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Old 10-09-2011, 07:19 AM   #1
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Shrimp etouffee question

This dish continues to elude me..

I make a mean shrimp creole and a Nice shrimp gumbo..

but I think etoufe is Shrimp in Brown Gravy..

no Tomatoes..but very light, served over rice.

Help Please? Eric, Austin Tx.

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Old 10-09-2011, 07:37 AM   #2
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Brown gravy? I thought it was a dark roux? A lot of those dishes seem to run together for me though... gumbo, etouffee, jambalaya...
I'm interested in the responses to this.
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Old 10-09-2011, 07:41 AM   #3
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Etouffee requires a roux (I prefer red-brown), the trinity (onion, green pepper and celery), garlic, spices and stock. Those are the basics, IMO, no matter what the protien. Of course stock and spices, would be based on the protien.

Since you make gumbo, these ingredients should be familiar. "Smothered" shrimp, is basically a gumbo with a lot less stock!

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Old 10-09-2011, 07:45 AM   #4
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The brown gravy is definitely a roux. I'm trying to think of what show I saw yesterday morning which made this step so easy. I think America's Home Kitchen. They lightly toasted the flour before adding the oil, which immediately turned a beautiful golden brown. It was then put it in the oven to wait for the rest of the meal. It looked so much easier than the traditional methods.
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Old 10-09-2011, 08:29 AM   #5
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The dishes change according to the cooks. When I lived down on the bayou, the neighbor fixed a dish she called shrimp etouffee, which was pink and very rich. I know it started with a roux, and had cream in it, obviously some tomato product, and I'm guessing stock from shellfish.

Many of her dishes had some fine herb in them that I now think was probably thyme. I have often thought of Naomi and her kindness to me.
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Old 10-09-2011, 08:43 AM   #6
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Basically gumbo with less stock, I like that definition, Craig.
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Old 10-09-2011, 09:57 AM   #7
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Gravy is correct

A roux is a thickener.
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Old 10-09-2011, 10:39 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G_Licious View Post
A roux is a thickener.
That is true, but in a lot of Cajun cooking, it can be thinned for recipes like etouffee, to be more "gravy" like.

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Old 10-09-2011, 11:22 AM   #9
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I was planning on making this for Sunday dinner today, but the chicken chow mein I was supposed to make yesterday has already been Mise en placed.

Food & Wine Chicken-and-Andouille Étouffée Recipe. Just subsititue ½ or all of the chicken with shrimp. I am going to substitute half the chicken with bay shrimp when I make it, probably next week some time.
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:31 AM   #10
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I was planning on making this for Sunday dinner today, but the chicken chow mein I was supposed to make yesterday has already been Mise en placed.

Food & Wine Chicken-and-Andouille Étouffée Recipe. Just subsititue ½ or all of the chicken with shrimp. I am going to substitute half the chicken with bay shrimp when I make it, probably next week some time.

It's interesting the linked recipe has no seasonings other than S&P.
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Old 10-09-2011, 11:32 AM   #11
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That is true, but ...
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:03 PM   #12
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I love how this guy makes a roux.

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Old 10-09-2011, 12:35 PM   #13
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There is no but about it.
Really? I take it you have a lot of experience with Cajun cooking?

Craig
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:45 PM   #14
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Roux's are created for many diverse dishes and they are a thickener for soups, stews, gravies and sauces.

Let's get back to the OPs question of what he should be using as the base for his shrimp etouffe.
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Old 10-09-2011, 12:51 PM   #15
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The biggest typical difference between Jambalaya and Etouffee is that Jambalaya includes many proteins (chicken and sausage and etc...) where Etouffee includes only one and is most often a seafood.

Jambalaya is a combination or melding of ingredients.

Etouffee stems from Louisiana French, "à l'étouffée" meaning braised

.40
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:27 PM   #16
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Really? I take it you have a lot of experience with Cajun cooking?

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The answer to both of those questions is yes.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:34 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by forty_caliber View Post
The biggest typical difference between Jambalaya and Etouffee is that Jambalaya includes many proteins (chicken and sausage and etc...) where Etouffee includes only one and is most often a seafood.

Jambalaya is a combination or melding of ingredients.

Etouffee stems from Louisiana French, "à l'étouffée" meaning braised

.40

I thought étouffée meant smothered. But maybe that's the same thing from another angle.

To me, étouffée is a saucy dish. Shrimp in a gravy/sauce served over white rice. In contrast, jambalaya is dry (not saucy) seasoned rice dish with proteins and veggies mixed in. At least that's the way I make it.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:41 PM   #18
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Let's get back to the OPs question of what he should be using as the base for his shrimp etouffe.
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:46 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I thought étouffée meant smothered. But maybe that's the same thing from another angle.

To me, étouffée is a saucy dish. Shrimp in a gravy/sauce served over white rice. In contrast, jambalaya is dry (not saucy) seasoned rice dish with proteins and veggies mixed in. At least that's the way I make it.
There is a great deal of variation in the way these dishes are prepared and I think that's why they are so hard to nail down.

My French Cajun aunt Cherelyn made jambalaya that was red-eye gravy based. Treebeard's in downtown Houston serves a tomato based version with lots of peppers, celery, and onions. Treebeards is one of my favorite lunch stops BTW.

This may simply be a case of one man's Jambalaya is another man's Etouffee.

.40
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Old 10-09-2011, 01:50 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by forty_caliber



This may simply be a case of one man's Jambalaya is another man's Etouffee.

.40
Well stated, .40! And what a beautiful name your aunt had, sure makes me think of French Cajun!
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