"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 01-04-2022, 11:53 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Appleton
Posts: 124
Any fairly easy mideastern or Persian recipes

one thing I found out is there are so many strange spices that are required in mideastern and Persian recipes. With Indian and Chinese recipes it is different because there are many Indian and Chinese stores and restaurants.

georgevan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2022, 12:12 PM   #2
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Appleton
Posts: 124
What I mean is chinese and Indian cooking have become American iced so ingredients are easy to get. I think.
georgevan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2022, 01:32 PM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 26,264
It might be easier than you think. There are a few unusual spices in Middle Eastern food, but I have found that in many cases, they use ingredients that are familiar to us in different ways. For example, they use a *lot* more fresh herbs than most Americans do.

Here's one recipe I enjoy that is basically Turkish meatloaf: https://ozlemsturkishtable.com/2011/...-tepsi-kebabi/

Do a search for Samin Nosrat and Persian recipes. Her family is from Iran and she has a lot of recipes online. Here's one: http://www.mylilikoikitchen.com/2021...d-onion-salad/

This YouTube channel by a Turkish woman who lives in Istanbul is fun to watch and has great recipes: https://youtube.com/refikabirgul

Hope this helps.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2022, 10:02 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 11,495
I have some Persian recipes in my repitoire I would be happy to share. I haven't made them in quite a while, but I remember they came out good and they impressed my Armenian friends.

Persian Rice (Tah Dig)


Ingredients:

4 cups water
1 cup long-grain basmati rice
½ cup plain Greek yogurt
1 tsp kosher salt
⅛ tsp crushed saffron threads
1½ Tbs unsalted butter
2 tsp canola oil

Instructions:

Place 4 cups of water in a saucepan over medium-high heat and bring it to a boil. Add the rice and boil it for 10 minutes. Drain the rice, rinse it with cold water, and drain it again.

Combine the yogurt, salt, and saffron in a medium bowl and stir the rice into the yogurt mixture.

Melt the butter in a medium nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add the oil and swirl to coat. Add the rice mixture to the pan, lightly packing the rice down. Wrap a clean, dry dish towel around the lid to the pan, tying it at the handle; place the lid on the pan and cook the rice, covered, over medium heat 20 minutes (do not stir or uncover). Reduce the temperature to medium-low and cook the rice for an additional 20 minutes or until rice is tender on top and a golden crust forms on the bottom.

Loosen the rice crust with a rubber spatula around the edges. Place a plate over the top of the pan, and invert the rice onto the plate, browned side up. Cut the rice into wedges and serve immediately.

Persian Chicken Stew (Khoresh-e fesenjān)


Ingredients:

1 onion, chopped
1 Tbs unsalted butter
2 Tbs light tasting olive oil
2 Tbs Amoretti Premium Pomegranate Syrup
1 cup walnut halves
1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts/thighs, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 cup chicken stock
1 Tbs plus 1 tsp sugar
¼ tsp turmeric
⅛ tsp cinnamon
⅛ tsp ground nutmeg
salt & pepper to taste

Instructions:

Spread coarsely chopped walnuts in a single layer in a large skillet over medium high heat, stirring frequently until lightly toasted. Remove the walnuts from the heat and allow them to cool.

In a Dutch oven, heat the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Pat the chicken pieces dry, season them with salt and pepper, place them in the pan and cook them until they are golden brown on all sides. Remove the chicken from the pan and set it aside and keep it warm.

Sauté the onions in the pan until they are translucent, add the chicken stock and bring it to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to release the browned bits.

Return the chicken pieces to the pan, reduce the heat, and simmer gently for 30 minutes.

Add the pomegranate molasses, 1 Tbs sugar, turmeric, cinnamon, and ground nutmeg. Cover the pan and continue to simmer gently over low heat for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and adjust the sugar and salt to taste. Serve over rice and garnish with pomegranate seeds and chopped walnuts.

Persian Vegetable Casserole (Kukune Sabzi)


Ingredients:

2 cups leeks, white and green parts, finely chopped
1 cup romaine or butter lettuce, finely chopped
1 cup parsley, finely chopped
2 cups spinach, finely chopped
1 cup scallions, finely chopped
1½ Tbs flour
⅓ cup chopped walnuts
8 eggs
2 Tbs butter
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 325F.

Put all the vegetables and herbs in a bowl and add salt and pepper to taste. Add the flour and walnuts and mix them into the vegetable mixture.

Whisk the eggs and stir them into the vegetable mixture.

Butter an oven safe casserole dish with 2 Tbs of butter and pour the vegetable mixture into the casserole dish. Bake the casserole in a 325F oven for 1 hour, or until the top is crisp and brown.

I used to have a Palestinian girl friend so I might have some middle eastern recipes, too. I will check my Recipes folder and see what I can come with.
__________________
The older I get, the harder it is to tolerate STUPID!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2022, 10:36 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 11,495
Here are a couple of Middle Eastern recipes you might enjoy:

Makloubeh


Ingredients:

1 large cauliflower (or two smaller ones)
2 lbs lamb shoulder chops, with the bones but trimmed of fat
1 large onion
2 cups of rice
1 tsp allspice
½ tsp pepper
dash of garlic powder
2 Tbs butter
oil for frying
4 tsp salt (or more to taste)
3½ cups of water or meat broth
Plain yogurt for garnish

Instructions:

Season the meat with salt. Pour a little oil in a skillet, and wait until very hot.

Sear the lamb chops or chicken pieces in the skillet until seared on the outside, set aside. Then sauté the sliced onions until caramelized and set aside.

Break cauliflower into medium sized florets, deep fry in hot oil until golden brown, drain on paper towels and set aside.

In a 4 quart pot, put in the seared lamb or chicken and then cover with water or broth. Add the allspice and garlic powder, or two whole cloves of garlic if you wish. Once it boils, let it simmer for about 15 minutes, removing the scum from the broth.

Add the cauliflower, onions, and rice. Let it come to a fast boil, then cover and simmer for about 40 minutes.

Let cool for ½ hour, then turn the pot upside down on a large platter. You can garnish with toasted pine nuts if you wish, and serve in bowls with dollops of yogurt on top. This dish takes time but it's worth it!

Note: You can use bone-in chicken pieces in place of lamb.

Moroccan Lamb and Chickpeas


Ingredients:

1 pound lean ground lamb
2 tsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 cups vertically sliced onion
½ cup diagonally cut carrot
¾ tsp ground cumin
¾ tsp ground cinnamon
½ tsp ground coriander
¼ tsp ground red pepper
2 cups fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
½ cup golden raisins
3 Tbs tomato paste
1½ Tbs lemon zest
¼ tsp salt
15½-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed and drained
½ cup chopped fresh cilantro
1 Tbs fresh lemon juice

Instructions:

Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add lamb to pan; cook 6 minutes, stirring to crumble. Remove lamb from pan with a slotted spoon. Discard drippings. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion and carrot to pan; sauté 4 minutes. Add cumin, cinnamon, coriander, and pepper and sauté 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add reserved lamb, broth, and next 5 ingredients (through chickpeas); bring to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer 4 minutes or until mixture thickens. Remove from heat. Stir in cilantro and lemon juice.
__________________
The older I get, the harder it is to tolerate STUPID!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-04-2022, 11:07 PM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,685
I like to annoy my son by saying that Batman's ultimate enemy is now selling an Arabic spice blend, Ras al Hanout.
__________________
And I wanna rock your gypsy soul
Just like way back in the days of old
And together we will float
Into the mystic
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 11:45 AM   #7
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2020
Location: Appleton
Posts: 124
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sir_Loin_of_Beef View Post
I have some Persian recipes in my repitoire I would be happy to share. I haven't made them in quite a while, but I remember they came out good and they impressed my Armenian friends.

Persian Rice (Tah Dig)


Ingredients:

4 cups water
1 cup long-grain basmati rice
½ cup plain Greek yogurt
1 tsp kosher salt
⅛ tsp crushed saffron threads
1½ Tbs unsalted butter
2 tsp canola oil

Instructions:

Place 4 cups of water in a saucepan over medium-high heat and bring it to a boil. Add the rice and boil it for 10 minutes. Drain the rice, rinse it with cold water, and drain it again.

Combine the yogurt, salt, and saffron in a medium bowl and stir the rice into the yogurt mixture.

Melt the butter in a medium nonstick sauté pan over medium heat. Add the oil and swirl to coat. Add the rice mixture to the pan, lightly packing the rice down. Wrap a clean, dry dish towel around the lid to the pan, tying it at the handle; place the lid on the pan and cook the rice, covered, over medium heat 20 minutes (do not stir or uncover). Reduce the temperature to medium-low and cook the rice for an additional 20 minutes or until rice is tender on top and a golden crust forms on the bottom.

Loosen the rice crust with a rubber spatula around the edges. Place a plate over the top of the pan, and invert the rice onto the plate, browned side up. Cut the rice into wedges and serve immediately.

Persian Chicken Stew (Khoresh-e fesenjān)


Ingredients:

1 onion, chopped
1 Tbs unsalted butter
2 Tbs light tasting olive oil
2 Tbs Amoretti Premium Pomegranate Syrup
1 cup walnut halves
1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts/thighs, cut into 2-inch pieces
1 cup chicken stock
1 Tbs plus 1 tsp sugar
¼ tsp turmeric
⅛ tsp cinnamon
⅛ tsp ground nutmeg
salt & pepper to taste

Instructions:

Spread coarsely chopped walnuts in a single layer in a large skillet over medium high heat, stirring frequently until lightly toasted. Remove the walnuts from the heat and allow them to cool.

In a Dutch oven, heat the butter and olive oil over medium-high heat until it shimmers. Pat the chicken pieces dry, season them with salt and pepper, place them in the pan and cook them until they are golden brown on all sides. Remove the chicken from the pan and set it aside and keep it warm.

Sauté the onions in the pan until they are translucent, add the chicken stock and bring it to a boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to release the browned bits.

Return the chicken pieces to the pan, reduce the heat, and simmer gently for 30 minutes.

Add the pomegranate molasses, 1 Tbs sugar, turmeric, cinnamon, and ground nutmeg. Cover the pan and continue to simmer gently over low heat for 1 hour, stirring every 20 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and adjust the sugar and salt to taste. Serve over rice and garnish with pomegranate seeds and chopped walnuts.

Persian Vegetable Casserole (Kukune Sabzi)


Ingredients:

2 cups leeks, white and green parts, finely chopped
1 cup romaine or butter lettuce, finely chopped
1 cup parsley, finely chopped
2 cups spinach, finely chopped
1 cup scallions, finely chopped
1½ Tbs flour
⅓ cup chopped walnuts
8 eggs
2 Tbs butter
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions:

Preheat the oven to 325F.

Put all the vegetables and herbs in a bowl and add salt and pepper to taste. Add the flour and walnuts and mix them into the vegetable mixture.

Whisk the eggs and stir them into the vegetable mixture.

Butter an oven safe casserole dish with 2 Tbs of butter and pour the vegetable mixture into the casserole dish. Bake the casserole in a 325F oven for 1 hour, or until the top is crisp and brown.

I used to have a Palestinian girl friend so I might have some middle eastern recipes, too. I will check my Recipes folder and see what I can come with.
That Persian chicken stew sounds good but where in the hell can I find Amaretti Premium Pomegrantate Syrup. What can be used instead. Maple syrup?
georgevan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 12:17 PM   #8
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 26,264
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgevan View Post
That Persian chicken stew sounds good but where in the hell can I find Amaretti Premium Pomegrantate Syrup. What can be used instead. Maple syrup?
You don't need that particular brand - SLoB used to work there, so he's partial

If you don't have a Middle Eastern store near you, you can make pomegranate molasses/syrup by reducing pomegranate juice, which is available in any grocery store, in a saucepan till it thickens. Maple syrup has a very different flavor and won't be a good substitute.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 04:09 PM   #9
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,969
In Canada, pomegranate juice is about the same price as pomegranate syrup is on Amazon. Which means 1/2 the price.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 04:42 PM   #10
Certifiable Executive Chef
 
Janet H's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 3,949
Pomegranate syrup is actually very tart (sometimes called pomegranate molasses) and while it has a distinctive flavor that's wonderful you could probably substitute a really good (thick) balsamic vinegar.. just a thought.
__________________
Forget love... I'd rather fall in chocolate!
Janet H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 05:02 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,969
Janet! Just 2 minutes ago I was reading a recipe that said that very thing.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-05-2022, 07:38 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 11,495
Pomegranate syrup, a.k.a pomegranate molasses, is available in most major grocery stores and online @Amoretti.com or Amazon.com. Do not use balsamic vinegar!
__________________
The older I get, the harder it is to tolerate STUPID!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2022, 06:42 AM   #13
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,969
Well, lucky you Sir LoB!
Around here Pomegranate Syrup/Molasses is available only thru Amazon. Now, granted, I have not checked every grocer in the Hamilton-Toronto area with a population of over 8 million, so I might have missed one.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2022, 08:45 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Caracas
Posts: 1,081
The pomegranate is a "souring" agent - you want something to provide acidity. Sumac, Anardana (in Indian groceries), or dried mango powder will do the trick.
Balsamic vinegar is a totally different animal, IMHO.
karadekoolaid is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2022, 10:38 AM   #15
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,969
On an Iranian Food blogger's post, she suggested thickened(?) Balsamic Vinegar. I have a thick Balsmic Glaze but that is very sweet.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-06-2022, 07:28 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,685
You might be able to make a pomegranate syrup out of pomegranate juice.

I made one out of a store-bought juice mix of pomegranate and tart cherry juices.

That reminds me; I need to reduce a pot of balsamic vinegar again. Something best done outside.
__________________
And I wanna rock your gypsy soul
Just like way back in the days of old
And together we will float
Into the mystic
buckytom is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2022, 05:27 AM   #17
Senior Cook
 
bbqcoder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 470
I was recently in Cleveland and ate at a middle eastern restaurant that has a lot of good dishes. Need to try my hand at making some of them especially the salad which seems to be red onions, cukes, tomatoes, and parsley. Anyone know what this is called and has a good recipe?
bbqcoder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2022, 05:56 AM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 27,011
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbqcoder View Post
I was recently in Cleveland and ate at a middle eastern restaurant that has a lot of good dishes. Need to try my hand at making some of them especially the salad which seems to be red onions, cukes, tomatoes, and parsley. Anyone know what this is called and has a good recipe?
Was it tabbouleh? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tabbouleh
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2022, 06:35 AM   #19
Master Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 5,969
bbqcoder,

try unicorns in the kitchen, she has several salads listed - Turkish, Persian, Lebanese.

I CopyMT this one, turkish-tomato-salad-recipe-gavurdagi

Scroll down a little over halfway for more salads.
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2022, 09:19 AM   #20
Senior Cook
 
bbqcoder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2019
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 470
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
No but that looks good. I had the Genie's Combo plate.



The salad is in the lower right corner and is called lebanese salata after looking at https://aladdins.com/our-menu/

Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
bbqcoder,

try unicorns in the kitchen, she has several salads listed - Turkish, Persian, Lebanese.

I CopyMT this one, turkish-tomato-salad-recipe-gavurdagi

Scroll down a little over halfway for more salads.
Thanks for this. Looks tasty. Will try it out. I need to try more different salads instead of the same old mixed greens that I make.
bbqcoder is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
easy, ideas, recipe, recipes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:46 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.