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Old 10-17-2021, 12:48 PM   #1
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Lightbulb Insights on dried bean curd..?

what are some insights that you have about dried bean curd and how to prepare it right?


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Old 10-17-2021, 02:27 PM   #2
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This post is my introduction to dried bean curd. Did some research on it. It's made by removing the skin that forms on heated soy milk, and drying it in sheets, or bundles. It is said to have a meaty texture, and absorb the flavors of foods that it is cooked with. I found this interesting recipe on Google - https://www.seriouseats.com/seriousl...-sticks-recipe.

It sound very interesting. Is it available in grocery stores?

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Old 10-17-2021, 06:19 PM   #3
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The only version I have had of dried tofu is the sheets (and only a couple of times), though I know there are many more, in Asian markets. As Chief noted, that really isn't dried tofu, despite the name.

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Old 10-17-2021, 06:51 PM   #4
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Im not sure if the OP is referring to dried tofu, which is basically dehydrated tofu/ maybe pressed. It often has flavors infused in it, like a five spice powder or other asian flavors, although I have had it plain too. Much firmer than tofu, holds up really well in stir fries, but due to its density , it doesn't absorb flavors as regular tofu does.

As far as the dried tofu sheets, which I think it is called Yuba , although I could be wrong. its is made by simmering soy milk, asa it cools aa film forms on the top of the soy milk. It is usually dried one of 2 ways. One , as a sheet . It is picked up with a long stick and the sheet is left to dry. The other ways it is kind made into , for lack of better works, a stick - like shape ( its kinda the sheets condensed / squished together so it folds up on itself causing this shape.

Both the sheet and 'sticks' need to be hydrated before use so they aren't crunch and are pliable. Although, I have seen them in a ' fresh form' at the Asian market. Kinda like the difference between fresh pasta and dried pasta

The sheets are often used to wrap things up, kinda like an egg roll. It Has a chewy consistency ( when hydrated).

The sticks Ive had in stirfrys and as pieces in vegetarian hot and sour soup. Again, it is a chew like consistency .

Both taste absolutely nothing like tofu.

If the OP is referring to something else, then Im not sure, but the above are the two that he may be referring too.

Ive also seen , in vegetarian/ vegan recipes, when they are making ' fake turkey or chicken', at the end, a layer of hydrated Yuba sheets is tossed over the " turkey, loaf .." and baked a little longer, resembling a ' skin'

***Pic on bottom is that actual 'Dried Tofu'. The others are Yuba ( sheets or sticks)***

Look up stuffed Yuba sheet rolls... to get more ideas of what you can do.

I once had the sheets were hydrated with a sweet soy sauce, then a layer of soy asian marinated shiitakes placed inside then rolled up. They called it " vegetarian duck'. which clearly it wasnt had no resemblance what so ever, but it sure tasted good.
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Old 10-17-2021, 06:54 PM   #5
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Here is a pic of the mushroom stuffed rolls

cooking with these ( the sheets ) are a little technique sensitive . Kinda like using rice paper when making rolls in them.

There is a fine line between not hydrated enough and hydrated too much.
If not enough its crispy and it will break apart when trying to work with it. If hydrated too much, will just fall apart.

The sticks are much more durable, but harder to be creative with.

I never actually tried the recipe of the link below, but it looks about right

http://susanssavourit.blogspot.com/2...-cold-and.html
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Old 10-18-2021, 02:50 PM   #6
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After seeing the thread, inspired me to go to the Asian market again ( havent been there in about 1 month). I took a few pics of what I talked about earlier. The Dried tofu sheets, the sticks ( which they call threads) ( Both of these are dried to the point where they are crisp, brittle and need to be rehydrated with some form of liquid. They are not used in the dry brittle state ( as far as I know).

The other is the dried tofu, which in my opinion is likely pressed, not dried. IF drying implied that liquid is removed, then yes, it is dryer than typical tofu, But to me, it seems like a pressed product relatively firm ( not gelatinous like regular tofu), and often flavored/ marinated . Hold up really well in stirfrys, but doesn't absorb flavor as typical tofu would.
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Old 10-18-2021, 04:10 PM   #7
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Very informational Larry, I've never used yuba. When I checked the price it was about $15/lb, and when I checked amazon it was a similar price only less if buying 3 lbs. (dry) When you were at the asian store, do you recall the pricing, approximately?
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Old 10-18-2021, 06:46 PM   #8
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I dont remember but I think the bag on the left ( the threads/ sticks ) were about $4

I just remembered the woman threw the receipt in the box and I just checked it and was I wrong. It was actually $7.50 for 14oz

I remember it used to about 4$
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Old 10-19-2021, 11:32 AM   #9
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Thanks Larry, I was thinking the asian store might be the best bet for a better price for the dried yuba. I'll keep that in mind next time we go to one. That's still half what my grocery store sells it for.
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Old 10-19-2021, 02:37 PM   #10
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Yeah, the Asian market by me is usually reasonable. I haven't really paid much attention the prices, cause its the only game in town, so I dont have much choice. But when I go into a cities Chinatown, I always search around for deals ( and new weird stuff to try)
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Old 10-19-2021, 10:54 PM   #11
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fresh bean curd is much much better


anyway. when it comes to dried ones. i like the 'wings' shape (easier to soak and prepare).


do all dried bean curds come from china?
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Old 10-20-2021, 06:05 PM   #12
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I would assume it could be found in any country where Tofu is a staple in their diet historically ( Japan, China and other Asian countries), since it is basically a byproduct of the tofu making process.

The store I go to is owned and run by a Chinese family, so I assume theirs is Chinese based.
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Old 10-21-2021, 07:10 PM   #13
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I can understand that it is found in markets of countries where tofu is a food source. I don't really understand why you are saying it is a by product of tofu, but maybe it is, I don't know.


When I make soymilk, I do it for soy milk, or tofu, or save some for soy milk, and use some for tofu. Yuba is dried 'milk skin' but maybe there's more to the story? Milk skin like found on hot chocolate, or pudding, is similar in cow's milk products and also soy milk products. The soy milk is brought almost to boiling, the proteins and fats with some carbs, goes to the top, evaporation happens and a skin is on the top. That is removed and dried for yuba. I only did that once, it was a huge pain and I didn't have anywhere to dry it, so I didn't make it. If I made it then it would be very inexpensive.



Organic soybeans, non-gmo can be found for a little over $1/lb. So for $1.40 I can make 5 pints of rich soy milk and about 1.5 lbs of tofu. It's a little time consuming and messy but every month or two, I put some together. I've only done it a couple of times but I like to make it, then freeze the soy milk (which does change it's consistency but fine for cooking) and use and freeze the extra tofu (freezes fine). We're not using very much of it.
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Old 10-21-2021, 07:58 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
I can understand that it is found in markets of countries where tofu is a food source. I don't really understand why you are saying it is a by product of tofu, but maybe it is, I don't know.
You're correct, I should have said soy milk instead of tofu.

When I make my own tofu, I start by making my own soy milk, and sure enough, a film forms over the surface. So for me, its kind of a byproduct since Im going through the whole process from bean to tofu. But making tofu is similar to making cheese as you are curdling the milk and collecting/ pressing the solids.

And I removed any skin that forms at the surface of the milk prior to curdling it.
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Old 10-22-2021, 05:43 PM   #15
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Unsure how this relates to the original post but been trying to buy tempeh for a long time but has never been available in the store. A home delivery shopper recently brought me a package by accident.

Is tempeh, while cultured, related to dry bean curd?
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Old 10-22-2021, 06:45 PM   #16
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Only relation is they are both ( usually) made from soy beans

Tempeh is made by boiling soy beans , removing the outer shell/ membranes around the bean, mixing in a starter culture and letting it heat ( I think at about 90F) for a day or two. A whole fungus forms around the beans holding them all together . You can see the whole and partial beans in the tempeh. I personally like it sliced up bout 1/4 inch, fried until golden brown, then drizzle some soy sauce on it. Im pretty sure tempeh is very popular in Indonesian dishes.

The dried tofu sticks/ sheets are made when a film forms on top of heated soy milk ( as it cools). It is then removed and dried .

the other dried tofu is basically extremely pressed tofu ( usually marinated with asian flavors). It is much firmer than tofu, but not ' dried or crispy). Tofu is made from curdling soy milk then pressing the solids into a block. In tofu, can not distinguish the beans, as it is made from soy milk.

All ( in general) are made from soy beans, although I have seen tempeh variations with other beans. I think I may have tried a chickpea tempeh

tempeh can be frozen for later use.
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Old 10-22-2021, 08:03 PM   #17
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The Indonesian dishes are the things I get the tempeh for, when at the Asian markets. I also saw the idea for making tempeh with other legumes, and thought about trying to make myself, but haven't gotten around to it.

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Old 10-22-2021, 08:44 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
The Indonesian dishes are the things I get the tempeh for, when at the Asian markets. I also saw the idea for making tempeh with other legumes, and thought about trying to make myself, but haven't gotten around to it.

Ive seen it made with other legumes, haven't given it a go yet. Only with soy beans. I was supposed to eat at an Indonesian restaurant a month ago while I was on my road trip. They had multiple tempeh dishes , but unfortunately ( with my luck) was closed the week I was in. the general area.
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Old 10-25-2021, 04:00 PM   #19
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Tempeh also freezes well. I made this batch earlier in the year and had it for lunch today. As mentioned above, sliced about 1/4 inch thick, fried until golden brown ( both sides) drizzled with soy sauce.

***You can see how Tempeh differs from the other dried tofu products, as you can see the actual soy beans in the finished product ( held together by white fibrous fungus) which forms during the fermentation process) , as the dried tofu , tofu and bean curd sheets ( and sticks) are made from soy milk.***
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Old 10-25-2021, 07:32 PM   #20
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Thanks for the advice and experience Larry. Pictures of the packaging and uncooked product I got from Kroger below. I made this for breakfast a week ago. No picture but treated it like a sausage patty. Slice to half the thickness and cooked on a nonstick skillet in a little olive oil. Got more black than browning. Might have been better cooked slower in more fat but was so dry and tasteless that if I just don't throw away the leftovers, the next try will be slowly simmered in 'bout any kind of sauce. It could be that this isn't the right brand or maybe this is somthin' that'll just never be my cup of tea.
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