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Old 10-17-2007, 02:27 AM   #1
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ISO Help w Conversions/Recipe

There may be a conversion chart around, but wondered if anyone could help/knows right-off-the-top of their head, the U.S. conversion/equivalent measurements? TIA

800 g can diced tomatoes
225 g self-rising flour
100 g parmesan, freshly grated
50 g cheddar, freshly grated
125 g cold unsalted butter, chopped
80 ml milk
22cm cake pan

And... what is Almond meal - can I use a substitute?

Almond meal, to sprinkle

This is the recipe I had in mind.

Upside-down Tomato Basil Pie

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Old 10-17-2007, 02:35 AM   #2
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Weight conversion for weight measurements - online weight converter - on-line metric conversions

here ya go.
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Old 10-17-2007, 02:50 AM   #3
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Thanks, Tatt, but asked if anyone could help me that knows off the top of their head. Charts confuse me... And, I had a question about the almond meal.
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Old 10-17-2007, 05:22 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
Thanks, Tatt, but asked if anyone could help me that knows off the top of their head. Charts confuse me... And, I had a question about the almond meal.
Don't get frustrated! Easy one - Almond meal is almonds ground into a flour consistency more or less, depending on how you want to use it.
Now, all those little g measurements are grams weight - Looks like the recipe chef weighs everything - fine. You do have a calculator and a kitchen scale? One ounce of weight (16 ozs to a pound) is equal to 28.38 grams. (A pound of 16 ounces is 454 grams.)

So divide each g weight by 28.38 and you will have ounces of weight! There are some cooking conversions that show approximate volumn amounts per weight - like how many ounces by weight of flour are there in one cup but I don't know where to lay hands on that right at the minute.

One ounce liquid equals 29.57 milileters so divide that ml number by 29.57 and you will have liquid ounces. I think it was 80 ml? Divided by 29.57 you get 2.7 liquid ounces.

The pan is 8.66" I'm trying to think of my cook book that has some conversions that are useful - later!

Hope that helped!
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Old 10-17-2007, 05:35 AM   #5
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Here are the 'off the top' conversions:

800 g can diced tomatoes 28 oz can
225 g self-rising flour 1/2 lb
100 g parmesan, freshly grated 1/4 lb
50 g cheddar, freshly grated 2 oz
125 g cold unsalted butter, chopped 1/4 lb
80 ml milk 2 oz
22cm cake pan 9"
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Old 10-17-2007, 05:45 AM   #6
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n/m

..........n/m
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Old 10-17-2007, 08:49 AM   #7
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Here’s an awesome and free program that converts nearly everything into nearly everything else. Select the tab for the desired conversion, in this case Mass. In the left window, select the starting unit, in this case, grams. In the right window select the final unit, in this cases ounces. Then type in a number for “Input” and the conversion is automatically shown as you type.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:43 AM   #8
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amy and Andy M ,weights to volumn conversions; flour - 1 pound all purpose = 4 cups sifted, hard cheese -1 pound = 4 cups grated, butter - 4 ounces = 1/2 cup. I've never had to use these but they come from a good source - Norma Jean and Carole Darden's "Spoonbread & Strawberry Wine" which I really like. Awesome family history and heritage family recipes. Their grandfather "Papa Darden" was a slave and they are successful professionals.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:56 AM   #9
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Now that I look at it, this is an odd little recipe. Why are they using units of mass (weight) for the ingredients? Why not volume? Is using mass common in recipes outside of the US? Interesting.
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:57 AM   #10
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You guys Rock! Andy you're the Man. Keltin, kewl site - will check it out. Dave - great input - Thank you. Tatt, huh? lol.

Another thing about the recipe - uses diced tomatoes - but sliced tomatoes are shown on top (when you flip it over). So... may tweek it and turn it into a cornbread pie (with cheddar), bake in a glass/pyrex, and see if sliced tomatoes will work on the bottom with the batter poured over. Whaddya think? Thanks again.

ETA: Now you know why I never balance my checkbook.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:02 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Now that I look at it, this is an odd little recipe. Why are they using units of mass (weight) for the ingredients? Why not volume? Is using mass common in recipes outside of the US? Interesting.
I thought so too, Keltin. Is it me, or does it look like freshly sliced tomatoes are on top? But - think I can run with it - changing things around. The almond whatever does sound interesting?
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:03 AM   #12
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Wink Very European I must say

Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
You guys Rock! Andy you're the Man. Keltin, kewl site - will check it out. Dave - great input - Thank you. Tatt, huh? lol.

Another thing about the recipe - uses diced tomatoes - but sliced tomatoes are shown on top (when you flip it over). So... may tweek it and turn it into a cornbread pie (with cheddar), bake in a glass/pyrex, and see if sliced tomatoes will work on the bottom with the batter poured over. Whaddya think? Thanks again.
Yes, oh so top chef European I do believe. Just remember 454 grams (I round to 500 grams) is a pound and a quart and a liter are close enough to be the same. Enjoy
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:06 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
I thought so too, Keltin. Is it me, or does it look like freshly sliced tomatoes are on top? But - think I can run with it - changing things around. The almond whatever does sound interesting?
I just checked, and the recipe also calls for 4 whole ripe tomatoes (they used Romas). And then it says:

Line baking paper at the bottom of a 22cm cake pan. Spray well. Lay sliced tomatoes in overlapping circles in the base so the bottom is completely covered. Spread drained tomatoes evenly over the top and sprinkle with chopped basil.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:11 AM   #14
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I just checked, and the recipe also calls for 4 whole ripe tomatoes (they used Romas). And then it says:

Line baking paper at the bottom of a 22cm cake pan. Spray well. Lay sliced tomatoes in overlapping circles in the base so the bottom is completely covered. Spread drained tomatoes evenly over the top and sprinkle with chopped basil.
Sounded a little odd, I thought. I would stick with sliced tomatoes - no? Think I can work around it.
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:19 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by *amy* View Post
Sounded a little odd, I thought. I would stick with sliced tomatoes - no? Think I can work around it.
From what I'm reading, the recipe says to slice up 4 whole tomotoes, cover the bottom of the dish with those slices, then pour the diced tomatoes on top of the slices, and then continue to build the bread. Right?
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Old 10-17-2007, 11:20 AM   #16
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Simply type the equivalent request into Google for an instant conversion

Example: open Google, then type 800 g in ounces into the search window and hit the SEARCH GOOGLE button.

Google will reply with 800 grams = 28.2191696 ounces Round that off to 28 ounces, which is the normal size of a can of diced tomatoes
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Old 10-17-2007, 10:01 PM   #17
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Hello

I am Anh from Food Lover's Journey. I think it would be a good idea if I clarify the recipe...

You need both fresh tomatoes AND diced canned tomatoes for this recipe.

Like Keltin said, line the bottom of the pan with fresh tomatoes, then add in the canned tomatoes. After that, spread the bread mixture...

As for the measurement, we use gram in Australia. but I also have a scale with US system so I just need to switch around. Other than that, google provides instant conversion, too.

Hope this helps!
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Old 10-18-2007, 03:58 AM   #18
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Originally Posted by white_poplar View Post
Hello

I am Anh from Food Lover's Journey. I think it would be a good idea if I clarify the recipe...

You need both fresh tomatoes AND diced canned tomatoes for this recipe.

Like Keltin said, line the bottom of the pan with fresh tomatoes, then add in the canned tomatoes. After that, spread the bread mixture...

As for the measurement, we use gram in Australia. but I also have a scale with US system so I just need to switch around. Other than that, google provides instant conversion, too.

Hope this helps!
Thank you Keltin & Caine.

Anh, what a coinicidence. Your recipe looks lovely. Thanks for jumping in and helping.
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Old 10-18-2007, 11:40 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Now that I look at it, this is an odd little recipe. Why are they using units of mass (weight) for the ingredients? Why not volume? Is using mass common in recipes outside of the US? Interesting.
I'm not sure if it's common to weigh ingredients in other countries, instead of using volume measurements (cup, tablespoon, liter, etc.). I do know that when you're baking, it's more accurate to weigh the ingredients instead of measuring out a cup or two of flour. Measuring by volume of dry ingredients is rather inaccurate, due to how different people pack the measuring cup.
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Old 10-18-2007, 11:46 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllenOK View Post
I'm not sure if it's common to weigh ingredients in other countries, instead of using volume measurements (cup, tablespoon, liter, etc.). I do know that when you're baking, it's more accurate to weigh the ingredients instead of measuring out a cup or two of flour. Measuring by volume of dry ingredients is rather inaccurate, due to how different people pack the measuring cup.

Excellent point!
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