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Old 09-15-2006, 04:09 AM   #41
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Continued ...

And here are sardines or "sardelles" in Greek. The body is broader and flatter, but they're a similar length (sardines are usually a bit longer). Both fish are silver and smooth -- it's the body shape that immediately differentiates them.

The photo on the grill shows the type of rack you need to grill these over charcoal. This is where larger sardines are easier than smaller since even despite being placed perpendicular to the cross wires you can lose a few into the coals if they're small!

I'm hungry and it's not even noon ...

Recipes to follow.
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Old 09-15-2006, 05:18 AM   #42
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Sounds like Ayrton will be able to give you a recipe to do them at home, Kadesma. They're not difficult and taste fantastic. If you can find the fresh fish, they'll work out much cheaper.
Happily, as I second everything Snoop Puss has said: they're easy, cheap, and yummy!

And, as I was driving at with the photos -- these recipes work for either fresh anchovies or fresh sardines, the only difference being how the difference in the girth of each type of fish would affect its dehydration in the salt.

Behead and gut the fish under running cold water then drain. For anchovies you'd probably want to keep the fish whole with its spine whereas for the larger sardines you'd want to fillet the fish but that's not a hard and fast rule. The less the dehydration from salt, however, the more tender the final result.

Pack the cleaned fish into a container in layers of neat rows, alternating each layer with plenty of coarse salt. Cover and leave either (1) overnight or, (2) for three nights, the latter giving a saltier end product with more "bite" which is actually more desirable sometimes. The saltier version is most appropriate for the below recipe.

For the first dish I'm thinking of (this most likely being a bit different than what you saw, Kadesma), you would then remove the fish one by one from the salt, shaking/rubbing off as much salt as you can, then plunking them into a bowl in which you have an appropriate amount of vinegar (enough so that they can wade if not quite swim ...). Once all have been dunked in the vinegar, pull them out one by one, this time shaking off the vinegar, and put them into a fresh container and cover with olive oil. They're then ready to eat and will keep quite awhile (or so I'd imagine -- they don't last long in our house so it's hard for me to advise on this!). We keep ours in the fridge.

With the above recipe you could fillet the fish as you transfer them from the salt to the vinegar, or you could leave the spine in to be removed when they're eaten. It's up to you. IMHO, the very nicest, most luxurious preparation would be with the spine removed.

The "white-fillet" variation would be similar, however, I think you'd want to do the one-night salting as the tenderness of the fish is part of what's so lovely.

Prepare the fish as above up to and including the packing in salt but leave only for one night. Rinse the salt off under minimal cold running water and fillet, then place the filletted fish into neat rows in a fresh container. Shake off most of the water as you go.

Have ready an appropriate (to your taste) quantity of very thinly sliced onion, whole allspice berries, whole peppercorns, and a fair number of bay leaves. This time layer the fish with all of these ingredients interspersed fairly evenly among the little fishies. Cover with vinegar.

Kadesma, if you don't like these seasonings, you could make your own variation. These are wonderful, though, with the onions taking on a delicious crispness and crunch and the berries and the peppercorns softening to the point of being very edible should that appeal.

When it's time to serve these (again, keep in the fridge), fish a few out and drizzle some olive oil over them if you wish. As mentioned before, just superb with a small glass of straight vodka right from the freezer ...
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Old 09-15-2006, 06:55 AM   #43
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I picked up a tin of sardines in hot sauce (Bumblebee brand) last night. I have not had a chance to open them yet though. Once I do open them, how long will the keep in the fridge? I am guessing a day or two max right?
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:05 AM   #44
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In the fridge? In the liquid in which they came? Covered?

I'd say more like 3-6 ... at least.
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:25 AM   #45
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Oh OK cool. I should have opened them last night then just to taste one.
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:43 AM   #46
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GB - to be honest, one tin easily makes a decent portion - whether plain, or as a sandwich or salad - for one person.

Good, & good for you. I also disagree with removing the bones from tinned sardines. The bones are not only completely soft (in fact, I never even notice them), but are also the reason canned sardines (& canned salmon) are such a good source of calcium.
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:43 AM   #47
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GB, how big (heavy) is your can of sardines?
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:51 AM   #48
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Snoop Puss, this is what I got. The serving size (one serving per tin) is 106g.
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:51 AM   #49
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The bones are not only completely soft (in fact, I never even notice them), but are also the reason canned sardines (& canned salmon) are such a good source of calcium.
You know ... my mom tortured me growing up with canned salmon casserole, in which the individual vertabrae just grossed me out. I'm sure that's why I'm particularly sensitive to this issue!

Indeed, GB, they won't kill you and aren't all that nasty (she says generously) so if they're good for you, go for it. Better you than me .
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Old 09-15-2006, 07:54 AM   #50
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Well for my first try I will eat them bones and all. If I like them then great. If not, then I will take it from there
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:28 AM   #51
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I thought you might have one of the very big cans. I'll eat my hat if you can make a can of sardines last 3-6 days! You'll either love them, in which case you'll scoff them in a trice, or you'll hate them, in which case they'll go straight in the bin.

Personally I'm not a great fan of sardines canned in a spicy sauce or even in tomato sauce. I like them best in olive oil (oil drained off before serving, of course). And I love the tiny ones best of all.

Ayrton, I should have said earlier: ace photos. I just love them little fish.
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:32 AM   #52
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Yeah I had a hard time picking which kind to try first. I probably should have gone with just olive oil to start so I could really taste the flavor, but I lot hot things so I made a quick decision to go with that. I really hope I like these!
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:41 AM   #53
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Ayrton, I should have said earlier: ace photos. I just love them little fish.
Thanks Snoop Puss. Google image search comes through yet again!

GB? The spicy ones that come just with one or two wee little hot peppers are delish! Otherwise I'm with Snoop Puss ... the plainer the better.

Tomato sauce? Would avoid in a can, but if you ever get those fresh sardines, I've got a wicked recipe for them in a tomato sauce. And this from a person who generally hates the combo of fish and tomato ... or thought she did!

Bon apetite, by the way!
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Old 09-15-2006, 08:44 AM   #54
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If I find the fresh ones then I will take you up on that recipe as I feel the same way you do about fish and tomato together.
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Old 09-15-2006, 09:57 AM   #55
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I am a huge canned fish nut (anchovies, sardines herring, etc) but I really like sardines with mustard or piquant sauce rather than just in oil. Similarly, I prefer herring in sauce, as well. But I almost always eat the sardines on bread, rather than in a recipe.

Geebs, if you open the sardines and refrigerate them, make sure you seal them up really well or you might have to sleep on the couch.
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Old 09-15-2006, 10:01 AM   #56
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I might have to sleep on the couch just for bringing them into the house. DW asked why I got them. I told her I was really curious and wanted to try, then I asked her if she would try them. NO WAY she said. Why not? She said she won't eat anything with whiskers. HUH??? The she said, ya know like they used to show on Tom and Jerry. I was laughing so hard I couldn't breath.
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Old 09-15-2006, 10:08 AM   #57
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
I am a huge canned fish nut (anchovies, sardines herring, etc) but I really like sardines with mustard or piquant sauce rather than just in oil. Similarly, I prefer herring in sauce, as well. But I almost always eat the sardines on bread, rather than in a recipe.

Geebs, if you open the sardines and refrigerate them, make sure you seal them up really well or you might have to sleep on the couch.
Marinated herring is a New Years Eve treat for me. I get to eat the whole jar as no one else is willing to even get close to it.
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Old 09-15-2006, 10:24 AM   #58
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Marinated herring is a New Years Eve treat for me. I get to eat the whole jar as no one else is willing to even get close to it.
I was in Oslo with business colleagues and for breakfast you could have the Norwegian buffet with 8 different kinds of herring, plus cheese, ham, bread, etc or the American buffet with cold breakfast cereal and yogurt.

I was the only one to eat the herring for breakfast (it was delicious) but I was not allowed to sit at the same table as my colleagues. I couldn't be where any of them could see me.
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Old 09-15-2006, 10:35 AM   #59
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I might have to sleep on the couch just for bringing them into the house. DW asked why I got them. I told her I was really curious and wanted to try, then I asked her if she would try them. NO WAY she said. Why not? She said she won't eat anything with whiskers. HUH??? The she said, ya know like they used to show on Tom and Jerry. I was laughing so hard I couldn't breath.
Well, they come off with the beheading ritual anyways, although for fun, tell her first to tug on one of them: they're like marionette strings, and each one has a function. Have her find the one that makes the tail swish left and right ...
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Old 09-15-2006, 10:38 AM   #60
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Oh me too Andy M.!!!

My husband would rather eat worms & die than eat herring, so I get to enjoy a big jar of herring in sour cream with onions myself for the holidays (or whenever I see them on sale - lol).

Back when I lived in NY, the local fish markets use to have huge trays of whole marinated herring fillets in sour cream & onions for sale around the Xmas holidays. Talk about heaven!!!
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