"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-14-2017, 12:28 PM   #1
Assistant Cook
 
Ro3bert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: New Fairfield, CT
Posts: 9
Question Cooking Yukon Gold Potatoes

Some weeks ago I did a slow Cooker recipe that called for Gold potatoes. The recipe called for 8 hours on slow.

I'd quartered the potatoes as called for. At the end of the cooking time some of them were still hard and crunchy.

Recently I decided to finish what was left of the potatoes. I microwaved them two or three times but they still had crunchiness just under the skins.

What went wrong? How does one cook them so they come out soft?

Robert

__________________

Ro3bert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 01:41 PM   #2
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,860
I've never had a problem with them, so i can't really help. I've roasted them, boiled them, simmered them in a stew, never had any issues.
__________________

__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 02:04 PM   #3
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,671
You might need to check the temperature of the slow cooker, on low, to see the temperature the potatoes were cooked at. (ending a sentence with a preposition!!) I have heard that potatoes must reach 180 degrees F and another source said they must reach boiling. The low temperature in an older slow cooker might be too low, even for safety. It's probably best to check the temperature. Just put in a couple cups of water, turn it on low, and after an hour, put the thermometer in it.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2017, 03:07 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,189
How long did you microwave them? I do this regularly and it takes 10-15 minutes on high power to cook them completely.

Baked potatoes must reach 210 degrees to be fully cooked. I imagine it's the same for potatoes cooked in other ways.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2017, 01:43 PM   #5
Assistant Cook
 
Ro3bert's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: New Fairfield, CT
Posts: 9
blissful

I'll have to do that. Hadn't thought of doing that.

GotGarlic

Seems to me I'd read potato cooking in a microwave should only take about 4 min. These were microwaved for tree minutes so maybe that was the problem. I didn't think so as the centers were all soft as I'd expected.

I really like Golden Yukon potatoes so was very disappointed. Next time I'll cook them for your suggested time(s). I'll also cook them ahead for whatever recipe calls for them.

Robert
Ro3bert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-20-2017, 04:15 PM   #6
Sous Chef
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: California's Big Valley
Posts: 848
One medium potato might cook in 4 minutes, but the more potatoes, the more time the microwave needs to work. I'm not sure what it means to microwave them two or three times. I would toss in two medium to large potatoes and push in 9 minutes in my microwave.
Oldvine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 09:49 AM   #7
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Microwave cooks from the inside out, which is helpful for something like our friend the potato. I am not usually a fan of microwave cookery, but it seems designed for potatoes, a solid piece of starch, get those molecules a-vibrating.

I with Yukon gold's slice them quite thin and sautee them in butter with some chives.

TBS (E-F)
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 09:53 AM   #8
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,549
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
Microwave cooks from the inside out...

Not so.

Cooking in a microwave is like cooking in an oven. The microwaves heat the outer layer and then the heat transfers inward.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:04 AM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Microwaves are a tricky thing. They create heat by agitation water molecules, so it depends on where the most moisture is. But microwave ovens also only have so much power, so the agitation is limited in a more dense thing being heated. So it's not just inside out, or outside in. But once the energy is created, it transfers to areas of lesser heat.
Does that make any sense?

Btw, imo, Yukon Gold spuds aren't really the best for nuking. They're more waxy than russet/baking type. They're called all purpose potatoes, but I think they lean waxy.

Skin, boil, then squeeze 'em through a ricer. Or cube and boil, and and make a salad.
__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:23 AM   #10
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
Quote:
Originally Posted by buckytom View Post
Btw, imo, Yukon Gold spuds aren't really the best for nuking. They're more waxy than russet/baking type. They're called all purpose potatoes, but I think they lean waxy.
I agree with this up there.

And, totally knew as soon as I hit post, someone would say something like, 'microwave ovens don't really cook from the inside out', Let my comment stand not as a description of the physics of it, but a convenient mental cheat I use to conceptualize the difference between microwave cookery and methods that use a radiant heat source.

TBS (E-F)
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 06:20 PM   #11
Chef Extraordinaire
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Not so.

Cooking in a microwave is like cooking in an oven. The microwaves heat the outer layer and then the heat transfers inward.
+1 Thatís why it is recommended to stir food half way through. To pull the outer heated food to the center and mix with inner under heated food for more even cooking.
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 07:02 PM   #12
Executive Chef
 
Just Cooking's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: Springfield, MO
Posts: 3,667
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
+1 Thatís why it is recommended to stir food half way through. To pull the outer heated food to the center and mix with inner under heated food for more even cooking.
+2

Ross
__________________
Disclaimer: My experiences may not be as someone else might think correct.. Life goes on..
Just Cooking is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 07:46 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,446
Microwaves are only good for reheating left overs..IMHO
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 08:01 PM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
msmofet's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 11,494
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Microwaves are only good for reheating left overs..IMHO
And steaming fresh vegetables without any added water. Perfect every time.
__________________
There is freedom within, there is freedom without
Try to catch the deluge in a paper cup
There's a battle ahead, many battles are lost
msmofet is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 08:39 PM   #15
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,549
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocklobster View Post
Microwaves are only good for reheating left overs..IMHO
Also for making ramen noodles, boiling water, steaming tacos, cooking corn on the cob, poaching eggs, etc.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:34 PM   #16
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
Also for making ramen noodles, boiling water, steaming tacos, cooking corn on the cob, poaching eggs, etc.
And they're great for making steamed white rice, cooking potatoes for salad or mash, heating stock for risotto, etc. It has many uses.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:41 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,189
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
I agree with this up there.

And, totally knew as soon as I hit post, someone would say something like, 'microwave ovens don't really cook from the inside out', Let my comment stand not as a description of the physics of it, but a convenient mental cheat I use to conceptualize the difference between microwave cookery and methods that use a radiant heat source.
Why would you tell someone something you know to be untrue? Your "convenient mental cheat" isn't helpful for people who are trying to understand what's going on.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 10:47 PM   #18
Sous Chef
 
erehweslefox's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2016
Location: Hatfield, PA
Posts: 578
GG, because it is convenient to think of it that way? Do you review particle physics every time you use a microwave?

Not like I am intentionally misleading people here.

TBS (E-F)
__________________
sourdough isn't a recipe, it is a process.
erehweslefox is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 11:13 PM   #19
Certified Pretend Chef
 
Andy M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 46,549
Quote:
Originally Posted by erehweslefox View Post
GG, because it is convenient to think of it that way? Do you review particle physics every time you use a microwave?

Not like I am intentionally misleading people here.

TBS (E-F)


Iím sorry but I donít understand the logic of intentionally looking at a process incorrectly. Whatís the benefit? Once you know itís wrong, there is no benefit to not changing.
__________________
"If you want to make an apple pie from scratch, you must first create the universe." -Carl Sagan
Andy M. is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2017, 11:16 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
buckytom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: My mountain
Posts: 21,539
Well, it does heat from the inside out as opposed to the outside in, in a way of looking at it. Depends on where the water molecules are.

It's about the transfer of specific types of energy.
__________________

__________________
The past is gone it's all been said.
So here's to what the future brings,
I know tomorrow you'll find better things
buckytom is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cook, cooking, potato, potatoes

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:34 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×