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Old 05-22-2020, 02:19 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by powerplantop View Post
I cooked a few eggs in the Navy.

The flat top (griddle) was preheated. Different sections were heated to different temps so that we could cook different things.

Oil was always added to the flat top then moved around with the spatula. This left a thin film of oil on the entire cooking surface. But the eggs were not cooked in a pool of oil.

You should try this.

Crack your eggs into a bowl so that they are ready and inspected for bits of egg shells.

Take your pan put it on a smaller hob put it on low. Add a little oil to you pan. Use a paper towel and ensure all of your pan has a thin film of oil including the sides.

Turn the heat up just a little and tilt the pan slightly to one side.

On the low side add the eggs. This will keep them from spreading out to much. When they start to firm up you can slowly lower the pan back until its flat on the hob.

Use your spatula to make sure the eggs are not stuck to the side of the pan.

When your ready to flip gently get the spatula under the egg and flip.
I do crack one egg at a time into a small bowl prior to putting it into the pan and inspect for shell.

Your tip is to use a tissue to spread oil thinly and evenly across the pan. Won't lots of oil go to waste this way as the tissue would suck it up?
I will try this method.

Currently my eggs get stuck wherever the oil hasn't spread. I tilt the pan after heating the oil before putting eggs in.
I heat the oil because otherwise it is too thick to spread.
BUT it is still too thick to spread properly anyway, so it just runs in thick streaks rather then coating the entire pan when I tilt the pan.

Thanks for your constructive input.

I would love to learn more about your cooking in the navy. Especially about that griddle. How does nothing stick to it as per the navy video I linked to?! It looks like it's stainless steel which is very hard to NOT get things stuck to it.
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Old 05-22-2020, 02:41 PM   #42
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Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post
I will still reply. You cannot heat non stick pans empty to pre heat so it is not possible to use the water temperature test.
Maybe you shouldn't heat your non-stick pan empty. But, the instructions for mine say that you can (with their pans). They even say to heat on medium. But, either you don't read all the replies or you already knew that.
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Old 05-22-2020, 04:45 PM   #43
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I have 2 ScanPans and I don't heat them for any longer than it takes to melt the butter on a low fire. And I don't use metal utensils in them even though it says you can.
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Old 05-23-2020, 04:18 AM   #44
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America's Test Kitchen just uploaded this video about cooking eggs.

Thank you so much. She has a very soothing voice unlike most obnoxiously loud 'YouTuber's' these days. Even foodtuber's are adopting the 'let's be loud and obnoxious so it seems whatever I say is 100% true'.

However. She uses an insane amount of fat. Utterly insane. I think she might be trying to kill someone with that XD. So sadly this is useless for me.

On another note and this applies to anyone in this post to read: I used to have a brand new Tefal cheapo pan. The first week I got it, I could cook eggs on it with NO oil and it would come out PERFECT. No crispy issue.

BUT Tefal coatings are toxic and only last a week or so before they start breaking down. Same applies with any non stick.

Great video though and she goes into details at the end.

PS: Here in the UK eggs are sold on shelves. Not in the fridge. And I do not store my eggs in the fridge.
They are kept on the kitchen counter top in the carton. I think this is what most British people do.
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Old 05-23-2020, 05:29 AM   #45
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It won't let me edit my last post. So I wanted to add, the info that lady gives about egg dates and laid date are only correct for USA. NOT for the UK.
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Old 05-23-2020, 09:21 AM   #46
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I apoplogize. I did see that in the beginning, you did state that you were using a ceramic pan. I just got lost from reading many of the comments. I did a bit of research intol the Greenpan product and found this - https://www.centurylife.org/in-depth...and-greenlife/. It appears to be a good review.

Personally, I have found that ceramic pans are not quite as non-stick as are teflon pans. That being said, they still are pretty easy to clean up. I agree with the author of the link that rather than pouring oil into the pan when hot, use a silicone brush, or paper towel to rub a thin film of oil to complete;y cover the bottom and sides of the pan with a thin film of oil (fat).

Except for my pancake griddle, I use either stainless steel,carbon steel, or cast iron pots and pans, as when well seasoned, They are as non-stick as ceramic, and teflon, but are nearly indestrctable, and much more versatile. I use teflon coated aluminum for my pancake griddle because it eliminates hot spots due to aluminum's heat cinductivity. But then again, I have a heat diffuser that I use with my cast iron pans to do the same on my gas ccoktop.

I really don't know what to tell you that hasn't already been said abojut cooking your fried eggs, except to use fresh eggs as they will hold their shape better and ot be so thin at rhe edges. After that, using a greased (buttered) egg ring, with a lid, or a poaching cup will give you what you want.

Personally, I have been successfully cooking fried eggs since the age of about ten years. I am now almost 65 years of age. I have never had the issues you are having. When I wanted a more delicate egg (softer white with no runny yolk) I placed the egg into the pan, with a little bacon fat, and seasoned it with S & P. I let it cook until the whites started to solidify, added about 2 tbs. water and covered the pan with a lid. I let it cook for another minute and had just what I desired.

K now this about eggs. There are differing stages of firmness that an egg white undergoes when cooking. Th
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Old 05-23-2020, 09:50 AM   #47
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I added more to my post. It took longer thn was allowed under the edit function. Hre is the edited post.
I apologize. I did see that in the beginning, you did state that you were using a ceramic pan. I just got lost from reading many of the comments. I did a bit of research into the Greenpan product and found this - https://www.centurylife.org/in-depth...and-greenlife/. It appears to be a good review.

Personally, I have found that ceramic pans are not quite as non-stick as are Teflon pans. That being said, they still are pretty easy to clean up. I agree with the author of the link that rather than pouring oil into the pan when hot, use a silicone brush, or paper towel to rub a thin film of oil to complete;y cover the bottom and sides of the pan with a thin film of oil (fat).

Except for my pancake griddle, I use either stainless steel,carbon steel, or cast iron pots and pans, as when well seasoned, They are as non-stick as ceramic, and teflon, but are nearly indestrctable, and much more versatile. I use teflon coated aluminum for my pancake griddle because it eliminates hot spots due to aluminum's heat cinductivity. But then again, I have a heat diffuser that I use with my cast iron pans to do the same on my gas ccoktop.

I really don't know what to tell you that hasn't already been said about cooking your fried eggs, except to use fresh eggs as they will hold their shape better and ot be so thin at the edges. After that, using a greased (buttered) egg ring, with a lid, or a poaching cup will give you what you want.

Personally, I have been successfully cooking fried eggs since the age of about ten years. I am now almost 65 years of age. I have never had the issues you are having. When I wanted a more delicate egg (softer white with no runny yolk) I placed the egg into the pan, with a little bacon fat, and seasoned it with S & P. I let it cook until the whites started to solidify, added about 2 tbs. water and covered the pan with a lid. I let it cook for another minute and had just what I desired.

K now this about eggs. There are differing stages of firmness that an egg white undergoes when cooking. The first stage is when the white has solidified and is no longer runny. It is tender, and moist. As you cook it longer, thr proteins crunch up, or tighten up, going from tender to more dry, and eventually, rubbery. After that stage, they begin to become like plastic in texture. After that, they become delicately crispy.

The yolks go from soft and highly flavorful, to semi-soft, with an almost paste-like consistency, to solid, but tender, to dry, to discolored and very dry.

The trick is to get the yolks to the degree of oneness you desire, while getting the whites just right. This should be relatively easy as yolks solidify at a lower temperature than does the white. The problem is that the yolk is in a thick mound, while the wite spreads out. That means tha applied heat will be absorbed more quickly into the white, as it has less material per unit/volume to absorb into. This is again why the egg rings, and poaching cups work so well. They keep the whites as thick as the yolk. However, because the whites are so thick, steam is required to cook from the top down as well as the heat from the cooking surface to ensure that the whites are cooked through.

If you are fillkng your pan with eggs, as you say you are, they shouldn't spread out. abut you need to get a cover for your pan, and add a couple tbs. of water, then cover. You won't need to flip your eggs, and they will be cooked through, both white, and yolk.

If you still can't make this work, learn to poach eggs in salted water, or a poaching pan, ot learn to make boiled eggs. They are both very easy to make.

Possibly, the best way to lear how to make the fried eggs you crave, is to find a friend, or relative who knows how to cook them, and watch what they do. Then do what they do.

Without being at your home, watching what you are doing, we can only give you our advise, and tell you what works for us. And worded descriptions, no matter how detailed, can only tell us so much. You just have to work within the laws of physics, and watch how the egg reacts to thr heat, and cooking techniques you are using, then adjust your technique until you get the results you desire. None of us can do it for you. I would hazard to say that all of us who have given advise, have learned how to cook by trial and error. We learned from both our success, and our failures, and developed our cooking skills after years of practice. I'm afraid you will have to do the same. There are no magic pans, no magic recipes. Like any other skill, be it welding, painting, fishing rod building, skiing, or any other, you just have to do it, and keep on doing it, until you learn to do it properly.

Seeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the No
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Old 05-23-2020, 10:32 AM   #48
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Thanks Chief.
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:00 AM   #49
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I have/had a Greenpan. It has been misplaced. I like the ScanPan better.

Here are several pictures of eggs fried in butter on medium heat uncovered in my ScanPan. These are runny but just cook a little longer before and after the flip.

Click image for larger version

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Old 05-23-2020, 11:03 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newbiecool View Post
I do crack one egg at a time into a small bowl prior to putting it into the pan and inspect for shell.

Your tip is to use a tissue to spread oil thinly and evenly across the pan. Won't lots of oil go to waste this way as the tissue would suck it up?
I will try this method.

Currently my eggs get stuck wherever the oil hasn't spread. I tilt the pan after heating the oil before putting eggs in.
I heat the oil because otherwise it is too thick to spread.
BUT it is still too thick to spread properly anyway, so it just runs in thick streaks rather then coating the entire pan when I tilt the pan.

Thanks for your constructive input.

I would love to learn more about your cooking in the navy. Especially about that griddle. How does nothing stick to it as per the navy video I linked to?! It looks like it's stainless steel which is very hard to NOT get things stuck to it.
Maybe use a pastry brush to spread a thin coating of oil on your pan?
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Old 05-23-2020, 11:09 AM   #51
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Here is a bit of info on flattop grills from Wikipedia (not sure how accurate it is).

Description
The flattop grill is a versatile platform for many cooking techniques such as sauteing, toasting, simmering, shallow frying, stir frying, pan frying, browning, blackening, grilling, baking, braising, and roasting, and can also be used for flambeing. In addition, pots and pans can be placed directly on the cook surface, giving more cooking flexibility. In most cases, the steel cook surface seasons like cast iron cookware, providing a natural non-stick surface. Almost any type of food can be cooked on this type of appliance. In addition to standard barbecue fare like hamburgers, hot dogs and sausages, more delicate items can be cooked on a flattop grill. Omelettes, crepes, paninis, yakisoba noodles, fish tacos, quesadillas, grilled steak, flatbread, pizza, jerk chicken, crab cakes and sauteed vegetables are just a few examples of the wide range of foods that can be prepared on a flattop grill.

Read more >>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flattop_grill
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Old 05-23-2020, 03:36 PM   #52
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You clearly didn't read my post. I stated many times in a few of my posts that I am using THE LOWEST POSSIBLE HEAT SETTING albeit with the largest burner as that is the burner that matches my pan size.
You don't need a large burner for a large pan, a small one works too, the pan should spread the heat.

You need less heat for your eggs.

You can also pick the pan up while the eggs are cooking so the burner isn't continuing to heat the pan, eggs are quick so it shouldn't be that big a deal to hold the pan for a moment or two.
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Old 05-23-2020, 03:54 PM   #53
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You don't need a large burner for a large pan, a small one works too, the pan should spread the heat.

You need less heat for your eggs.

You can also pick the pan up while the eggs are cooking so the burner isn't continuing to heat the pan, eggs are quick so it shouldn't be that big a deal to hold the pan for a moment or two.
^^^ +1
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