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Old 05-23-2011, 07:27 PM   #1
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Hard to Stretch the dough

So its impossible to stretch into a pizza,,what can cause this?

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Old 05-23-2011, 07:34 PM   #2
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Is the dough cold? Try letting it rest at room temp for 30 minutes or so. The dough will relax and be easier to stretch.
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:37 PM   #3
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Either not enough oil or not enough water, or both. Bread dough of any kind is subject to change depending on the humidity. Altering the recipe as much a 1/4 cup of liquid may need to be added, depending on the feel of the dough. Experience will guide you in the future as to what the pizza dough should feel like before attempting to roll it out. It should easily stretch but not tear when it's the proper texture. If it snaps back when you stretch it, let it rest for 5 to 10 minutes then work it again.

Bread can be difficult at times if you don't follow the recipe precisely, but keep in mind that baking your bread on a damp or rainy afternoon could yield different results than if you baked on a dry, winter morning. It's all in the feel.
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:42 PM   #4
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Either not enough oil or not enough water, or both. Bread dough of any kind is subject to change depending on the humidity. Altering the recipe as much a 1/4 cup of liquid may need to be added, depending on the feel of the dough. Experience will guide you in the future as to what the pizza dough should feel like before attempting to roll it out. It should easily stretch but not tear when it's the proper texture. If it snaps back when you stretch it, let it rest for 5 to 10 minutes then work it again.

Bread can be difficult at times if you don't follow the recipe precisely, but keep in mind that baking your bread on a damp or rainy afternoon could yield different results than if you baked on a dry, winter morning. It's all in the feel.
I tried waiting 10 mins,,but the dough just kept snapping back into it`s original size. The recipe was 1 1/4c water & 1/4c of oil flour is 3 1/4c...sound like that`s in the ballpark?
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:47 PM   #5
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your recipe sounds fine. when your dough is hard to stretch, let it rest in oven (not turned on) with another bowl of very hot water. let it rest for 30 minutes and you'll get a good soft dough ready to be shaped. Note that when you have a well rested dough, DO NOT knead it or it'll be hardened again
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Old 05-23-2011, 07:47 PM   #6
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My Pizza dough recipe has:

3 cups (16 ounces) high-gluten flour, plus more flour for rolling out.
1-1/4 cups warm water
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 pkg. instant rise yeast
1 teaspoon salt

Mine uses less oil, but besides that, yours seems to be close. Again, the recipe will get you very close, but going by the softness of the final dough is the only way to tell for certain.

Beyond this, I'm at a loss.
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:41 PM   #7
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Yes whenever this has happened to me it is either because of too cool a temperature, too little time for the yeast to react, or a add in a combination of my own impatience.
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Old 05-23-2011, 08:53 PM   #8
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Yes whenever this has happened to me it is either because of too cool a temperature, too little time for the yeast to react, or a add in a combination of my own impatience.

I waited 90 mins for it to rise,,is this insufficient?
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Old 05-23-2011, 09:45 PM   #9
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I also found that working the dough gently will help you stretch it more easily. The quicker you try to grab and stretch, the more elastic those glutens become.
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Old 05-23-2011, 10:20 PM   #10
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If all else fails use that rolling pin....lol...
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Old 05-23-2011, 11:46 PM   #11
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I really want to make a cheesy joke, but I'll refrain.

Did your dough make it into a pizza?
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Old 05-24-2011, 06:17 AM   #12
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I use the "over the knuckles" method. Make your round then make a fist and place the round over it. Make a fist with your other hand an place it under the dough round and gently pull outward and spin. It takes some practice but it will work.
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Old 05-24-2011, 07:29 AM   #13
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For me, letting it rest for awhile will help. Also pressing with the fist rather than stretching. And as has been mentioned, the oil helps.
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Old 05-24-2011, 08:25 AM   #14
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Make your dough the night before and leave it in the fridge to rise. About an hour before you want to make the pizza, flatten the dough out a little and leave it in a warm place.

Bet you won't have any trouble with that.

Rolling pin works if you want the thin, 'cracker' type crust.
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:06 AM   #15
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I really want to make a cheesy joke, but I'll refrain.

Did your dough make it into a pizza?

Negative, I dumped it. Will be attempting it again on Sunday
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:08 AM   #16
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Make your dough the night before and leave it in the fridge to rise. About an hour before you want to make the pizza, flatten the dough out a little and leave it in a warm place.

Bet you won't have any trouble with that.

Rolling pin works if you want the thin, 'cracker' type crust.
That advice seems odd,, everyone else seems to say I need some warmth
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Old 05-28-2011, 01:48 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sparrowgrass View Post
Make your dough the night before and leave it in the fridge to rise. About an hour before you want to make the pizza, flatten the dough out a little and leave it in a warm place.

Bet you won't have any trouble with that.

Rolling pin works if you want the thin, 'cracker' type crust.
That advice seems odd,, everyone else seems to say I need some warmth
I suggest you to watch Good Eats Flat is Beautiful episode. AB explains how yeast grows in cold condition.
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Old 05-28-2011, 09:24 PM   #18
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I suggest you to watch Good Eats Flat is Beautiful episode. AB explains how yeast grows in cold condition.

Are you saying to put it in the fridge for the first rise,or the second?
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Old 05-28-2011, 10:22 PM   #19
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There have been a few times that my dough has ended up this way. Usually its when a child of mine lifts the towel while its rising(I let it rise in an oiled glass bowl on top of a warm stove covered with a warm moist tea towel). However, when that has happened I put the dough in a round pan and turn it into a deep dish b/c I obviously cant get the dough to stretch BUT I can get it to hold on the sides of the pan and it of course has a thick middle.
If nothing you can figure out made it this way, try again when the weather is different then it was today for you.
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Old 05-28-2011, 11:06 PM   #20
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Are you saying to put it in the fridge for the first rise,or the second?
There's only one rise for pizza usually. If you do want a second rise (not because you "have to", but when you see the bubbles from the first rise has become crazy and uneven. Then you punch out the bubbles, fold it a couple of times, shape back into a ball and do a second rise), you can do both in the fridge. My cold rising time is at least 24 hours. Max is 48 hours.

after your final rise (first or second), you divide the dough while it's still cold. Now it'll need to get back to room temperature in order to be elastic. To do that, you let the divided dough rise again in a warm place. then you can shape the pizza.

you really should watch that episode. It might not be the kind you are expecting, but definitely worth trying out his recipe (remember to cut the salt by half, he tends to use too much salt very often)
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