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Old 12-18-2019, 09:27 PM   #61
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Roux White Sauce

Roux White Sauce


ingredients: butter, all purpose flour, milk


lessons learned: 1. whisk whisk whisk....just keep whisking. when you think your done whisk a little more smile.



taste/result: awesome! gonna use this instead of ricotta on lasagna and see how it goes. very versatile sauce especially on pastas. add cheese like cheddar for added flavor.
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Old 12-19-2019, 11:48 AM   #62
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Bagels

Bagels



ingredients: bread flour, sugar, yeast, salt, water, egg wash, poppy seeds


lessons learned: 1. should let proof before refrigerating. i put mine in fridge right away after making dough and after cooking was a bit chewy. proof up to 2 hours before putting in fridge. fridge up to 8 hours is good. so basically make the night before you want to cook. 2. couple different styles to forming bagel. i did the basic poke your finger through middle and work the hole. prof typically roll long like pretzel and wrap around to make circle. 3. i did egg wash many prof places don't do that. they just use water. water good enough to stick on poppy seeds. 4. some places boil and then bake and some places just bake in oven with steam.


taste/result: came out great although my bottoms were brown/over cooked. the same thing happened on my pretzels. have to figure it out at some point. also it was a little chewy. brought to bagel place and we determined it was because i didn't proof long enough before putting in fridge overnight. other than those small things it came out just like the bagel shops. in fact i think the egg wash was a little step up from just watering.
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Old 12-20-2019, 03:02 PM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GimmeAnother1 View Post
Tempering in a microwave example

https://youtu.be/7MwjSUdcFI0

...
Funny that I saw another video today about tempering chocolate in the microwave. But, to my surprise, it talks about getting to a different temperature, not 34 degrees, but 93 degrees. Eventually the penny dropped. The Brit was talking about degrees Celsius and the Yank was talking about degrees Fahrenheit. 34C = 93F. The part about tempering chocolate starts at about 5:42.

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Old 12-20-2019, 11:54 PM   #64
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Funny that I saw another video today about tempering chocolate in the microwave. But, to my surprise, it talks about getting to a different temperature, not 34 degrees, but 93 degrees. Eventually the penny dropped. The Brit was talking about degrees Celsius and the Yank was talking about degrees Fahrenheit. 34C = 93F. The part about tempering chocolate starts at about 5:42.





Yea tempering chocolate is one of the areas I have nowhere near mastered yet. In fact if it works for me I believe it is more like accident than on purposes. Gotta keep trying though!!!!
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Old 12-21-2019, 02:09 AM   #65
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Yea tempering chocolate is one of the areas I have nowhere near mastered yet. In fact if it works for me I believe it is more like accident than on purposes. Gotta keep trying though!!!!
Have you tried the microwave method? Both of those videos make it sound like the science is there to make it work every time, if you just follow the instructions carefully.
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Old 12-21-2019, 01:41 PM   #66
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Lots of mouth watering dishes in this thread, Gimme! I'm impressed!
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Old 12-22-2019, 02:49 PM   #67
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Have you tried the microwave method? Both of those videos make it sound like the science is there to make it work every time, if you just follow the instructions carefully.


I have but not successfully. :(
I will keep trying though because the full way of doing it is very labor intensive imo.
If I do successfully I will post back here and let u know how I was able to pull it off :)
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Old 12-22-2019, 02:53 PM   #68
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Lots of mouth watering dishes in this thread, Gimme! I'm impressed!

Thank you bbqcoder! Loving the culinary journey...amazing to make all the things we take for granted eating on a daily basis and even more amazing to be able to make the things we wouldnt normally come across in our region of the world to eat. :)
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Old 12-29-2019, 01:37 AM   #69
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Bombolini (Italian Donuts)

Bombolini (Italian Donuts)


ingredients: milk, yeast, eggs/egg yolk, lemon zest, sugar, kosher salt, ap flour, butter, frying oil, nutella, red rasberry jam, grape concord jam. drizzle - melted butter, powdered sugar, vanilla extract, heavy cream, whole milk.


lessons learned: 1. dough rises twice. once for main dough and 2nd after you cut/shape the donut balls. 2. this type is a little more doughy than regular american doughnuts. slightly more dense and chewy. 3. glaze right away after frying. let them cool a little in glaze before transferring to baking sheet/rack for drying. 4. poke holes with knife before filling with nozzle. makes it easier. 5. fill by feel. the donut will blow up if you put too much in and start cracking. better to fill by feel and pull out as you go to fill. wipe when done. 6. while i used red rasberry and concord grape jam as well as nutella, many people use a pastry creme for this type of donut/filling. all taste equally good in their own way!
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Old 12-29-2019, 06:03 PM   #70
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Spaghetti with Meatballs and Sausage

Spaghetti with Meatballs and Sausage


ingredients: sauce - puree san marzano tomatoes, whole peeled san marzano tomatoes, tomato paste, sweet onions, bay leaves, oregano, parsley, olive oil. meatballs - 85/15 ground beef, parmesian reggiano, parsley, italian seasoning, onion, egg. sausage - premio sweet italian.


lessons learned: 1. takes a long time and a lot of work. all in all about 4 hours of constant work start to finish. 1.5 when breaking down whole peeled tomatoes remove the stems. 2. meatballs were not solid 1st batch. made them more compact for 2nd batch so they didn't break up as much. wound up breaking some of 1st batch up and using as meat sauce. use ice cream scooper to help consistent sizing. 3. brown all meat in cast iron skillet if you can. great flavor for browning. did this separate to sauce and added to sauce after cooked. 4. saute onions separate in some olive oil for 20+ min to break them down before adding to the sauce/meatballs. 5. after a couple of hours simmering feel free to add some water if sauce is reducing too much.


result/taste: Awesome! took my grandmother's recipe and slightly modified but all in all just a great sauce and meat.
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Old 12-29-2019, 07:10 PM   #71
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Looks really good. I've been roasting meatballs in the oven for years now. It's much easier not to have to babysit them on the stove and get all spattered with grease and you're free to do other things while they're cooking. 375F for 20 minutes.
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Old 12-29-2019, 08:23 PM   #72
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Looks really good. I've been roasting meatballs in the oven for years now. It's much easier not to have to babysit them on the stove and get all spattered with grease and you're free to do other things while they're cooking. 375F for 20 minutes.


Can I put them on a wire rack so the heat goes all around?
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Old 12-30-2019, 01:49 AM   #73
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Chimichurri Sauce


ingredients: olive oil, garlic, parsley, oregano, cilantro, black pepper, cumin, salt, red pepper flakes, honey


lessons learned: 1. honey for me really makes it on this version. 2. pulse not blend when combining. 3. oil is the main liquid so add as you go to get the right consistency.



taste/result: good version with the honey giving and added flavor imo. also have substituted agave and works well too.

Hi Gimme. I'm enjoying this thread a lot.

I'm interested in adding honey to my Chimichurri Sauce but I don't see vinegar (or any acid) in your ingredient list.

Would you mind posting your recipe please? TIA
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Old 12-30-2019, 09:41 AM   #74
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GimmeAnother1 Food Thread

Sorry yes red wine vinegar was used. Forgot to list it. here is the original. I modified it a little by using cilantro as well as parsley. I add a small pinch oregano (just a few flakes) and a very small amount of cumin (these are optional. Try first without and then try with and see between the 2 which u favor). I also heat it up a little with red pepper flakes.

Chimichurri Sauce
1 bunch Italian parsley, leaves only or about 2 cups
2 sprigs rosemary, leaves only
6 cloves garlic, peeled
1⁄4 cup red wine vinegar
1⁄2 teaspoon kosher salt
1⁄4 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon honey
3⁄4 cup olive oil

Put parsley, rosemary, garlic, red wine vinegar, salt, pepper and honey in the food processor. Pulse until herbs are chopped coarsely. While on a continuous pulse, pour olive oil until well blended. Check seasoning and adjust as needed.
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Old 12-30-2019, 11:36 AM   #75
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Interesting. The chimichurri recipe I use has more vinegar than olive oil in it. Since it was designed to be served with beef, I like the more acidic flavor better. I do like the idea of adding a little honey, to balance the acidity.
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Old 12-30-2019, 11:44 AM   #76
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Interesting. The chimichurri recipe I use has more vinegar than olive oil in it. Since it was designed to be served with beef, I like the more acidic flavor better. I do like the idea of adding a little honey, to balance the acidity.


While the red wine vinegar is a staple and a must I find the hidden secret is the honey addition. Brings a whole new depth of flavor imo. Ive substituted agave also and works fine as well.
And yes this is for steak. Change ratios to suite your taste.
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Old 12-30-2019, 11:46 AM   #77
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While the red wine vinegar is a staple and a must I find the hidden secret is the honey addition. Brings a whole new depth of flavor imo. Ive substituted agave also and works fine as well.
I'll give it a try next time we have steak. I have about five gallons of honey in the house right now. Always looking for more ways to use it
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Old 12-30-2019, 12:29 PM   #78
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Thanks for the recipe Gimme. Like GG, I use more red wine vinegar and the balance of honey sounds interesting. Instead of the pepper flakes, I use some diced fresh Serrano chili that has been deveined and seeded. I fell in love this condiment in Argentina.
Nothing like it with steak.
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Old 12-30-2019, 12:53 PM   #79
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Shouldn't the chimichurri recipe have its own thread?
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Old 12-30-2019, 01:24 PM   #80
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Shouldn't the chimichurri recipe have its own thread?

Yes it should, so it doesn't get lost. Both GG and I have our chimi recipes posted under condiments..
Condiments - Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums
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