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Old 02-07-2012, 02:35 PM   #1
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ISO ideas for "English" meal/dessert.

Hi! I知 new to this forum. I知 a French student and I would like to do a meal typically English, when my friends will go at home. I would introduce some culinary specialties from England to them. Have you got an idea of dish and of dessert? I would like recipes, easy does it and cheap. We will be 6 persons.


Thanks!

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Old 02-07-2012, 02:44 PM   #2
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Fish & chips with malt vinegar.
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Old 02-07-2012, 03:34 PM   #3
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Cornish Pasties;
Make a basic pastry dough with 6 cups of all purpose flour, and about 2 cups of lard or shortening, and 3 tsp. salt. mix with pastry cutter, or finger tips until the fat and flour combine to make little pea-sized nuggets of dough. Add more flour or fat as needed to achieve this consistancy. When the dough has reached the pea-gravel stage, add 6 tbs. ice water and form into 6 equal balls. Place these into the refrigerator to rest.

Peel six potatoes and 2 rutabeggas (sweades), and two onions, then dice into small cubes, as for a hash. Season with salt and pepper and a tablespoon of garlic powder.

Dice 1 1/2 pounds of beef chuck. Combine the meat and vegetables together in a large bowl. Toss with spoon to mix.

Flour a working surface and roll out 1 dough ball until it makes a thin and round crust. Place 1/2 cup of the filling onto one side of the crust. Fold the crust in half and roll the edges toward the center, pinching as you roll. Do this with all of the dough until you have made 6 pasties. Bake at 375 dgrees F. for 1 hour. Remove and serve with beef gravy.

Or, you could always make your freinds some gruel.

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Old 02-07-2012, 04:03 PM   #4
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I had a pastie at a pub/restaurant that was owned by two men from Scotland. It was delicious. It is in Vermont. I went there a few times and each time I had something different. I was never disappointed. True English pub fare. To bad my first husband wasn't alive to enjoy it. He was from Cockermouth, England in the Lakes District. He always talked about the food he ate as a child. Thanks for the memory.
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Old 02-07-2012, 04:57 PM   #5
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Fish & Chips mentioned above is a great choice, IMO.
Shepherd's Pie is easy and fairly inexpensive.
English Trifle for dessert?
Use the search feature at the top right of the page to find recipes. Meanwhile, I have a good one for English Trifle and will post it.
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:11 PM   #6
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See also: English Toffee Dessert (easier than the trifle).
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:12 PM   #7
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Thank you very much Chief Longwind Of The North ! I didn’t know the Cornish pasties, I’m looking an image of this dish, and that looks very nice. Along, the recipe seems to me easy to make. I will make this recipe most probably. Thanks!
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:20 PM   #8
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I hesitate between fish and chips and cornish pasties. And you, which one do you prefer?
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:25 PM   #9
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Thanks !

Thank you very much everybody, for yours ideas and yours councels !
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:30 PM   #10
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I prefer to eat freshly caught brook trout, cleaned and dredged in unseasoned flour. Then pan fry in a couple in a couple inches of oil, until golden brown on both sides, and salt. Serve only with properly cooked, home made french fries (chips), and a bit of ketchip. I'm not crazy about heavy batters on my fish. I want the skin crispy and light, with the tails to be eaten like potato chips.

Most fish & chips that I've had were heavily battered, usually with a beer batter, and were sometimes soggy with grease. A good battered piece of fish is something I can enjoy. But I won't go out of my way to find it. I was spoiled living next to the greates lake of them all, Lake Superior. And my dad could fry trout like only his father before him could.

Now pasties, the ingredients are easier to come by, and are absolutely deliscious. I make them often enough. So for this dinner that you are making, if it were me, I'd be making pasties. Plus, some people just aren't crazy about fish. I've met a good number of people that don't like fish. I've never met anyone who doesn't like pasties. The pasties are a safer pick.

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Old 02-07-2012, 05:31 PM   #11
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Roast Beef and Yorkshire pudding is really easy
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:32 PM   #12
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Thanks for yours ideas ! Between the English Trifle and the English Tofee Dessert, what is the dessert the most popular ?
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Originally Posted by SharonT View Post
Fish & Chips mentioned above is a great choice, IMO.
Shepherd's Pie is easy and fairly inexpensive.
English Trifle for dessert?
Use the search feature at the top right of the page to find recipes. Meanwhile, I have a good one for English Trifle and will post it.
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:37 PM   #13
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Hmm. Why not both?

Steak and kidney pie was popular when I went to London. I didn't care for the kidney part, but the rest was good.

Two Fat Ladies had a marvelous cooking show, with lots of great ideas. Google them. They were on Food Network, as I recall, and should have some stuff on YouTube.
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Old 02-07-2012, 05:39 PM   #14
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I have to leave, because tomorrow I will have classes very early. But tomorrow afternoon, I will answer to you. Thanks ! You have given me very good ideas!
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Old 02-07-2012, 06:17 PM   #15
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hmm, it seems we have no anglophiles about.

oddly enough, THE most popular dish in england is curry chicken, tikka masala being the most common.
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Old 02-07-2012, 06:37 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cherry-Rasberry View Post
Thanks for yours ideas ! Between the English Trifle and the English Tofee Dessert, what is the dessert the most popular ?
The trifle is probably more authentic as far as having a dessert of distinctly English origin (maybe?). The other dessert is probably called English Toffee Dessert because the Toffee is English... not the dessert. It is very easy to do, though, and incredibly good.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:00 PM   #17
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hmm, it seems we have no anglophiles about.

oddly enough, THE most popular dish in england is curry chicken, tikka masala being the most common.
huh. I wouldn't say no anglophiles... The guy (or gal) has gotten several responses. He might confuse his friends my presenting tikka masala as a culinary specialty from England.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:12 PM   #18
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all of the previous respinses were good. i'm sorry you were offended, sharont.
i was pointing out that they were more of an american view of english food.

where's bolas or tatt when you need them?
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:41 PM   #19
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all of the previous respinses were good. i'm sorry you were offended, sharont.
i was pointing out that they were more of an american view of english food.

where's bolas or tatt when you need them?
Nah, nah -- not offended. Just wanted credit for my fabulous (American) English Trifle... and all those hours watching Upstairs, Downstairs and Downton Abbey.

>>where's bolas or tatt when you need them?
where indeed.
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Old 02-07-2012, 07:58 PM   #20
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Sticky Toffee

I think you might be referring to sticky toffee pudding.

Another great and easy traditional pub dish is bangers and mash. Simply sausages, mashed potatoes and usually served with peas.
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