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Old 05-23-2011, 05:07 PM   #1
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Dough Rising, umm NOT!

I tried making pizza dough.
3 1/4 C Flour
1/4 Oilve Oil
Scant 2 Tbsp Of Salt
1 1/2 tsp Sugar
1/4oz pack of active yeast

Was extremely sticky,,needed to add flour to the board when I worked it. I oiled it,put it in a big bowl,covered it and put it in the microwave to let it rise.no,,I did not cook it in the microwave.but it`s been an hr and it doesn`t seem to be rising at all. Why would this be?

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Old 05-23-2011, 05:13 PM   #2
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If you used active dry yeast, It's usually bloomed in warm sugar water before mixing in the oil, salt and flour.

Did you check the expiration date for the yeast?
Was the water too hot - over 110 F?
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Old 05-23-2011, 05:13 PM   #3
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did you use active dry yeast? if you are, you might want to proof it first before adding it to the flour. you'll need to heat up your water to 85 degrees, add some sugar (doesn't need much) and put your yeast in it, and after 10-15 minutes if it foams up at the top then it's alive, otherwise the yeast is dead.

at this point, you can put the dough uncovered in the oven, and also put a bowl of hot water (just reached boiling) in it a little further from the dough. the dough should rise pretty well under this condition if it's still alive.
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Old 05-23-2011, 05:17 PM   #4
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Im sorry I neglected to mention I did proof it and it foamed up.. It could be possible that the water may have been 115 degrees out of the tap.
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:39 PM   #5
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If it foamed up, then that's a good sign. The yeast is good.

If it's cold in your kitchen, it could take a long time to rise.
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Old 05-23-2011, 06:50 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If you used active dry yeast, It's usually bloomed in warm sugar water before mixing in the oil, salt and flour.

Did you check the expiration date for the yeast?
Was the water too hot - over 110 F?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hyperion View Post
did you use active dry yeast? if you are, you might want to proof it first before adding it to the flour. you'll need to heat up your water to 85 degrees, add some sugar (doesn't need much) and put your yeast in it, and after 10-15 minutes if it foams up at the top then it's alive, otherwise the yeast is dead.

at this point, you can put the dough uncovered in the oven, and also put a bowl of hot water (just reached boiling) in it a little further from the dough. the dough should rise pretty well under this condition if it's still alive.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
If it foamed up, then that's a good sign. The yeast is good.

If it's cold in your kitchen, it could take a long time to rise.
Didn`t seem to rise much,,,I tried stretching it into a circle,,but it was very resistant to being stretched,,so I waited another 5 -10 mins still very resistant,..so I don`t know what this means.
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:44 PM   #7
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did you use tap water? I wouldn't use it because of the chlorine that might kill the yeast. I always use mineral water out of bottles
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:57 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scattergun2570 View Post
I tried making pizza dough.
3 1/4 C Flour
1/4 Oilve Oil
Scant 2 Tbsp Of Salt
1 1/2 tsp Sugar
1/4oz pack of active yeast

Was extremely sticky,,needed to add flour to the board when I worked it. I oiled it,put it in a big bowl,covered it and put it in the microwave to let it rise.no,,I did not cook it in the microwave.but it`s been an hr and it doesn`t seem to be rising at all. Why would this be?
It looks like too much salt. Two tablespoons is over twice as much as I use with 4 cups of flour.

Josie
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:05 PM   #9
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did you use tap water? I wouldn't use it because of the chlorine that might kill the yeast. I always use mineral water out of bottles
I believe pizzerias use tap.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:05 PM   #10
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It looks like too much salt. Two tablespoons is over twice as much as I use with 4 cups of flour.

Josie
Salt would affect the elasticity?
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:06 PM   #11
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Salt would affect the elasticity?
no ,too much salt might kill the yeast or keep them from flourishing
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:08 PM   #12
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I believe pizzerias use tap.
well, the point of home cooking is to get better result than pizzerias
honestly, I haven't had any pizza in any pizzeria in the states that I like better than my own. maybe there are good ones, but apparently very few.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:13 PM   #13
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Chlorine in tap water can usually be negated by letting the water sit for a few minutes in a cup.

Some municipalities use methods that this won't work with.

If you are unsure of your tap water testing with some spring water and comparing the difference might tell you if you have too high a chlorine content.
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Old 05-24-2011, 02:45 AM   #14
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Chlorine in tap water can usually be negated by letting the water sit for a few minutes in a cup.

Some municipalities use methods that this won't work with.

If you are unsure of your tap water testing with some spring water and comparing the difference might tell you if you have too high a chlorine content.

Does boiling it get rid of the chlorine?
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:29 AM   #15
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If your yeast and your salt came into direct contact, you might have killed your yeast, or at least slowed it way down. I use tap water for all my bread baking and have never had a problem with it.
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Old 05-24-2011, 02:22 PM   #16
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Poor yeast quality and/or a too cold area. Does your regular oven have a pilot light? Try putting it in the regular oven with the warmth of the pilot light only.
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:05 AM   #17
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Poor yeast quality and/or a too cold area. Does your regular oven have a pilot light? Try putting it in the regular oven with the warmth of the pilot light only.
Will do
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:46 AM   #18
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today I made a pizza dough. For 3 cups of flour I used nearly a tbsp of active dry yeast, proved in warm water, and about 25 minutes of kneading. Then I put the dough in the fridge right afterward. About an hour later I see the dough has nearly doubled.

It proves that even if you don't have a warm place to rise the dough, even in a fridge, it'll still rise. I'll leave the dough in the fridge for 48 hours and then make the pizza.

I do use mineral water every time because I believe yeast will thrive better in this water.
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