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Old 10-07-2006, 07:34 AM   #1
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Garlic powder nutrients?

These powder packages do not carry a fact sheet. Do garlic powder have significant nutrients? How does the garlic powder fare with the real thing in terms of nutrients? How long can I keep the garlic powder in a container on the shelf? It is not listed on the package. I have searched and the results vary greatly. From half a year, one year, two years. Which is the accurate one?

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Old 10-07-2006, 07:39 AM   #2
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I don't believe spices and herbs are required to have nutritional data on them. The amounts used per serving would be almost infinitesimal so reallly of no consequence to your diet profile.
I think they last as long as they last on your shelf but their strength/flavor will diminish and in the case of garlic powder, it may cake badly. So I would replace after 6 months or so. Buy in small quantities at a bulk food store and replenish more often.
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Old 10-07-2006, 10:31 AM   #3
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You can keep it unrefrigerated forever. However, over time, the flavor will diminish and you'll have to use more to get results.
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Old 10-07-2006, 10:46 AM   #4
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I'm in total agreement with what everyone else has said. However, since everyone in my house considers garlic to be one of the major food groups, garlic in any form doesn't last very long here. I don't use a whole lot of garlic powder because I much prefer the flavor fresh garlic provides in my cooking. And, to put things in perspective, there are only two of us here and we use at least one whole head of garlic per week. Sometimes more.

If you plan to keep garlic powder for any length of time be sure to store it away from a heat source and keep the container tightly closed. Think of your spices as fine wine. Actually some of them, such as saffron, can cost as much as a fine wine. Store in a cool dry place.
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Old 10-07-2006, 02:11 PM   #5
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Do the real garlics lose flavor over time? How long do they last until they are considered spoiled? I do not have any place considered dark enough to keep garlics, would keeping them in a light proof container work the same way? Does it even require oxygen? What if it starts sprouting, would it still retain its flavor or be good for consumption? Also, wondering, why does chopped garlic turn greenish when steamed?
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Old 10-07-2006, 02:16 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anticuchos
Do the real garlics lose flavor over time? How long do they last until they are considered spoiled? I do not have any place considered dark enough to keep garlics, would keeping them in a light proof container work the same way? Does it even require oxygen? What if it starts sprouting, would it still retain its flavor or be good for consumption? Also, wondering, why does chopped garlic turn greenish when steamed?
There are garlic containers made specifically for storing garlic - they DO contain air holes, which is imperative in storing garlic. Your garlic may collect moisture and get moldy otherwise. Fresh garlic can last for a couple weeks if stored properly. You will know when it's bad. It will either be really hard or really squishy. If the green sprouts are big just cut them out. The garlic turning green I believe is a chemical reaction with the container you are steaming them in.
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Old 10-07-2006, 03:01 PM   #7
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Thanks for the garlic keeper suggestion. I never knew there was such a thing. Or would have thought it had a functional purpose if I saw one. You mentioned "If the green sprouts are big just cut them out." But this site says, "If garlic begins to sprout or go soft then it is past its prime. Throw it out." (Just found out about the site while searching for the "garlic containers.") I was steaming the garlic in a stainless steel pot. So is the greenish chopped garlic safe for consumption after going through the chemical reaction? By the way, I was reading about botulism. Why would anyone keep garlic in oil?! I do not even know anything kept in oil.
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Old 10-07-2006, 04:00 PM   #8
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Garlic is kept in oil to make a flavoring of garlic oil.
Garlic keeps fine on the counter. mMine goes "bad" by just drying up. It is cheap--just get more.
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Old 10-07-2006, 04:25 PM   #9
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If it is poisonous, why would people add garlic to oil for flavoring?!
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Old 10-07-2006, 05:01 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anticuchos
If it is poisonous, why would people add garlic to oil for flavoring?!
Garlic is not poisonous. If it were, half of Europe would have died already. What CAN cause a "poisonous situation" is when fresh garlic is placed in oil and them little 'ole bacteria get a workin ' - THEN you might get botulism , in some cases . There was a famous case of this in the US sometime recently, and now everyone thinks garlic in oil is dangerous. I've been making it for years and years, and have never, ever had problems with it.

My garlic, incidentally, is kept in an open earthenware dish in a dark place in the cupboard. I'd venture to say it lasts longer than two weeks - I've had some there for a month and it's fine. However, I generally use a kilogram or two per week, so it doesn't have much chance of going off!!
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Old 10-07-2006, 06:05 PM   #11
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I'll agree clive - I can keep mine longer too but I've never really tried to "time" it

You can flavor olive oil with fresh herbs (basil is a favorite then I make basil lemon chicken). I have flavored olive oil with garlic before but I only let it marinate for a few days. Lots of garlic to a little olive oil. Basil and garlic is a great thing too as is rosemary and garlic. Any of your herbs, as long as they are clean and DRY can be marinated for a short time in oil. Then I remove the herbs and use in a matter of a few days.

There are ways to get around the garlic in olive oil with the use of some sort of citric acid but I haven't ventured out that far yet.
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Old 10-07-2006, 06:28 PM   #12
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We love garlic. I use fresh when I have it, but it doesn't keep to well for me.
We use a LOT of jarred minced garlic. I know a lot of you don't care for it, but we don't have a problem with it. I also use granulated garlic fairly often. I prefer it to garlic powder, as it doesn't draw moisture as easily, and I think it has more taste.
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Old 10-08-2006, 05:28 AM   #13
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So if my garlic starts sprouting should I keep it (but the the green off like Elf said) or chuck it out like the URL I posted in Page 1 says? Also, I am still concerned over this part:
Quote:
Also, wondering, why does chopped garlic turn greenish when steamed?
Quote:
The garlic turning green I believe is a chemical reaction with the container you are steaming them in.
Quote:
I was steaming the garlic in a stainless steel pot. So is the greenish chopped garlic safe for consumption after going through the chemical reaction?
Does anyone know the answer to it?
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Old 10-08-2006, 10:16 AM   #14
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If the green sprouts bother you, remove them from the clove and use the remainder. They are harmless. The URL tells you to toss them because it can effect the taste if used. The colors in the garlic are totally harmless and are the result of a chemical reaction in an acidic environment.
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Old 10-08-2006, 10:27 AM   #15
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have a read here, you`ll see that the garlic color is Not a problem beyond aesthetics :)

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...or-26016.html?

Anthocyanins are perfectly harmless and have a range of colors.
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Old 10-08-2006, 01:39 PM   #16
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anticuchos - ok, I did an experiment. I pulled out a small stem and tasted it. It was at first bitter/peppery then the garlic taste kicked in. If the stems are small by all means just cut them up and use them if you are cooking with them. If, however you are going to be using them raw cut in half (tip to tip) and remove the stem.

For an older garlic where, if you cut the clove in half from tip to tip, the stem takes up more space than the white garlic I will usually throw it away UNLESS I don't have anymore then I totally remove the big green sprout/stem and use the rest. It just denotes an older piece of garlic that may have lost some of it's flavor.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it! ...and now I'm going to have garlic breath all day!
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Old 10-08-2006, 03:55 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kitchenelf
...and now I'm going to have garlic breath all day!
thank you, elfie, for your sacrifice in the interest of research. You admins are the best.
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:46 PM   #18
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Let me tell you that I've never STEAMED garlic in my life. I'd have thought it would make the garlic a little wimpy in flavour.i.e. - on a flavour scale of 1 - 10: Steamed Garlic = 1.2

now to address your specific questions: ( which Kitchenelf has already answered):

1)Also, wondering, why does chopped garlic turn greenish when steamed?

A chemical reaction.Copper turns green in certain chemical processes.

2) The garlic turning green I believe is a chemical reaction with the container you are steaming them in.

Quod erat demostrandum.

3) I was steaming the garlic in a stainless steel pot. So is the greenish chopped garlic safe for consumption after going through the chemical reaction?

Yes.What were you steaming the garlic in, apart from the pot? A bamboo steamer? Or something else?

Again, I reiterate my initial rejection of steamed garlic. Fried - yes. Poached - yes. Baked - yes. Grilled - yes. Steamed...
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:53 PM   #19
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why would you steam garlic?why?
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Old 10-08-2006, 07:58 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomchef
why would you steam garlic?why?
I don't think garlic was the only thing being steamed here. I assume it was to add some flavor to some other steamed vegetable maybe? Like steamed zucchini or squash - it was used to flavor at the time of steaming.

When I steam either one of these veggies I also use some onion - I never thought about garlic though.
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