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Old 12-09-2008, 01:07 AM   #1
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My frustration with fish

Fish is great, I really enjoy eating it. But there's a reason I don't make it.

Everyone knows it is really hard to cook for 1. I plan for 3 or 4 days of food when I cook. And this is why I don't make it. Fish doesn't seem to re-warm very well. At least this is my experience.

Can anyone offer suggestions on how fish can be re-warmed?

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Old 12-09-2008, 01:11 AM   #2
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Don't know about warming them back up, but it does sound like you could benefit from a Food Saver. Then you could separate out any meats you have into individual portions and freeze the ones you don't need right away.
As for warming, I have found the oven seems to do the best on cold meats you want to re-heat. I set it to 250 and let it warm up gradually, hoping it doesn't dry out in the process, LOL.
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Old 12-09-2008, 05:07 AM   #3
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Obviously, this would depend on your taste, but, I use leftover fish as snack food.

Other than that the foodsaver and pre portioning is a good idea.

I kind of like the handivac for this use though. I portion the food and put freezer between the portions. I can then open the bag, take out a portion, or portions, reclose and refreze.
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:18 AM   #4
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When you shop for your 4-5 days of planned meals, why can't you simply buy a single portion of fresh fish? No leftovers to worry about.

And if/when you do have leftovers, even the thinnest fish filets reheats beautifully without drying out in the microwave.
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:20 AM   #5
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I agree with Mav on the fish..... buy what you like, cut into portion sizes or seal single fillets, and cook for dinner. No need to reheat! :)

Rewarmed fish IMO is just really not worth it. And if you have to rewarm it, I would think wrapping it in foil and tossing in a 350 oven for a bit would work.
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:29 AM   #6
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I cooked two orange roughy filets just this past summer, instead of the usual one. After asking the same thing here that you did, because I have never reheated fish, the second one did indeed heat up just fine in the microwave, on a dinner plate covered with plastic wrap that I poked a couple holes in. I should mention though that these filets were grilled, not breaded. And orange roughy has a pretty good texture to it anyway. If your fish is breaded you might want to use the oven.
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Old 12-09-2008, 10:39 AM   #7
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if you want to reheat fish, pizza, and meats--even french fries to bring back crispiness, heat your oven and baking stone to 400-425 F (have the stone on the bottom rack and place these items on the heated up stone and bake for about 3-7 minutes--just check as it doesn't take long) far better than using the microwave which tends ( at least for pizza) to make them mushy......well, it works for me.....
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Old 12-09-2008, 11:46 AM   #8
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Buy smaller pieces or smaller fish like trout and freeze what you don't use right away. Larger filets can be cut into single portions, wrapped and frozen seperately.

Plan ahead and defrost them in the fridge overnight. I usually cook for two, and fish is the absolute easiest to prepare. Thae hardest thing is coming up with a side dish.

If you like shrimp, I found those large frozen shrimp bags very convienient. For one, I can find US Gulf shrimp frozen. Take what you need from the bag and close it back up. Shrimp defrost in no time under cold running water. Saute a few in garlic oil for a quick and tasty compliment to a steak.
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Old 12-09-2008, 11:57 AM   #9
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One thing that's extremely important to keep in mind is that you can't just arbitrarily freeze fish unless you know for sure that it wasn't frozen before. Many MANY varieties of fish these days are cleaned & flash-frozen on board ship, & then thawed before being placed in seafood display cases. Even if the sign says "fresh", always ask to see if, in fact, the fish has been frozen before.

Refreezing previously frozen & thawed raw fish results in something that I would not want to eat - poor flavor, mushy texture, yuck all round.
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Old 12-09-2008, 12:17 PM   #10
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I don't see what the problem is with making just one piece of fissh. it cooks so fast it is almost as much time to warm up something as to cook a single serving of fish.
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Old 12-09-2008, 12:18 PM   #11
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An off topic question. I did not think refreezing fish was a problem. Or so I was told. Am I wrong, is fish is as bad as meat?
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Old 12-09-2008, 12:44 PM   #12
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i actually find fish easier to cook for 1... its so dang expensive just one portion means I can buy quality... my biggest problem with fish is shopping for it most of the quality fish markets are a bit out of the way of have bad hours. Someone just opened up a fancy eco sensitive fishmarket that I pass on my way home though so I am going to have to check it out... I will guess its expensive but it would be convenient.
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Old 12-09-2008, 01:36 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by BreezyCooking View Post
Refreezing previously frozen & thawed raw fish results in something that I would not want to eat - poor flavor, mushy texture, yuck all round.
I have had good results with firm white fish and salmon. If the fish looks real good at the store, I'll buy a bunch and freeze the filets or whatever seperately.
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Old 12-09-2008, 01:57 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbreit View Post
Fish is great, I really enjoy eating it. But there's a reason I don't make it.

Everyone knows it is really hard to cook for 1. I plan for 3 or 4 days of food when I cook. And this is why I don't make it. Fish doesn't seem to re-warm very well. At least this is my experience.

Can anyone offer suggestions on how fish can be re-warmed?
Who is the "Everyone" who knows it is hard to cook for one? I do it all the time. At least 4 times a week. Fish is just about the easiest thing to fix for one. you just buy ONE fillet! Sprinkle it with some herbs, salt and pepper, and toss it into a hot skillet. Voila! You can make a little sauce with a dab of white wine, or cream, or both.... or enjoy it plain, or with a topping of a fruit vinegar, for a nonfat taste treat. A fish fillet takes no more than a couple of minutes to be cooked perfectly. Maybe 8 minutes if you're fixing a thick fillet like cod.

Fish doesn't reheat well, because it is so easily overcooked. So why reheat it?" just cook as many fillets as you think you'll eat for the one meal.

I think leftover fish fillets make great sandwiches for lunch the next day.
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Old 12-09-2008, 03:03 PM   #15
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Leftover fish? Chowder, croquettes, stirfry, pilaf, gumbo...I also cook for one, and like fish. Leftover fish with red bell pepper and artichoke heart or asparagus is nice in an omelet or a fritatta. I've even used leftover fish on my pesto and goat cheese pizza.
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Old 12-15-2008, 11:35 AM   #16
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An off topic question. I did not think refreezing fish was a problem. Or so I was told. Am I wrong, is fish is as bad as meat?
I formerly owned a large seafood restaurant in Florida and have a lot of experience handling and storing seafood. Theoretically, home re-freezing of FAS (frozen at sea) or other commercially flash frozen seafood (such as tilapia or farm-raised catfish) shouldn't be a problem. It's flash frozen very soon after being caught and is probably "fresher" than most "never frozen" fresh fish you'll find in the typical supermarket.

However, the potential problem occurs at the retail level. To preserve freshness and inhibit growth of bacteria, the flash-frozen fish much be defrosted and kept at temperatures below 40 degrees (preferably as close to 32 degrees as possible) at all times, and must be kept by the consumer at these temperatures as well until cooked or re-frozen.

If you are going to portion and freeze it, it should be done as soon as possible.

The single best test for freshness is the nose test. If it smelly fishy, it's not fresh. Also, I personally never buy seafood from any market that smells overly fishy. This is a sure sign of lax sanitation and/or improper food handling standards.

There are some great factsheets from the University of Delaware Sea Grant Program: Untitled Document. I highly recommend them.
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Old 12-15-2008, 04:28 PM   #17
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My personal experience has been that refreezing previously frozen fish does immeasurable damage to the texture - especially mild white fish filets like sole, etc. They turn to mush. The only way I'd use them this way would be in a chowder or something like that.
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Old 12-17-2008, 07:17 AM   #18
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I freeze fish maximum for 2 days.. Later they won't remain fresh. So its better to purchase only the amount we can eat within 2 days.
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Old 12-17-2008, 08:28 AM   #19
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I freeze fish maximum for 2 days.. Later they won't remain fresh. So its better to purchase only the amount we can eat within 2 days.
Sorry, Jenny, but I respectfully disagree with 2 day freezing. Obviously, it's better to buy only what you need and not refreeze at all, but whatever damage is done to the texture and fresh flavor by refreezing occurs in the freezing and defrosting process, not by the time spent in the freezer (within limits). If the fish is properly wrapped and frozen, there will be no detectable loss of quality for several weeks.

I always try to use frozen fish as soon as possible, and certainly within a month or two, but freezing fish for a day or two just doesn't make sense in my opinion because it will inevitably loose SOME quality by being frozen and defrosted.

If you are going to use the fish within a couple or three days, it's much better to store it unfrozen in your refrigerator, in sealed ziplock bags placed in a container of ice to keep the temperature close to 32 degrees.
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Old 12-17-2008, 09:22 AM   #20
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I fully agree with FincaPerlitas here. There's absolutely no logical reason to freeze fish for 2 days. If you're going to consume the fish within 48 hours, just keep it wrapped on ice (or ice packs) in your fridge. The taste & texture will be MUCH better than if you froze & defrosted it.
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