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Old 03-06-2020, 04:53 PM   #1
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Crockpot Chili: Dry vs Canned Beans

I'm making my crockpot chili tomorrow... just got back from the store and forgot to buy the 16oz can of S&W chili beans I usually use in this recipe. Not going back for them. I have some dried pinto beans (which are now soaking), and am confident I can spice them up to compare with the S&W beans.

The question is... do I cook them beforehand? My chili runs in the crockpot for 4-6 hours high, or 6-8 hours low. Obviously the S&W beans are cooked. But given the time in the crockpot, do you think it is necessary to cook the beans beforehand, and if so, would the time be less than the usual 1.5 to 2hrs normally required?
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Old 03-06-2020, 05:00 PM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScottinPollock View Post
I'm making my crockpot chili tomorrow... just got back from the store and forgot to buy the 16oz can of S&W chili beans I usually use in this recipe. Not going back for them. I have some dried pinto beans (which are now soaking), and am confident I can spice them up to compare with the S&W beans.

The question is... do I cook them beforehand? My chili runs in the crockpot for 4-6 hours high, or 6-8 hours low. Obviously the S&W beans are cooked. But given the time in the crockpot, do you think it is necessary to cook the beans beforehand, and if so, would the time be less than the usual 1.5 to 2hrs normally required?
They should cook with the chili no problem.
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Old 04-16-2020, 12:28 AM   #3
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Well... If you're trying something new, you shouldn't worry. After a few bad tastes, you'll achieve a magical taste for sure.
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Old 04-16-2020, 12:57 AM   #4
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If your chili includes tomato products, you will need to cook the pinto beans until soft. Add a little salt toe the water to keep the skins from rupturing. The acid from tomatoes, or other chili ingredients will inhibit the beans from softening. Once they are cooked, the chili seasonings will permeate the beans, giving them good flavor.

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Old 04-16-2020, 07:14 PM   #5
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I'll be the beans don't go in the chili guy
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Old 04-17-2020, 05:40 AM   #6
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They should cook with the chili no problem.
I did this once and found the beans to be on the firm side after 8 hours of cooking on low.
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Old 04-17-2020, 11:16 AM   #7
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Depends on how old the beans are. Relatively new beans should be OK, but I've had (actuallyz still have) some old pintos (I bought a 5 lb bag that I couldn't resist the price of, and I don't use them as quickly as the lentils), and they take much longer to cook than they used to, even pressure cooking them.
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Old 04-17-2020, 02:12 PM   #8
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I've been doing a lot of dried beans last year or so.

I definitely find home soaked/cooked beans far superior to canned (mush) beans in any dish.

soaked + crockpot, imho unlikely to work well.
recommend you cook the soaked beans, covered, 2 hrs or so - test the 'al dente' quality before quitting the pre-cook.
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Old 04-17-2020, 04:19 PM   #9
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The other advantage to using dried beans is the price! I still use those mushy canned beans at times, for bean dip - something where it doesn't really matter much.
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