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Old 12-21-2015, 07:49 AM   #21
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Back to the actual subject....

I keep seeing the use of sugar during brine process. Is that for a specific meat or just another preference?
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Old 12-21-2015, 08:28 AM   #22
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Sugar makes the brine taste more savory.

Ups the umami factor.
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Old 12-21-2015, 12:09 PM   #23
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Back to the actual subject....

I keep seeing the use of sugar during brine process. Is that for a specific meat or just another preference?
For a brine, salt works without the sugar, although sugar won't work without salt. I have used sugar in the brine but I don't have sugar in my diet right now, so I don't use it. Actually, I don't notice a difference. Generally, the sugar is added for pork only.
Here's some concise info..
http://whatscookingamerica.net/Pork/BriningPork.htm
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Old 12-21-2015, 12:58 PM   #24
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I use salt and sugar for turkey (along with other flavorings).
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Old 12-21-2015, 01:00 PM   #25
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I use salt and sugar for turkey (along with other flavorings).
I also always use salt and sugar (and other flavors) with anything I brine -- poultry, pork, shrimp ...
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Old 12-21-2015, 02:04 PM   #26
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That's good to know Andy and Jenny. The last time I actually cooked a turkey was years ago and brineing was unknown to me. I've always brined chicken breasts without sugar and I've never brined shrimp. I simply won't bother with lean pork unless I brine it.
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:56 PM   #27
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Sugar makes the brine taste more savory.

Ups the umami factor.
Hate to tell ya but I'm pretty sure sugar and umami have nothing to do with each other.

The four traditional flavors are sweet, sour, salty and bitter. "Umami" is the fifth flavor, associated with our receptors specific to glutimate (AKA MSG).

I'm sorry to disagree but IMO adding sugar has nothing to do with "umami factor." It ups the sweetness factor. You need to add MSG if you want to up the umami factor. Or some other umami promoter.
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:21 PM   #28
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Sugar caramelizes when cooked, creating flavors that enhance the savory/umami flavors from the Maillard reaction.
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:01 PM   #29
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People taste umami through specific umami receptors -- receptors for glutamate. I'd like to see how the Maillard reaction creates glutamates.
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Old 12-28-2015, 11:31 PM   #30
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People taste umami through specific umami receptors -- receptors for glutamate. I'd like to see how the Maillard reaction creates glutamates.
I did not say the Maillard reaction creates glutamates; they're already present in the meat. I said the caramelization of the sugar *enhances* umami flavors.
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:19 PM   #31
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Well umami flavors are those that are perceived by our umami (glutamate) receptors, so unless you are creating glutamates I don't see how your statement can be true.

Best I'll give you is "enhances flavors similar to umami flavors."

Unless you can show a relationship where the Maillard reaction creates more glutamates then your statement is patently incorrect. You need glutamates to taste umami, that's what the umami receptors are for.

If you think something enhances umami flavors, then please explain your reasoning.
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Old 12-30-2015, 10:40 PM   #32
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Originally Posted by Greg Who Cooks View Post
Well umami flavors are those that are perceived by our umami (glutamate) receptors, so unless you are creating glutamates I don't see how your statement can be true.

Best I'll give you is "enhances flavors similar to umami flavors."

Unless you can show a relationship where the Maillard reaction creates more glutamates then your statement is patently incorrect. You need glutamates to taste umami, that's what the umami receptors are for.

If you think something enhances umami flavors, then please explain your reasoning.
Here's an example: Salt enhances the flavors of many foods - even sweet baked goods, yes? So it doesn't have to hit the sweet receptors in order to enhance the flavors. Flavors are more complex than 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. Combining them makes them taste better.

I really couldn't care less what you'll "give me," though. Quit acting like you're the only one who knows about these things.
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Old 01-03-2016, 10:14 PM   #33
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We have salty receptors.
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