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Old 04-02-2020, 09:45 AM   #1
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Dry Pot Roast

Yesterday, I made a pot roast with a half eye round. Browned it well with onions and garlic cloves then added stock brought to a boil on stove, then into a 300F oven for 3 hours. Last hour I added the root vegetables.

Roast was so dry! Like sawdust. Vegetables excellent. If not for the best gravy, it would have been impossible to eat.

So, what did I do wrong? Over cook the eye round? I usually use chuck that has much more fat. So I'm pretty sure its over cooked. What do you guys say?
And what can I do with the remaining roast. I almost trashed it last night, but figured I would ask here first.

Thanks John
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:01 AM   #2
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I think your error was in the cut of meat you used. Eye round is very lean and has little or no connective tissue. You need fat and connective tissue to give you moist pot roast. IMO chuck roast is the best choice for this type of recipe.
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:11 AM   #3
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...eye round...
totally the issue, completely agree.


so, while we're on the cut....
what exactly _is_ an eye round good for?
I stopped buying it years ago . . . because it cooks up like congealed sawdust....
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:20 AM   #4
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That a very good question! What would you use eye round for? I was trying to think when was the last time I've seen it the meat case...

As to the leftover roast... Stroganoff? Something with loads of gravy/sauce
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Old 04-02-2020, 10:50 AM   #5
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I would think that eye round would make good chicken fried steak. If it is cut across the grain and pounded thin, it should be tasty and not dry.
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Old 04-02-2020, 11:19 AM   #6
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msmofet uses it to make very rare roast beef. It looks amazing. Sliced thin, it's what you make Philly cheese steak and deli roast beef with. I keep meaning to try it.
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Old 04-02-2020, 11:28 AM   #7
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Eye round is the only cut I use for roast beef. I use left over eye round and pan gravy to make beef barley soup.

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Old 04-02-2020, 12:04 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Eye round is the only cut I use for roast beef. I use left over eye round and pan gravy to make beef barley soup.

Attachment 40117

Attachment 40116
Do you have a meat slicer?
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Old 04-02-2020, 12:10 PM   #9
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My experience is that it needs to be cooked more on the rare side of the scale rather than the well-done side.

msmofet, that roast looks amazing!!
Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Eye round is the only cut I use for roast beef. I use left over eye round and pan gravy to make beef barley soup.

Attachment 40117

Attachment 40116
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Old 04-02-2020, 12:20 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy M. View Post
I think your error was in the cut of meat you used. Eye round is very lean and has little or no connective tissue. You need fat and connective tissue to give you moist pot roast. IMO chuck roast is the best choice for this type of recipe.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcSaute View Post
...eye round...
totally the issue, completely agree.
so, while we're on the cut....
what exactly _is_ an eye round good for?
I stopped buying it years ago . . . because it cooks up like congealed sawdust....
You are both right.
I always made it roasted rare and sliced thin. My wife hates rare meat.
My grandmother used to make it braised with a Spanish Chorizo (Dried not fresh) shoved into it from both ends. They called it Bolichi. Sorry if my spelling is wrong. It was one of my favorite things as a child.
This is what made me try it. I had no Chorizo.

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Originally Posted by Kaneohegirlinaz View Post
That a very good question! What would you use eye round for? I was trying to think when was the last time I've seen it the meat case...
As to the leftover roast... Stroganoff? Something with loads of gravy/sauce
We see it regularly. I was waiting at Costco for them to grind some beef and saw it in the case. Otherwise it would have never been picked up to start with.
I might just give it to the dog. Little by little. It is extra dry. But our Yorkie is a pig and will eat anything.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
msmofet uses it to make very rare roast beef. It looks amazing. Sliced thin, it's what you make Philly cheese steak and deli roast beef with. I keep meaning to try it.
Yes, thats how I was taught to make it. My ex MIL and ex wife and ex FIL all liked rare beef. It was there I saw how tender it could be. They always used eye round.
Yes, its entirely my mistake.

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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
Do you have a meat slicer?
Yes. Actually it sits in my basement. When my Dad died I got it. Its not a big commercial kind. Its a smaller home use type deal. And why its most likely down there rather than up here.
Of course we would not have room for any slicer up here anymore.
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Old 04-02-2020, 12:37 PM   #11
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i like this guys version for regular stove cooking



and this one for instantpot





with the caveat that pot roast is generally tougher than roast beef (although instantpot breaks it down pretty well).
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Old 04-02-2020, 01:35 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by msmofet View Post
Eye round is the only cut I use for roast beef. I use left over eye round and pan gravy to make beef barley soup.

Attachment 40117

Attachment 40116
If I'm not mistaken, eye of round is also known as inside round. It is good for two things, IMO, rare roast beef, sliced very thin, against the grain, to be served with au jus, or in a number of sandwiches, including Phlly Beef, or corned, and sliced paper thin, again, against the grain.l This corned beef is what is found in deli-corned beef.

Eye of round is also good when smoked to medium rare, or rare, using cherry, apple, white oak, maple, or alder. Again, hte key to good eye of round is rare to medium rare, and slicing paper-thin against the grain, like MsMoffet does.

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Old 04-02-2020, 04:12 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by GimmeAnother1 View Post
and this one for instantpot

with the caveat that pot roast is generally tougher than roast beef (although instantpot breaks it down pretty well).
Is a rump roast the same as an eye round? If it's as lean as an eye round, no matter how much you cook it, it will never be tender, like a pot roast should be. It's just not the right cut for braising or pressure cooking. Pot roast made with a chuck roast is fall-apart tender, juicy and delicious, as it should be.
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Old 04-02-2020, 05:37 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
msmofet uses it to make very rare roast beef. It looks amazing. Sliced thin, it's what you make Philly cheese steak and deli roast beef with. I keep meaning to try it.

oh dear.... I would suggest not mentioning that thought to Gino or Pat
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Old 04-02-2020, 05:45 PM   #15
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Quote:
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Do you have a meat slicer?
Nope. I slice it by hand as thin as possible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveSoMD View Post
My experience is that it needs to be cooked more on the rare side of the scale rather than the well-done side.

msmofet, that roast looks amazing!!
Thank you Dave.
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Old 04-02-2020, 05:48 PM   #16
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oh dear.... I would suggest not mentioning that thought to Gino or Pat
Shrug
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Old 04-02-2020, 06:26 PM   #17
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msmofet uses it to make very rare roast beef. It looks amazing. Sliced thin, it's what you make Philly cheese steak and deli roast beef with. I keep meaning to try it.

I believe deli roast beef is made with top round, not the eye.Some of the famous cheesesteak shops use thinly sliced ribeye.

The eye is a relative smaller cut, maybe 4"-5" across and shaped like a tenderloin.
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Old 04-02-2020, 06:47 PM   #18
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I believe deli roast beef is made with top round, not the eye.Some of the famous cheesesteak shops use thinly sliced ribeye.

The eye is a relative smaller cut, maybe 4"-5" across and shaped like a tenderloin.
Yes, Andy, you are correct. I was thinking of the larger top round (not the same as an inside round as I had previously mentioned). The Baron of beef is usually a top Sirloin Roast and is cooked the same way, slow and low until rare to medium rare, then sliced thin, against the grain. Sorry about erroneously punting out bad info.

Thanks for the correction, Andy.

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Old 04-03-2020, 07:05 AM   #19
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ShopRite and other supermarkets around here sell sliced Eye Round roast beef (regular and Italian varieties) at the deli case.
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Old 04-03-2020, 09:32 AM   #20
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What kind of pan did you use? On small roasts I like my heavy dishes with a lid I find the thinner roast pans burn or dry out quicker
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