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Old 07-13-2018, 07:10 AM   #1
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Looking for Half Sour Pickle Recipe/technique

Pickling Cucumbers are in full swing and Im looking for a new recipe / technique.
I know we've had discussions on pickles in the past. Im looking specifically for half sour immediate eating (dont need to store or can for any period of time).

Last few years Ive been following the same basic recipe, and I think I need a change.

All suggestions welcome, and if someone could direct me to previous threads that cover the topic, that is fine too. I may have overlooked a few.

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Old 07-13-2018, 11:07 AM   #2
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In New York terminology, a "full-sour" kosher dill is one that has fully fermented, while a "half-sour", given a shorter stay in the brine, is still crisp and bright green.[10] Elsewhere, these pickles may sometimes be termed "old" and "new" dills.

I read that but if I recall, from researching it a few years ago, half sours have less salt than full sour pickles. But that is from memory.



Unfortunately, I don't have a dependable recipe on hand. I usually make fermented pickles in food safe 5 gallon buckets and I put in spices/dill, water, and salt. I put a plate over the cucumbers/brine, with a zip lock bag full of salt water to weigh it down. Then I cover it in a towel to keep out dust. I check it daily and skim any scum that forms (which just shows that it's working).


This year, in particular, I'll be making the other kind of pickles for canning, w/vinegar, water, salt, spices, dill weed, and Emeril's sweet pickles. We don't grow cucumbers every year, only some years, and then I make up 30 or so jars to use over the next couple of years.


Good luck Larry, they'll be good!
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Old 07-13-2018, 11:20 AM   #3
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Cooking Goddess makes fermented cucumber pickles. I'm pretty sure she has posted her method here somewhere.
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:45 PM   #4
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I love FULL sour pickles.
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:54 PM   #5
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Cooking Goddess makes fermented cucumber pickles. I'm pretty sure she has posted her method here somewhere.
Tada!

Crock Dill Pickles

These aren't half-sour, larry. I make them full-on Kosher pickle style. However, I've been known to sneak a taste just two or three days into brining, and at that point the pickle might be considered half-sour. They were still yummy.
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Old 07-18-2018, 05:58 PM   #6
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Hey larry, found a video on half sour pickles. I wasn't even looking for it.
It's 10 minutes and kind of entertaining.
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Old 07-18-2018, 07:39 PM   #7
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I’ve posted my recipe for pickles here before. If you use the same recipe, but keep pickles for 2-3 days instead of 5. You’ll get your half sour pickles
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Old 08-05-2018, 02:03 PM   #8
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I made my first batch of homemade pickles. They are full sour after only 5 days. Should I strain the stuff out of the brine then add the brine back in with the pickles? Or do I have to boil it first?

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Old 08-05-2018, 05:05 PM   #9
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I've always strained the brine, then stuffed the pickles into a jar and poured the clear brine over the pickles to cover, msm. I used to just wash the jar and then fill it. Now I do give the jar a quick dunk in boiling water since I also use that jar to hold any extra brine, plus it holds down the plate that keeps the pickles fully submerged. I'd use my Dad's rock, but Loverly has that along with Dad's huge pickling crock. I've never boiled the brine, not when I first make them nor when I jar and refrigerate them. Whether they're acidic enough or we've been lucky, I don't know. I do know that no one in the family has ever been sick from homemade pickles - a trend that has been going strong for over half a century.
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Old 06-16-2020, 06:10 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
I've always strained the brine, then stuffed the pickles into a jar and poured the clear brine over the pickles to cover, msm. I used to just wash the jar and then fill it. Now I do give the jar a quick dunk in boiling water since I also use that jar to hold any extra brine, plus it holds down the plate that keeps the pickles fully submerged. I'd use my Dad's rock, but Loverly has that along with Dad's huge pickling crock. I've never boiled the brine, not when I first make them nor when I jar and refrigerate them. Whether they're acidic enough or we've been lucky, I don't know. I do know that no one in the family has ever been sick from homemade pickles - a trend that has been going strong for over half a century.
This man/woman is right, properly sanitizing your equipment should be standard protocol. Hate to say that not so many people know to do this.
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Old 06-16-2020, 06:16 PM   #11
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When I've made these pickles I've learned to use Horseradish leaves or Grape leaves in the bottom of the jar. I understand that cherry tree leaves, or a very small piece of Oak leaf will work also. Oak is most potent as they contain loads of Tannin.

I use the small National Pickling Cucumbers which need to have 1/2 inch cut off of the bloom end and 1/4 inch off the stem end. Cucumbers have a natural enzyme at the bloom end (pectinace) that promotes the rapid decomposition of the fruit so that it will seed the ground it lays on. The Tannin in the leaves helps to inhibit any of it that has leached into the center of the cucumber.

Most important....... I don't place the cucumbers in water. (no more than I would mushrooms) I wipe them clean with a damp sponge. I want them to absorb the brine and if they have already absorbed the wash water they
won't be so able to do that.

I place the "leaf" in the bottom of the jar, along with crushed garlic & minced onion. Then a head of Dill and some dill seed. Black pepper corns (cracked) goes in. I have used calcium chloride (Ball Pickle Crisp) at 1/4 tsp or less per pint jar. I split the cucumbers in half length wise and stuff them in tight so they won't float. Then add the brine to cover them.

I have even used a little pickling vinegar 7% acid, in the brine. (not true half or full sour adding vinegar)

When I clean my jars in hot water the last thing I do is add a little vinegar and shake it up well to coat the inside of the jar before pouring it into the next jar. This helps sterilize the jars. (and easier way of doing it from "The Vinegar Book")

After a couple of weeks, the time I let mine sit in the fridge, I open a jar and pry out the first pickle with a fork so the others will become easier to get out.

I've used a little pickling vinegar in my brine or a little apple cider vinegar because I just like the flavor it imparts.
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