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Old 01-22-2021, 07:29 AM   #1
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Best way to store abundance of Pine Nuts

I ordered a decent sized bag of pine nuts online.
I used a very small amount for a recipe and now have a lot left over.
Im not sur how quickly I will go through them, so curious about the best way to store them for long term storage ( could be a year before I go through this much).

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Old 01-22-2021, 07:53 AM   #2
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I always buy a big bag at Costco, then store them in the freezer with all my other nuts and seeds. They stay loose, so it's easy to take what you need. I found that if I tried airtight jars in a cupboard, the oils in any nuts or seeds turn rancid.
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Old 01-22-2021, 07:54 AM   #3
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Definitely freeze them. They will eventually go rancid, as will most nuts, if kept at room temp. too long. I had a large box in my "dead freezer", with nothing but nuts - easy to slide in and out, when I wanted something from it. No big deal taking that out and sticking it on the back porch temporarily, but it will be frozen again, in my new freezer.
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Old 01-22-2021, 08:27 AM   #4
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Thanks. Freezing was what I figured, just wanted to confirm. Already got almonds and walnuts in there. I just don't do pine nuts all that often.
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Old 01-22-2021, 08:31 AM   #5
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I try to remember to freeze all and any nuts if I'm not using them within a week, max. 2 weeks. I found I would forget them and then poof!.. rancid, and they aren't very cheap any more. Of course, Pine Nuts never were.
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Old 01-22-2021, 09:18 AM   #6
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Sesame seeds and poppy seeds should be in the freezer, too.
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Old 01-22-2021, 04:59 PM   #7
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Sesame seeds and poppy seeds should be in the freezer, too.
Those are two more in my "dry goods" in the freezer, along with millet, brown rice, freekah and other versions of cracked wheat, rolled barley (never had whole barley go bad - only rolled), cous cous and Israeli cous cous (these didn't really go rancid, but developed an off flavor when stored too long at room temp).

I keep a lot of other grains and legumes vacuum sealed, in tubs at room temp, with no problems, but these, and any nuts, can go bad, so they stay in my freezer. I tend to buy in large quantities, when I get deals!
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:39 PM   #8
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I think I'm fairly lucky - most of my cupboards are on an outside wall and stay rather cool, especially in winter.
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:40 PM   #9
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Sesame seeds ... should be in the freezer, too.
Seriously? I have a number of bags of Bob's Red Mill sesame seeds with a "best by" date of 11/2021. Should these really be frozen? And if so, how much longer will they last?
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Old 01-22-2021, 05:51 PM   #10
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Scott - they'll be very good, 2 months is not a big deal - but then again if it is in a warm storage area... maybe not. LOL

why chance it? toss'em in the freezer! I ruined a beautiful pesto using stale nuts. Very un'cook' like to not have checked them!
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Old 01-22-2021, 06:42 PM   #11
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Seriously? I have a number of bags of Bob's Red Mill sesame seeds with a "best by" date of 11/2021. Should these really be frozen? And if so, how much longer will they last?
Bob's Red Mill, and many other grains, nuts, and snacks these days, pump nitrogen into the bags, to help them store longer. But as soon as you open the bag, unless you vacuum seal them after that, the oxygen starts doing it's thing.

On the topic of sesame, something strange I noticed long ago, was that raw sesame oil goes rancid faster than most oils, but toasted sesame oil (I haven't bought any brand but Kadoya, since my early days, when I tested different brands, and some "diluted" [with cheaper oils] ones went rancid) would last forever, stored at room temp! But raw sesame seeds seemed to last longer than toasted sesame seeds, though they will go rancid. Which is why I keep a jar of each in the fridge, the rest downstairs in the freezer, to refill from.
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Old 01-23-2021, 03:17 PM   #12
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Another thing I remembered that I keep in the freezer, when I got it out for the chili - masa! This, and other corn products, like polenta, will go rancid, unless de-branned, de-germed and de-everything that's good for you, and has much flavor. That kind will keep at room temp - cornmeal version of AP flour!
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Old 01-24-2021, 12:55 PM   #13
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Scott - they'll be very good, 2 months is not a big deal
Thanks, but not sure what you mean here?

Quote:
why chance it? toss'em in the freezer!
Ok… but is there any drawback to doing this? I predominantly use these to toast and then grind with some EVOO to make tahini paste.

And how much longer will they last?
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Old 01-24-2021, 05:04 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
Thanks, but not sure what you mean here?

Ok… but is there any drawback to doing this? I predominantly use these to toast and then grind with some EVOO to make tahini paste.

And how much longer will they last?
A few years ago, my store discontinued selling lots of things in bulk and they put the stock on sale. I bought a few pounds of pine nuts and put them in the freezer; I used the last of them last summer to make pesto. There's no problem doing it and they should last until you use them up.
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Old 01-24-2021, 08:30 PM   #15
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Scott These nuts and grains last pretty much indefinitely when frozen. Still, with things I get a lot of, and I won't use quickly, I put them in vacuum sealed packs. Several years ago I got a deal when a place online put freekah on their clearance list, and had it cheaper than anywhere I had ever seen it - $1.19/lb! So I kept putting 5 lbs at a time in my cart, then 1 lb at a time, until I had all of it - 23 lbs.! I only take out 3 cups at a time, so I packed it in about 30 packs of this size, vacuum sealed all of it, and put it in the freezer. Wild rice is another thing I keep in the freezer, that I forgot to mention - it does go rancid. I had a 2 qt jar on the freezer door, and only take it out as needed, since I seldom use it, then I re-vacuum seal the jar. I've had it for about 8 years, and it's still good. Remember, though the rancidity and other chemical reactions, that make these things go bad, is slowed down greatly in the freezer, it is still taking place, so things can eventually go bad in the freezer. Which is why I go the extra mile, with the Foodsaver. Also, sometimes people have foods that they put in freezers give off aromas. I will never forget the time when I was about 12 years old, when Mom and I cleaned, cooked, and froze a bushel of bell peppers in small bags - the type sandwiches were usually put in. Almost everything in the freezer tasted like peppers, after a couple of months! The oils in nuts absorb things like that! That was one advantage I found of using Foodsaver plastic - even things like garlic, onions, and cinnamon, that permeate just about any plastic bags, do not go through that.

Something that used to get an "off flavor" in less than a year in the freezer, back when I used huge amounts, baking all those cookies every year, was butter. Even in the heavy Ziploc bags, it was slightly old tasting, compared to fresh bought. I tried not to buy much more than I needed at the time (usually 20-25 lbs!), but if I had any older butter, come cookie season, I'd make ghee with it - not noticeable in that. But years later, when I started vacuum sealing butter, I found the butter tasted like I had just bought it, even 2 years later. No oxygen or stray aromas getting to the butter this way. Since I don't use nearly as much now, I don't want to have to run out and buy some every time I want it, and it keeps very well this way.

Oh yeah - there's also that Plugra I stocked up on at less than half price, that keeps until I need it, for some dinner with really good bread!
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Old 01-25-2021, 08:19 AM   #16
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Nice to know Pepper, thanks!
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