like you caught a farm raised trout. They are fed a totally different feed from what they can catch on their own when released in the wild. Had the fish had a chance to eat wild for a time, it would have developed the flavor and taste that you enjoy.
Farm-raised trout are not found in rivers. I doubt the Chief was fishing in a fish farm.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:37 AM   #13
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Farm-raised trout are not found in rivers. I doubt the Chief was fishing in a fish farm.
Umm, they do spawn, hatch, raise to a certain size fish in farms, then release them into bodies of water to increase the population.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:48 AM   #14
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Umm, they do spawn, hatch, raise to a certain size fish in farms, then release them into bodies of water to increase the population.
Since they spend most of their lives in the wild - especially if they've reached the size for a legal catch - I wouldn't classify them as farm-raised. The general understanding of the term is that the fish are raised entirely in a controlled environment.
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Old 06-10-2019, 10:51 AM   #15
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Those trout I caught last Saturday beckoned to me this morning... This was trout that had been recently planted in the lake where I caught them. The flesh was white, rather than the glorious ping/orange of wild trout,and little of that trout flavor that I love.
Looking back at the original post, I was mistaken about the origin of the fish. Sorry about that. Ya learn something new every day
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Old 06-10-2019, 11:54 AM   #16
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Looking back at the original post, I was mistaken about the origin of the fish. Sorry about that. Ya learn something new every day
Don't confuse hatchery raised fish that are hatched, reared through the early stages of life then released into the wild with farmed fish.
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Old 06-10-2019, 12:06 PM   #17
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Don't confuse hatchery raised fish that are hatched, reared through the early stages of life then released into the wild with farmed fish.
I know the difference - I just didn't realize that the former was the one the Chief was talking about.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:09 PM   #18
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Umm, they do spawn, hatch, raise to a certain size fish in farms, then release them into bodies of water to increase the population.
Thank you medtran. That's what they do here in Mass. The whole purpose of the fish farms are to restock the rivers and inlet areas with new fish.

They are not raised for the sole purpose of restocking supermarkets. You do have to wonder sometimes where folks get their information from.

Restocking rivers and lakes has been in practice for many years now and very successful. Many endangered species have made a miracle comeback from possible extinction.
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:12 PM   #19
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To Chief.

Sorry love, but once your body tells you that you have to passed your teenage years, there is no going back. At 80 years I have found that out the hard way. Now my kids are rooting for me to reach 90. GIVE ME A BREAK KIDS!
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Old 06-10-2019, 01:22 PM   #20
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They are not raised for the sole purpose of restocking supermarkets. You do have to wonder sometimes where folks get their information from.
"Some folks" get their information from all sorts of sources. Aquaculture has been a large and growing industry for many years.

Fish Farming Market by Environment (Freshwater, Marine Water, and Brackish Water) and Fish Type (Fin Fish and Others): Global Opportunity Analysis and Industry Forecast, 2018 - 2025
Quote:
The global fish farming market size was valued at $257,936 million in 2017, and is expected to reach $376,485 million by 2025, growing at a CAGR of 4.77% from 2018 to 2025. Fish farming deals with the farming, breeding, rearing, and harvesting of aquatic organisms, animals, and plants, which include fish farming, carps, mollusks, crustaceans, and aquatic plants in all types of water environments.
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extra virgin olive oil, fish, pepper, rainbow trout, recipe, salt

Mildest Fish Those trout I caught last Saturday beckoned to me this morning They were cleaned and ready to cook. I lined a baking pan with aluminum foil, dried the fish, inside and out with paper towels, Drizzled with olive oil, making sure t rub it all over the fish, and lightly seasoned with salt and fresh ground black pepper. Pop the fish into a 425' F. convection oven for 20 minutes. The fish was cooked perfectly. Was so looking forward to my first bit. The texture was great, the fish was very moist and tender, and the flavor was so mild as I cold barely taste it. This was trout that had been recently planted in the lake where I caught them. The flesh was white, rather than the glorious ping/orange of wild trout,and little of that trout flavor that I love. All in all, it was edible. For those that like very mild fish, this would have been perfect, all of the protien, with no fishy flavor. I want some wild brookies, with the fless stained orange by the beta-carotene in the scuds and freshwater shrimp they eat. And I want a new, younger body that will allow me to walk a stream and catch them.:ohmy: Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North 3 stars 1 reviews
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