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Old 01-22-2018, 12:53 PM   #21
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picture of a shrimpAttachment 28934
AKA Prawn in UK. Over here Shrimp are smaller but look the same.

(Incidentally, neither are red until cooked.)
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Old 01-22-2018, 02:01 PM   #22
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And in Sweden we just call them räka...
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Old 01-22-2018, 02:43 PM   #23
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Then there is "scampi". That's an Italian word for "shrimp", so saying you are having shrimp scampi is the same as saying your are having shrimp shrimp.
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Old 01-22-2018, 06:36 PM   #24
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AKA Prawn in UK. Over here Shrimp are smaller but look the same.

(Incidentally, neither are red until cooked.)
Shrimp caught in different waters are different colors. In the Eastern Gulf, East of the Mississippi River, the shrimp are a reddish color. West of the Mississippi, they are grey/brown. It is because of the silt from the Mississippi River, which drifts to the West when it hits the Gulf of Mexico.

Prawns... don't live in the Gulf of Mexico, since they are fresh-water crustaceans.

Oh, and the "H" in Herb is silent.

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Old 01-23-2018, 12:27 AM   #25
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So...do prawns have a similar flavor and texture to shrimp? I don't think I've ever eaten prawns (grilled at least).
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Old 01-23-2018, 02:51 AM   #26
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So...do prawns have a similar flavor and texture to shrimp? I don't think I've ever eaten prawns (grilled at least).
Yes, they do. Anything you can cook with shrimp, you can cook with prawns. Even though they are different animals, they have very similar taste and texture. That is probably why there is so much confusion about shrimp and prawns.

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Old 01-23-2018, 07:00 AM   #27
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Then there is "scampi". That's an Italian word for "shrimp", so saying you are having shrimp scampi is the same as saying your are having shrimp shrimp.
Shrimp shrimp must be small shrimp, as opposed to jumbo shrimp.
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Old 01-23-2018, 09:28 AM   #28
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Yes, they do. Anything you can cook with shrimp, you can cook with prawns. Even though they are different animals, they have very similar taste and texture. That is probably why there is so much confusion about shrimp and prawns.

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Casey - I don't know if you read all of the Wiki references, but prawns and shrimp ARE the same thing, just by different names in different regions.

Essentially, prawns are just shrimp with a high opinion of themselves.
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Old 01-23-2018, 10:11 AM   #29
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I went into a fish monger's place in Florida on the coast. Was buying some shrimp for supper. the display case was amazing in the different shrimps,etc available.

I saw some that were quite large and very pink and asked what was the best way to re-heat them... she looked a little shocked and said

"oh my dear, these are raw not cooked!" I was so thankful I had asked!

Couldn't imagine what my face would have looked like had I bitten into a raw shrimp!



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Old 01-23-2018, 10:29 AM   #30
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Scampi Shrimp reminds me of a favourite Florida restaurant my husband and I would visit on our trips just to have that dish.

For several years we couldn't manage a visit and when we finally did... we had only shrimp in the dish. We called the server and asked about it, the manager came and explained to us that it was the sauce that was being referred to.

We mentioned that we had had this dish many times there and it definitely had both... so he became vague saying that during his time there (3 years) the recipe hadn't changed. Well, due to the time line we could hardly prove it but accepted the change.

The following year while cleaning out a corner in my basement came across a menu we had brought home from there back in the day...

Sure enough! the menu described the dish as having both scampi and shrimp in a garlic (and something) sauce!

So the dish, in my mind, originally was created with both. Due either to availability, appreciation, costs or 'whatever'! it was changed.
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Old 01-23-2018, 05:31 PM   #31
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
I went into a fish monger's place in Florida on the coast. Was buying some shrimp for supper. the display case was amazing in the different shrimps,etc available.

I saw some that were quite large and very pink and asked what was the best way to re-heat them... she looked a little shocked and said

"oh my dear, these are raw not cooked!" I was so thankful I had asked!

Couldn't imagine what my face would have looked like had I bitten into a raw shrimp!



I
Amaebi, raw shrimp for sashimi or sushi, is a delicacy available around January and February here. The texture is kinda like very firm snot, but they are sweet and tasty.
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Old 01-23-2018, 06:14 PM   #32
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Casey - I don't know if you read all of the Wiki references, but prawns and shrimp ARE the same thing, just by different names in different regions.

Essentially, prawns are just shrimp with a high opinion of themselves.
Both shrimp and prawns are Decapod crustaceans, meaning they both have ten legs and possess external skeletons. However, that’s where their classification similarities end. Shrimp belong to the sub-order Pleocyemata, while prawns belong to the sub-order Dendrobranchiata. - Food & Wine

Scientifically, they are not the same animal.

Prawns have branching gills, claws on three pairs of their legs and second pincers that are larger than their front ones. Additionally, prawns lack the distinct bend in their bodies that is seen with shrimp and each of their body segments overlaps the one behind it in succession.

Shrimp, on the other hand, have lamellar (or plate-like) gills, and claws on two pairs of their legs. Their front pincers are typically their largest. Additionally, shrimp have a distinct bend in their bodies and their second segments overlap the first and third segments.
- Food & Wine

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Old 01-23-2018, 11:53 PM   #33
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Both shrimp and prawns are Decapod crustaceans, meaning they both have ten legs and possess external skeletons. However, that’s where their classification similarities end. Shrimp belong to the sub-order Pleocyemata, while prawns belong to the sub-order Dendrobranchiata. - Food & Wine

Scientifically, they are not the same animal.

Prawns have branching gills, claws on three pairs of their legs and second pincers that are larger than their front ones. Additionally, prawns lack the distinct bend in their bodies that is seen with shrimp and each of their body segments overlaps the one behind it in succession.

Shrimp, on the other hand, have lamellar (or plate-like) gills, and claws on two pairs of their legs. Their front pincers are typically their largest. Additionally, shrimp have a distinct bend in their bodies and their second segments overlap the first and third segments.
- Food & Wine

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Since when is Food And Wine a scientific treatise? Then too, they don't speak for the whole world. If you Google "shrimp" and "prawn" you will get a lot of the same pictures. Wikipedia even says that there is no science behind the two names - they are both used colloquially and interchangeably to refer to the same group of edible critters. I found no credible reference that could make a definite statement as to which is which.
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Old 01-24-2018, 12:06 AM   #34
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I found no credible reference that could make a definite statement as to which is which.
Shrimp belong to the sub-order Pleocyemata, while prawns belong to the sub-order Dendrobranchiata. That seems pretty definitive to me. But who am I to argue with a Google search? Especially if they show a lot of pictures.

Pork Roll and Taylor Ham are two names for the same thing, and people argue over that. Here, we have two different actual scientific names for shrimp and prawns, and people still argue over it.

I give up. Everyone can believe what they want to believe.

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Old 01-24-2018, 01:51 AM   #35
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Räkor.. For ones Swedish is simple. It is räkor unless it is humrar, kräftor eller krabbor.
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Old 01-24-2018, 03:16 AM   #36
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Shrimp belong to the sub-order Pleocyemata, while prawns belong to the sub-order Dendrobranchiata. That seems pretty definitive to me. But who am I to argue with a Google search? Especially if they show a lot of pictures.

Pork Roll and Taylor Ham are two names for the same thing, and people argue over that. Here, we have two different actual scientific names for shrimp and prawns, and people still argue over it.

I give up. Everyone can believe what they want to believe.

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You are assigning colloquial identifiers to the scientific names based on what was printed in a foodie magazine. While Wikipedia has been known to be wrong about some things, they agree with most every other source that the 2 terms cannot be assigned to the scientific classification.

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The term "prawn"[2] is used particularly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Commonwealth nations, for large swimming crustaceans or shrimp, especially those with commercial significance in the fishing industry. Shrimp that fall in this category often belong to the suborder Dendrobranchiata. In North America, the term is used less frequently, typically for freshwater shrimp. The terms shrimp and prawn themselves lack scientific standing. Over the years, the way shrimp and prawn are used has changed, and nowadays the terms are almost interchangeable.

In the United Kingdom, prawn is used more commonly on menus than shrimp, while the opposite is the case in the United States. The term prawn also loosely describes any large shrimp, especially those at 15 (or fewer) to the pound[citation needed] (such as king prawns or jumbo shrimp).
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Old 01-24-2018, 03:32 AM   #37
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You are assigning colloquial identifiers to the scientific names based on what was printed in a foodie magazine. While Wikipedia has been known to be wrong about some things, they agree with most every other source that the 2 terms cannot be assigned to the scientific classification.
I'm not sure what part of "I give up" is hard to understand. I know when I'm better off talking to my dog, and I got there hours ago.

This is an argument that is just not worth having.

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Old 01-24-2018, 06:18 AM   #38
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It's Taylor Ham!

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Old 01-24-2018, 01:53 PM   #39
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It's Taylor Ham!



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Old 01-25-2018, 09:57 AM   #40
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Hi from Italy.
I have a curiosity.
In italian shrimp mean...shrimp and scampi mean langoustines, but I see many american recipes called "shrimp scampi" where only shrimps are used. So I'm curious to understand what is intended in usa with the word scampi, considering that scampi is an italian word (the plural of scampo to be precise) to indentify langoustines, but it seems that in usa identifies something else.
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