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Old 06-25-2020, 06:47 PM   #1
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Need help with Pork butt in Crock-Pot

I am making pulled pork. I haven't found a recipe that I have been entirely happy with yet. My niece made pulled pork a few months ago that I thought was pretty good so I asked her how she did it. Part of her instructions were have it in the slow cooker on low for 4 hrs. That didn't seem right to me but I did it anyway. Note that when I've done it before I usually do it for 6 to 8 hrs on low or maybe 3 to 4 hrs on high (depending on how fast I need it).
At 3 hrs I checked and realized it was in no way going to be done. The fat on it had not even begun to melt off and the meat inside was far from done. So I turned it on high, then two hrs later I checked it and it's done temp wise but not done enough to be pulled apart.
Right now it is going on 3 hrs on high, in addition to the 3 hrs that it was on low earlier. If it isn't done in the next half hour I am going to have to eat something else but I don't want this to go to waste.
Would putting it on warm overnight work so that sometime tomorrow it would basically just fall apart? Would it be ok to leave it on "keep warm" overnight? I am not sure if I could add some water without it reacting to the water and splattering everywhere at this point.

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Old 06-25-2020, 06:56 PM   #2
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Need help with Pork but in Crock Pot

Dutch oven in the oven 2 hours @325. I like to cut mine into 2-3 inch size chunks before putting into Dutch oven. I like to cut my fat back off (if u have it). U can cut into pieces as well and put in for juiciness but for actual pulled pork I don’t use it. Get more sides to brown that way and more dry rub throughout. Make sure your liquid covers to the top of the meat. Flip top pieces around about 1 hour or so in so they r submerged also.

You will know when done when u take a piece and try to pull apart. Goes easy your good. Still rubbery and tough keep cooking. Doesn’t hurt to cook longer. That’s the basics. U can get fancy from there.
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Old 06-25-2020, 07:39 PM   #3
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Dutch oven in the oven 2 hours @325. I like to cut mine into 2-3 inch size chunks before putting into Dutch oven. I like to cut my fat back off (if u have it). U can cut into pieces as well and put in for juiciness but for actual pulled pork I don’t use it. Get more sides to brown that way and more dry rub throughout. Make sure your liquid covers to the top of the meat. Flip top pieces around about 1 hour or so in so they r submerged also.

You will know when done when u take a piece and try to pull apart. Goes easy your good. Still rubbery and tough keep cooking. Doesn’t hurt to cook longer. That’s the basics. U can get fancy from there.
That's an interesting way to cook it. but it didn't answer my question. I am asking about leaving it in the crock pot overnight on the keep warm setting which is lower than the low setting.
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Old 06-25-2020, 09:17 PM   #4
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Keep warm setting maintais a temp of about 145 degrees F. That will not bring the meat up to temp. Rather, cook on high until the internal temp reads 195 degrees F. As was stated, make sure the roast is covered, at least 2/3rds up with water. A quick way to get your pulled pork is to take what you have, put it in a pressure cooker, and cook under pressure for 30 minutes. It will be perfect.

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Old 06-25-2020, 10:05 PM   #5
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I'm not an expert, but I don't think it would be safe to leave it overnight on keep warm.
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Old 06-25-2020, 11:17 PM   #6
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Keep warm setting maintais a temp of about 145 degrees F. That will not bring the meat up to temp. Rather, cook on high until the internal temp reads 195 degrees F. As was stated, make sure the roast is covered, at least 2/3rds up with water. A quick way to get your pulled pork is to take what you have, put it in a pressure cooker, and cook under pressure for 30 minutes. It will be perfect.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind Of the North

I have an Instantpot Chief and honestly I prefer the Dutch oven. Texture is better. If I need it quicker though I will do it that way. It’s slightly off so not that I don’t like it but texture tends to come out better for me in Dutch oven. Maybe I just need to play with the times more or something.
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Old 06-25-2020, 11:18 PM   #7
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That's an interesting way to cook it. but it didn't answer my question. I am asking about leaving it in the crock pot overnight on the keep warm setting which is lower than the low setting.

Yea sorry was giving an alternative to save imo some headache. Follow Chief’s advice. Never found him to give bad advice. :)
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Old 06-25-2020, 11:34 PM   #8
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Keep warm setting maintais a temp of about 145 degrees F. That will not bring the meat up to temp. Rather, cook on high until the internal temp reads 195 degrees F. As was stated, make sure the roast is covered, at least 2/3rds up with water. A quick way to get your pulled pork is to take what you have, put it in a pressure cooker, and cook under pressure for 30 minutes. It will be perfect.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind Of the North
Thanks! I don't have a pressure cooker just yet. I should get one but I'd need to make room.

Thanks everyone for all the great responses! I turned it on high and let it cook for another hour or so. I then shredded what I could and had a couple of sandwiches. I drained the crock pot and cooked the rest a bit longer and then shred it all up and put it in the fridge for leftovers. I definitely enjoyed the taste on this much more than I have before.

For those that are interested I first rubbed it with Famous Dave's seasoning and used tinfoil to keep the pork but out of the fat juices. I didn't add any water either. I pulled some of the meat apart as best I could and poured some BBQ sauce over the meat and it cooked two more hours like that. All in all I had it cooking for about 8hrs total. It turned out really tasty!
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Old 06-26-2020, 09:16 AM   #9
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I always use a crock pot/ slow cooker for my pulled pork. I rub it with whatever rub I have on hand, add a bottle of liquid smoke, set the crock pot on low and let it go for 6 hours minimum. I've been known to start it cooking at bedtime and let it cook all night. Then in the morning shred it and have it ready for supper. Sounds like you were successful in finding a way to salvage it though.
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Old 06-26-2020, 11:13 PM   #10
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I always use a crock pot/ slow cooker for my pulled pork. I rub it with whatever rub I have on hand, add a bottle of liquid smoke, set the crock pot on low and let it go for 6 hours minimum. I've been known to start it cooking at bedtime and let it cook all night. Then in the morning shred it and have it ready for supper. Sounds like you were successful in finding a way to salvage it though.
I usually prefer my pulled pork soaked in BBQ sauce. In the eastern south that's simply called BBQ.

As far as rubs go, I have found a couple that work pretty good and some that just don't taste right on pulled pork. So far this last one using Famous Dave's rub has turned out the best.

I've never tried the liquid smoke but I may need to check it out.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:59 AM   #11
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Hi Madmaxneo (at first I thought that last part stood for "north east Ohio"), and welcome to DC. If you'd rather keep to using only dry ingredients with the rub, The Spice House sells different smoke flavor powders. I have a jar of hickory smoke I use regularly. You could always mix in some smoke powder with the Famous Dave's rub for even distribution.
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Old 06-27-2020, 09:16 AM   #12
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Quote:
I usually prefer my pulled pork soaked in BBQ sauce. In the eastern south that's simply called BBQ.
As far as rubs go, I have found a couple that work pretty good and some that just don't taste right on pulled pork. So far this last one using Famous Dave's rub has turned out the best.

I've never tried the liquid smoke but I may need to check it out.
Here in eastern Virginia and North Carolina, barbecue is smoked, shredded pork shoulder most definitely not drenched in barbecue sauce You must be thinking of Memphis Our barbecue sauce is a simple mixture of red wine vinegar and red pepper flakes - no tomato or ketchup, and people generally don't use a lot. The flavor is supposed to come from the meat and the smoke.

Btw, an entire bottle of liquid smoke seems like way too much to me. Before we got our smoker, I made it in the oven with just a few drops of liquid smoke. You do want to be able to taste the meat.

Also before we got our smoker, I made it in the slow cooker with smoked paprika for the smoke flavor. DH was shocked at the flavor - that it tasted just like real smoked pork but without the bark. I posted the recipe years ago.

https://www.discusscooking.com/forum...ork-81344.html
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Old 06-27-2020, 09:51 AM   #13
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I usually prefer my pulled pork soaked in BBQ sauce. In the eastern south that's simply called BBQ.

As far as rubs go, I have found a couple that work pretty good and some that just don't taste right on pulled pork. So far this last one using Famous Dave's rub has turned out the best.

I've never tried the liquid smoke but I may need to check it out.
You can always add the sauce after shredding the meat. We add sauce individually as each of us prefers a different sauce. I like more sweet BBQ sauce and my son goes for the hot stuff while hubby likes the mild stuff.
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Old 06-27-2020, 12:17 PM   #14
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When I make pulled pork , I usually do it in the slow ccoker. But my best bersion uses my Webber Kettle, and the snake method for the charcoal, two briquttes side by side around the rim of the charcoal grate, with chunks of dry maple, and apple for smoke. A drip pan, half filled with water goes under where the meat will sit. Light one end of the snake. When the first two briquttes are glowing, place the top grill in place. Put you prepared pork but over the drip pan and close the top vent half way. This will take 5 to 8 hours, depending on you roast. Brush with a seaomed mop (broth) once every hour. The internal temp of the meat should be 195 when almost done. Finally, place the meat in a dutch oven., and add the broth from the drip pan. Place in a 250 degree oven, covered and braise for 30 minutes more. Use thalf of the juice as a base for your sauce. Pull the pork and stir in the remaining juice.

I typically make 3 different sauces and place in seperate bowls. I don't sauce the meat. I make a honey-mustard sauce, a sauce of tomatoe,brown sugar, chili powder, onion, and garlic, and a sauce of rice wine vinager, sugar, and soy sauce. Each person gets to use whichever sauce they prefer. That's for when I want to impress, or just give my best to whoever it is that needs it. And don't forget fruit based sauces, such as apple. Peach, cherry, or pineapple. They really work well with pulled pork.

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Old 06-28-2020, 05:04 PM   #15
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When I make pulled pork , I usually do it in the slow ccoker. But my best bersion uses my Webber Kettle, and the snake method for the charcoal, two briquttes side by side around the rim of the charcoal grate, with chunks of dry maple, and apple for smoke. A drip pan, half filled with water goes under where the meat will sit. Light one end of the snake. When the first two briquttes are glowing, place the top grill in place. Put you prepared pork but over the drip pan and close the top vent half way. This will take 5 to 8 hours, depending on you roast. Brush with a seaomed mop (broth) once every hour. The internal temp of the meat should be 195 when almost done. Finally, place the meat in a dutch oven., and add the broth from the drip pan. Place in a 250 degree oven, covered and braise for 30 minutes more. Use thalf of the juice as a base for your sauce. Pull the pork and stir in the remaining juice.

I typically make 3 different sauces and place in seperate bowls. I don't sauce the meat. I make a honey-mustard sauce, a sauce of tomatoe,brown sugar, chili powder, onion, and garlic, and a sauce of rice wine vinager, sugar, and soy sauce. Each person gets to use whichever sauce they prefer. That's for when I want to impress, or just give my best to whoever it is that needs it. And don't forget fruit based sauces, such as apple. Peach, cherry, or pineapple. They really work well with pulled pork.

Seeeeya; Chief longwind of the North
Oh reading that is making me hungry, well it is just about dinner time. I have to check out that stuff soon!
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Old 06-28-2020, 08:58 PM   #16
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for any who are unfamiliar with rubs or sauces, this is an excerpt from my cookbook - You Can Be A Great Cook With Pork. Since I am the author, I give myself permission to use it. I only hope it is helpful.

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The flavor of pork lends itself wonderfully to both sweet and savory flavorings. Though, like most meats, pork benefits from the added juiciness derived from brines, and work famously with marinades as well. Alternately, there are nearly limitless varieties of sauces and rubs.
A rub is a mixture of ingredients that is blended together and literally massaged onto the meat, which is then refrigerated for a few hours to let the flavorings permeate the pork. It is left on during the cooking process. Rubs can be either savory, sweet, and can contain some heat from peppers. Use rubs when you want intense flavor.
There are savory sauces, but most are usually sweet. The meat is basted during the cooking process with the sauce. Thin sauces are used for large pieces that require long cooking times. Thicker sauces are used on small, quick cooking cuts and are applied during the last few minutes of cooking.
There are as many recipes for pork rubs and sauces as there are people who cook. For that reason, we will explore a few basic recipes. Use instructions will be given with later recipes.
*
Rubs:
As stated above, rubs are broken into two basic categories, savory, and sweet. Savory flavors include pungent herbs, spices, and flavorings such as oregano, sage, coriander, cilantro, paprika, black pepper, and salt . Sweet rubs will contain ingredients like molasses, brown sugar, white sugar, sweet basil, sweet peppers, etc. Both usually incorporate universal flavors such as onion, and garlic.
There are no hard-fast rules to determine when you will use the savory rubs versus their sweet cousins. Just remember to balance the meal.
The first few rubs are savory. Care must be taken to control the salt flavor. They work as well when you are barbecuing with smoky hardwoods as with an oven-baked crown roast.
*
Italian Herb Rub
This rub can be used with pasta, or anti-pasta, and makes pork an ideal companion for Brochette. It can be used with chops, roasts, ribs, and steaks. Be careful with this though. The strong, pungent flavors can easily overpower the delicate pork. The idea is to enhance and compliment the meat, not replace it. In other works, a little goes a long way.
Ingredients:
1 tsp. dried Oregano
1 tsp. dried Basil
1/4 tsp. Rosemary
1/4 tsp. Powdered Thyme
1/4 tsp. Rubbed Sage
2 tbs. Coarse Black Pepper
 tsp. Salt
1 dried Bay Leaf
 tsp. dried Fennel
Place all ingredients into a suitable airtight container and shake vigorously. Store in a cool-dry place.
You may want to pulverize this mixture in a blender. But it's not essential to do so.
*
Savory Rub
As its name implies, this rub will impart a savory flavor to the pork. So the pork should be served with sweet flavored vegetables or fruits to balance the plate. A classic example would be to serve savory pork ribs with applesauce and a European style salad. Enjoy.
Ingredients:
 tsp. Rubbed Sage
2 tbs. Coarse Black Pepper
 tsp. Powdered Thyme
1 tbs. Spanish Paprika
1 tsp. dried Parsley Flakes
1 tbs. Granulated Garlic Powder
1 tbs. Granulated Onion Powder
1 tsp. Salt
Place in an airtight container and shake vigorously. Store in cool-dry and dark place.
*
Mexican Rub
Ingredients:
OLE! This rub will allow pulled pork to be used in tacos, tamales, burritos, sopa, chili con carne, and with a host od other south American, and Southwestern recipes.
2 tbs. Spanish Paprika
 tsp. Granulated Garlic
1 tsp. Granulated Onion Powder
 tsp. Red Pepper (Cayenne Pepper)
1 tsp. Dried Parsley Flakes
3 fresh-chopped cilantro
1/4 tsp. Coriander
 tsp. Salt
Place in an airtight container and shake vigorously. Store in a cool-dry place.
*
Oriental Essentials Rub
Pork is used in so many oriental dishes. Its sweet flavor compliments the colorful stir-fries and tempura dishes. This rub will help bring out the flavor of pork.
Ingredients:
 tsp. Granulated Garlic Powder
1 tsp. Granulated Onion Powder
 tsp. MSG (optional)
1/8 tsp. Chinese 5-Spice Powder
2 tbs. Dried Celery Leaves or  tsp. Celery Seed
Combine in an airtight container, shake vigorously and store in a cool, dark place.
*
Deep South Nut Rub
Aw Nuts! I know, bad pun (heavy sigh). I just can't help myself. To make it up to you, I give you my version of Deep South Nut Rub. And I'm not talking about a good back massage with peanut oil Hmmm. I wonder how that would feel. But then I'd smell like peanut butter. Guess I'd better put that idea to rest. But feel free to massage this nutty rub into your pork. Nuts and pork go surprisingly well together. And for a treat, substitute your favorite nuts for the ones in this recipe. You can change the oil to sesame, or walnut oil, replace the peanuts with crushed filberts, or Brazil nuts, or even macadamia nuts. Be creative. Your family will thank you. But please, hold the nut puns to a minimum. I’m enough of a nut for this world.
Ingredients:
1/8 tsp. Sesame Oil
1/4 cup finely chopped Peanuts
1 tsp. Salt
1 tsp. Coarse-Grind Black Pepper
1 tbs. Paprika
*
Mushroom Rub
Fungus, how I love fungus. I serve it with my pork, with my beef, in soups, stews, and chowders, or just plain, fried in a little butter. Oh, wait. I'm getting carried away. Mushrooms come in such a variety of textures and flavors, from the powerful flavor of morels, to the delicate chanterelle. But any way you use ‘em, I like ‘em. This rub uses mushrooms to add a touch of elegance to the pork, transforming the humble pig to an elegant meat, suitable for your mother-in-law.
Ingredients:
2 tbs. Dry Mushroom Powder (or dry your mushrooms in a warm-not-hot oven and then put in blender)
 tbs. Granulated Garlic Powder

1 tsp. Granulated Onion Powder
 tsp. Salt
 tsp. Black Pepper
Place in an airtight container, shake vigorously, and store in a cool-dark place.

My Favorite Rub
Ingredients:
1 cup dark brown sugar
2 tbs granulated onion powder
2 tbs. Granulayed Garlic powder
2 tbs smokedpaprika
1 tbs. Salt
2 tsp. Cayenne pepper
3 tbs. Chili powder
Mix all ingredients in a bowl, use on ribs, pork roasts, in the oven, in the slow cooker, on the smoker, or enven on the barbecue. This run is even great mixed ion with pulled pork.
*
Sauces
Like rubs, sauces are used to add flavor and improve the meat quality. But unlike rubs, you can marinate and baste with the sauces over time to create a rich flavor that completely permeates the meat. Combine those flavors with that of the smoke and you have created a thing of beauty. Enjoy.
*
Smokey Barbecue Sauce
This sauce is classic. It's the basic idea used throughout the South and at all barbecue cook-offs. Just remember, the basic recipe is just that, a basic recipe. Every barbecuer worth his salt will have his or her own secret variant on this theme. You can add peppers, vinegar, herbs & spices, wines, whatever you want. These can be wet or dry rubs. The choice is totally yours.
A word of caution is in order here. Most barbecue sauces and rubs contain a fair amount of sugar. That means it will burn easily. So when you are using a barbecue sauce, don't add it until the last few minutes of cooking time.
If you water down the sauce, and cook slowly over a slow fire, you can marinate the meat with it before cooking, then baste with it every fifteen to twenty minutes. But any way you use it, it will make your pork taste great.
Ingredients:
 cup Dark-Brown Sugar
1/4 tsp. Mesquite or Hickory Liquid Smoke Flavoring
1 cup tomato Sauce
2 tbs. Worcestershire Sauce
1/4 tsp. Mustard Powder
 tsp. Granulated Onion Powder
1/4 tsp. Granulated Garlic Powder
1/4 tsp. Black Pepper
 green Bell Pepper, chopped
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Heat while stirring until the Peppers are soft. Pour the cooked contents into a blender and liquefy for 15 seconds. Pour into a suitable container and refrigerate.
If using as a marinade, and/or basting sauce, thin to the consistency of vegetable soup. Use as needed.
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Old 06-30-2020, 03:54 AM   #17
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Pork butt? How... juvenile! I hope it isn't too big to fit! :D
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