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Old 12-16-2015, 06:51 PM   #1
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Cooking time advice

I am making a stuffed pork loin for Xmas Dinner. For 30 people. I'm going to use 12 pounds of Pork loin cut into 4. Will this even fit in my oven all at once. I have a standard size oven. Also how long to cook it for?

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Old 12-16-2015, 06:56 PM   #2
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Don't put them too close together on one shelf. Better to put two on each of two shelves if they will fit.
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Old 12-16-2015, 07:18 PM   #3
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In addition to what Andy said, I'd also rotate the pans from front to back. Cook it to 145 degrees with a thermometer, and don't over cook.
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Old 12-16-2015, 08:17 PM   #4
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Pork loin is very lean. That can lead to dry meat if they are overcooked.

I recommend three preventative steps:
1. brine the loins overnight then rinse them off and dry them before roasting.
2. 145F is the recommended doneness temp for lean pork. However, you should take the loins out 5-10F before that temp as the interior temperature will continue to rise from carry-over cooking.
3. Let the meat rest, loosely covered for 15-20 minutes so juices can be re-absorbed into the muscle cells resulting in a juicier roast.

While the meat is resting, make a delicious gravy with the pan drippings.
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Old 12-16-2015, 08:41 PM   #5
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Excellent point about brining Andy. Today's lean pork absolutely needs to be brined. The difference is stunning.
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Old 12-17-2015, 09:07 AM   #6
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Don't use regular table salt in the brine.
I recommend Kosher salt.
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Old 12-17-2015, 10:30 AM   #7
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Personally for something like brining, table or kosher salt both work equally well. , IMO.

You just have to get the salt/water ratios right, as they are very different for table vs. kosher salt.
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Old 12-17-2015, 10:31 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by schlipfee View Post
I am making a stuffed pork loin for Xmas Dinner.

What is it stuffed with?

This can affect the necessary cooking time...
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Old 12-19-2015, 06:45 PM   #9
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2. 145F is the recommended doneness temp for lean pork. However, you should take the loins out 5-10F before that temp as the interior temperature will continue to rise from carry-over cooking.
Exactly what I was going to point out until I reached reading your post. I did some roast pork a couple weeks ago and for some reason the continued warming increased much more than I expected, and the pork was disappointingly dry. Coincidentally I'm having a roast, stuffed pork chop tonight and I'm definitely removing it at 135F, maybe even 130F.

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Personally for something like brining, table or kosher salt both work equally well. , IMO.

You just have to get the salt/water ratios right, as they are very different for table vs. kosher salt.
Salt is salt is salt, NaCL, sodium chloride. In solution there is absolutely NO difference in different types of salt, except such as "gourmet" or "specialty" salts which are chosen for their unusual impurities, or flavored salt.

Interestingly (or not, you decide) ALL salt is sea salt! Unless it came in on a meteorite all salt has its ultimate source as an ocean, whether a prehistoric ocean that became folded into the layers of the Earth's crust and mined, or of course what is usually called sea salt which is evaporated salt water from an ocean.

But admittedly I'm being picky, picky. "Sea salt" usually refers to salt made by filling a basin from the ocean, then closing the channel and waiting until the sun evaporates the water.

I have a conundrum regarding salt from dry lakes such as found in Death Valley and similar dry lakes in the Owens Valley and other locales. I suspect it is geologic salt eroded from the mountains around the valley enclosing the lake that was dissolved by rain and snow melt and eventually deposited in a basin with no outlets.

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What is it stuffed with?

This can affect the necessary cooking time...
I'm wondering the same myself. My tonight's pork chop is stuffed... I think I'll stick the thermometer in the meat and cook as I described above.

If you wish to be doubly careful you could possibly nuke the stuffing to 145F, which is the FDA's generally accepted food serving safety standard. However, actual food safety in the real world depends not only on temperature but time at that temperature too.

For example, I use my Sous Vide ("water oven") to cook steaks to a done temperature of 120F, way below the 145F, but the cooking cycle is 3-4 hours, and temperature over time kills bacteria as well as a short exposure to 145F.
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Old 12-19-2015, 08:57 PM   #10
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Salt is salt is salt, NaCL, sodium chloride. In solution there is absolutely NO difference in different types of salt, except such as "gourmet" or "specialty" salts which are chosen for their unusual impurities, or flavored salt.
I think you missed the point Jenny was making about any salt for brining. Different salts simply measure differently. A brine recipe with the right ratio of a specific salt to water is crucial.
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Old 12-19-2015, 09:09 PM   #11
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I think you missed the point Jenny was making about any salt for brining. Different salts simply measure differently. A brine recipe with the right ratio of a specific salt to water is crucial.
Right, Kayelle. The grain size is different among table salt, Mortons Kosher Salt and Diamond Crystal Kosher salt. As a result, a cup of table salt is equivalent by weight to 1.5 cups of Mortons and 2 cups of Diamond Crystal.
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Old 12-19-2015, 09:30 PM   #12
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Right, Kayelle. The grain size is different among table salt, Mortons Kosher Salt and Diamond Crystal Kosher salt. As a result, a cup of table salt is equivalent by weight to 1.5 cups of Mortons and 2 cups of Diamond Crystal.
Wow, that's a huge difference Andy. Thanks. My go to brine for pork is 1/4 cup of Morton's Kosher, and 4 cups of water. I don't even have table salt anymore. Sometimes I add herbs, but most times I don't.
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:01 PM   #13
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I think you missed the point Jenny was making about any salt for brining. Different salts simply measure differently. A brine recipe with the right ratio of a specific salt to water is crucial.
You measure salt by volume??? In a marinade or brine???

Sheesh, I measure by what fits in my hand. I measure by what looks right.

Maybe in baking you need measures. (You do.) But there are so many recipes where your eyes or your hand are more than adequate.
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:09 PM   #14
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You measure salt by volume??? In a marinade or brine???

Sheesh, I measure by what fits in my hand. I measure by what looks right.

Maybe in baking you need measures. (You do.) But there are so many recipes where your eyes or your hand are more than adequate.
No need to take that attitude. Different strokes...
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:17 PM   #15
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I have a conundrum regarding salt from dry lakes such as found in Death Valley and similar dry lakes in the Owens Valley and other locales. I suspect it is geologic salt eroded from the mountains around the valley enclosing the lake that was dissolved by rain and snow melt and eventually deposited in a basin with no outlets.
Actually, eons ago, those areas were sea bottoms. That's where the salt came from.
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Old 12-19-2015, 11:36 PM   #16
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Yeah, that's what I said.
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Old 12-20-2015, 01:00 AM   #17
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You measure salt by volume??? In a marinade or brine???

Sheesh, I measure by what fits in my hand. I measure by what looks right.

Maybe in baking you need measures. (You do.) But there are so many recipes where your eyes or your hand are more than adequate.
The subject at hand on this thread is salt brining, not marinade or baking.
Liberty can be taken with salt in marinade, not with brining. Yes, measurements on the ratio of specific salt to water in brining is necessary. I'm very surprised you don't know that. Just saying.
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Old 12-20-2015, 03:21 AM   #18
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...Yes, measurements on the ratio of specific salt to water in brining is necessary...
True, Kayelle. When I was working through my pickle recipe this summer, I learned that there is a huge difference between 1/2 cup of Kosher salt and 1/2 cup of pickling salt. (Keep in mind I haven't pickled anything since I last helped my Dad make dill pickles before I was married...in 1974.) Since I always have Kosher on hand, and it doesn't have any additives, I used that for the pickles the first time. Not really enough salt. I decided I needed a box of pickling salt. The 4# box of pickling salt was noticeably smaller than the 3# box of Kosher salt! It was easy to see how fine the pickling salt was compared to the flakes of Kosher salt. Thankfully, using pickling salt was just what was needed to achieve the proper salinity in the brine.
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Old 12-20-2015, 01:58 PM   #19
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Yeah, that's what I said.
So what is the conundrum?
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Old 12-20-2015, 05:23 PM   #20
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I'm very surprised you don't know that. Just saying.
Oh pshaw!

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So what is the conundrum?
Beats the heck out of me. If I knew I'd tell ya!
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