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Old 03-17-2009, 01:25 PM   #1
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What is the least fishy fish?

As I make my foray into the fish world, I'm not sure which fish to choose. I live in Seattle, so I'm thinking fresh salmon would probably be a good choice. However, I tried it last week and it was a bit fishy. Are there certain kinds of fish that are less fishy than others? I know I've had tuna that's like eating a steak.

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Old 03-17-2009, 01:28 PM   #2
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Fish is going to be fishy. The least "fishy" in my opinion is Talapia (Tilapia), I can never spell it but it's a very common fillet that most stores carry. Trout is extremely fishy, I would save that for when you are more familiar with your tastes. Orange Roughy (another spelling I just massacred) is a nice light fish too.
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Old 03-17-2009, 01:28 PM   #3
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Some fish are oilier and therefore have a stronger fish flavor. Salmon and swordfish are among those. Look for a white fish such as tilapia, cod, haddock.
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Old 03-17-2009, 01:51 PM   #4
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Tilapia is a great non-fishy fish and it lends itself well to seasonings. Perch is also good. As for orange roughy, one of my fravorite ways is to cook it on the grill outside. Soooo good.
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Old 03-17-2009, 01:59 PM   #5
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I realize that many posters here think this is not important, but as long as you are just now starting to get into eating fish, you may as well choose from the ones that are more environmentally friendly, as well as being lower in mercury. The Monterey Bay Aquarium has a wonderful site called Seafood Watch, where they provide all this information. The entire previous sentence is a link.

Super-fresh is also important for keeping fish from coming across as "fishy." If I walk into a market or section selling fish and I can smell what we call "fishy" smells, I walk out, not buying anything. At that point, it's very difficult to tell what is and isn't the culprit, especially if they are only selling fillets.

All that said, the various fishes called "sole" are the least fishy in flavor, also perch.
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Old 03-17-2009, 02:17 PM   #6
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I agree with ChefJune...Super, Super Fresh at this point in your Fish journey...Avoid frozen at this stage of your tasting experiences..It's good...but stick with fresh for now.....Also agree any of the "Flat Fish"...Flounders, soles, halibuts, turbots, and others would be good choices for very mild taste...Again... emphasis on Fresh!!
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Old 03-17-2009, 02:20 PM   #7
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I would have to say Talapia and Cod.
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Old 03-17-2009, 02:41 PM   #8
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^ I agree JustMetoo. (I have to admit, I am curious how you came up with that name) Anyway, back to the topic. Monkfish is quite meaty and less fishy in my opinion.
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Old 03-17-2009, 02:44 PM   #9
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^ I agree JustMetoo. (I have to admit, I am curious how you came up with that name) Anyway, back to the topic. Monkfish is quite meaty and less fishy in my opinion.
I like monkfish, too, Jikoni but we can't get it here anymore. I love to steam it, then put it under the broiler and serve it with drawn garlic butter. Poor man's lobster. Yummy!
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Old 03-17-2009, 04:04 PM   #10
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tilapia for sure like everyone says. before I had kids I LOVED fish.
it was kinda bad with my first, but after my second and the morning
sickness I had to this day the scent of fish makes my eyes water!!
he's almost three years old now, and I don't
know why fish is still bugging me at this point, but I can deal with
tilapia just fine.
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Old 03-17-2009, 04:06 PM   #11
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In my opinion - & this is just personal opinion - I find all freshwater fish much blander & thus less "fishy" than any saltwater fish. This would include Tilapia, Trout, & Catfish, with U.S. farm-raised Catfish my favorite of the three. But make sure it's U.S. farm-raised - not imported. U.S. farm-raised catfish are raised under very sustainable & hygenic conditions as compared to other farmed fish, & the flavor is delicate, versatile, & anything but fishy.

My favorite ways of preparing it are baked with a topping of mayonnaise, cayenne pepper, & herbs; "marinated" in a spicy Cajun dry-rub ("Emeril's Essence") & then baked or fried; or tossed with highly-seasoned flour &/or cornmeal, fried, & served with tartar sauce.

As far as saltwater fish, which I will always favor over freshwater, having been born & raised on the waters of Long Island, NY, you can choose any of the flatfish for mildness - flounder, sole, halibut, etc. Cod, even though it's "white", can still be a bit fishy (although I do love it).

Where you're located, WILD salmon is definitely a good choice. If you didn't care for it your first time around, I'd experiment again with a different recipe, perhaps with a nice sauce that compliments the fish. Salmon isn't considered mild or strong - sort of in the middle - thus it lends itself to all sorts of sauce possibilities. I like it with a teriyaki or other soy-based glaze, or even just dressed with a lemony Hollandaise (Knorr makes a great packaged one if you're like me & rarely make your own from scratch - lol).

Regardless - keep trying!! Seafood is a great medium to experiment with, & so very good for you!
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Old 03-17-2009, 04:16 PM   #12
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The only trout I've ever eaten was hand caught by myself or my family when I was growing up. I've never bought trout from any market. I always considered it fishy in nature so I am very interested in those that say it isn't. Tilapia is definitely lighter than trout. I love trout, don't get me wrong, I just find it fishy.
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Old 03-17-2009, 04:58 PM   #13
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I love most any kind of fish so I don't find trout fish at all.

Like Andy said earlier, the more oily the fish the more "fishy". As far as salmon, I find it less fishy if it's cooked to medium rare or rare. I prefer mine on the rare side and that has very little fishiness to it.

You will find a lot of fish only requires a good sprinkling of kosher salt, pepper, and some fresh-squeezed lemon. After that you can do lots of things - fresh oregano and feta cheese for a Greek note; lime, cilantro, tomatoes for a Mexican note; capers, rosemary, kalamata olives, tomatoes for an Italian note.
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:07 PM   #14
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Tilapia and Flounder come to mind.
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:11 PM   #15
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A few notes, in addition to what others have said:

- overcooked fish gets a "fishy" odor and flavor
- sole is very expensive in the U.S. - anything marketed as sole for under $20/lb. is probably something else
- imo, frozen is often better than "fresh," unless you're buying from a fishmonger whom you KNOW is buying fresh each day from fishermen. Much fish is frozen on the boat these days, so what looks "fresh" in the grocery store has often been frozen and then thawed for display, so it's not as fresh as it seems. Ask how often the fresh fish is delivered and whether it has ever been frozen.
- I stopped eating tilapia when I read that most (95%) of the tilapia sold in the U.S. comes from China, where it's grown under unsanitary conditions and given chemicals that would be illegal in this country.
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Old 03-17-2009, 05:29 PM   #16
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Wondering about the "China tilapia" I googled and found something that's more of a reason to not eat the fish than where it may or may not come from: Popular Tilapia Might Not Help Heart - US News and World Report

Another interesting article http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...080700470.html
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Old 03-17-2009, 06:28 PM   #17
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Are there certain kinds of fish that are less fishy than others?
Chicken fish and Beef fish.

I like blue gill fillets the morning after fishing.
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:07 PM   #18
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If you have it, Crappie is really good. I don't care for any other freshwater, too fishy and dirty in taste.
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Old 03-17-2009, 07:32 PM   #19
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If you have it, Crappie is really good. I don't care for any other freshwater, too fishy and dirty in taste.
Ah Texasgirl, come on up here to a spring fed lake and taste the rest of the fresh water fish though I love Crappies in the spring too. The area I live in (Wisconsin), especially the Kettle Moraine area, have fresh water lakes, springs everywhere, the fish are great. We even have springs above land here. Fish do so much better in cold lakes. (certain fish) Next time you are in my area, let me know and I'll share. We'll go fishing, clean 'em up and cook them while they are fresh. It will be a girl's night out. ~Bliss
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Old 03-17-2009, 08:17 PM   #20
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Ah Texasgirl, come on up here to a spring fed lake and taste the rest of the fresh water fish though I love Crappies in the spring too. The area I live in (Wisconsin), especially the Kettle Moraine area, have fresh water lakes, springs everywhere, the fish are great. We even have springs above land here. Fish do so much better in cold lakes. (certain fish) Next time you are in my area, let me know and I'll share. We'll go fishing, clean 'em up and cook them while they are fresh. It will be a girl's night out. ~Bliss
your on!!
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