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Old 09-11-2021, 06:42 PM   #101
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Quote:
Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
I don´t know what recipe you used, but they do not look at all like scones, I´m afraid.

Firstly, they look sort of grey; and secondly, no self-respecting Brit would ever serve scones with sauce on top.

Scones are very similar to (US) biscuits - the difference is the use of buttermilk and less sugar.

Scones are basically flour, butter, milk, egg and baking powder. Here are the ones I made a few weeks ago:

Attachment 48763

If you´d like the recipe, I´m only too happy to post it.

Scones are usually served warm, with butter, jam (jelly) and cream. There are savoury scones, however - usually with cheese, but sometimes with bacon.
British scones are more like US biscuits, which are a drier and plainer version of US scones. I bake mine from scratch, use a "scone and cornbread" pan for baking, and end up with very tender, moist, delicious triangles of goodness. I don't have a close-up photo of my scones, but I can show you one of them cooling on the rack.

Now you all have me wanting to bake a batch. Hmm, maybe a pan of chocolate-orange ones...Click image for larger version

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Old 09-11-2021, 06:44 PM   #102
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This is the recipe I based my scones on.
And before you wonder: no, I have never cooked for the Queen
https://www.goodto.com/recipes/queen...-perfect-scone
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Old 09-11-2021, 06:52 PM   #103
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Cooking Goddess:
Interesting to see you cut your scones into triangles. I think the original scone recipe ( which came from Scotland) also used that format, and used no sugar, no eggs, no baking powder, and lard instead of butter. Perhaps that´s how "scones", rather than biscuits, arrived in the US - through Scottish immigrants? l
Who knows?
My bro, who was a chef at a British castle for 25 years, used to invent all sorts of stuff with scones: bacon and leek, blue cheese and walnuts, orange zest, raisins... they´re so easy to add things to.
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Old 09-11-2021, 06:59 PM   #104
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FWIW, kara, my first choice for a profile name was "Scone Queen" - someone else had beat me to it. But that's how often I was making them back when I joined.

The recipe in the link looks like it calls for a bit more butter and dairy than the "classic cream scone" recipe I have. Mine has 2 cups flour, 1/3 cup butter, and 1/2 cup heavy cream. I usually add more cream - and use half-and-half instead. I also never make "classic" scones, adding things to this recipe instead. We like dried cherries, or dried blueberries and almonds, or dried apricots and candied ginger (although I leave the ginger out for Himself's half of the batch). I'm not sure if I've ever made a plain scone since my first batch. Our absolute favorite, which is in my little scone book, uses orange juice for the liquid, adds orange zest, and includes mini chocolate chips. DEEvine!

PS - I don't cut them into triangles, I use a specific cast aluminum baking pan that has eight triangular baking wells.

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Old 09-11-2021, 07:12 PM   #105
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A picture of the Orange Yoghurt Scones...

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Old 09-11-2021, 07:39 PM   #106
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
FWIW, kara, my first choice for a profile name was "Scone Queen"
The recipe in the link looks like it calls for a bit more butter and dairy than the "classic cream scone" recipe I have. Mine has 2 cups flour, 1/3 cup butter, and 1/2 cup heavy cream. I usually add more cream - and use half-and-half instead.
OK - there´s the difference, evidently, between "British" and "US" scones - which doesn´t surprise me at all. A month or so ago, a chef friend asked me to investigate how to make the "perfect" scone . (Perfect, of course, doesn´t exist)
In general terms, a "British" scone has more flour, about the same amount of butter, more sugar, and less milk (or buttermilk). 60% flour, 13% butter,7% sugar, 20% milk. "British" scones usually have eggs in them; "US" scones do not. "British" scones never use cream; the cream goes on top, along with the jam/jelly. A really exciting British scone may use raisins or sultanas; "US" scone are far more creative - orange peel, spices, dried fruit, etc.
The bottom line? It´s what ever rocks your boat, and British cooking is, generally, pretty conservative . (Takes cover in the bomb shelter
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Old 09-11-2021, 09:05 PM   #107
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Hmmm ... I have a bit less than a pint of Heavy Cream that needs using ...
recipe someone for a "Cream Scone"?
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Old 09-19-2021, 01:46 PM   #108
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Originally Posted by Cooking Goddess View Post
I tried one package of scone mix, and made a couple from my "Simply Scones " cookbook. They all were dry to our tastes. Now I make them from the same cookbook, but I add more liquid than called for. Much better results.

I also think that my Nordic Ware cast aluminum scone pan helps. The outside of each scone is nicely crisp, but the inside is soft and moist. Perfect every time.
We had a friend who spent much of her childhood in England. I would add liquid to scones to make them less dry and she would bite and say, "These aren't REAL scones." I kid you not, my scones could have been as dry as a Wheatabix briquet and I would have heard "these aren't REAL scones."
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Old 09-19-2021, 05:31 PM   #109
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Arrow Never Have I Ever Made ...

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Zucchini Bread
I used this recipe, but I think the next time I'll swap out the granulated for dark brown sugar.

<edit: I forgot to add that two of the loaves went to friends>
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Old 09-19-2021, 06:30 PM   #110
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Ooooh! Never done that - only banana bread.
Maybe I could use your recipe to fool my son, whose idea of vegetables is French fries!!
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Old 09-19-2021, 06:33 PM   #111
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Originally Posted by Kathleen View Post
We had a friend who spent much of her childhood in England. I would add liquid to scones to make them less dry and she would bite and say, "These aren't REAL scones." I kid you not, my scones could have been as dry as a Wheatabix briquet and I would have heard "these aren't REAL scones."
I think she came from the wrong part of England
My mum ( and my sister) always made scones, every week. They were moist, full of flavour and never dry. They made sweet and savoury (Cheddar cheese) scones -always the same texture.
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Old 09-19-2021, 06:41 PM   #112
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Originally Posted by karadekoolaid View Post
Ooooh! Never done that - only banana bread.
Maybe I could use your recipe to fool my son, whose idea of vegetables is French fries!!
It's quite tasty kara. Nice and moist.
I used 4 cups of shredded Zucchini, that I did in the Food Processor, much easier!
Where we lived before this place, there was a bakeshop that made the BEST Zucchini Bread, but refused to even give out an ingredient list!
I know that there was either Dark Brown Sugar or Molasses in it.

Maybe I'll try again with that shop.
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Old 09-19-2021, 08:48 PM   #113
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Every year, our garden would produce a lot of zucchini, usually too much to use as a veggie, So, I grated it for zucchini bread. Any grated zucchini would be frozen for a later time.

For those that have never had it, zucchini adds little to no flavor to this quick-bread. What it does add is a tender, moist, delightful texture. In addition, the recipe can easily be altered to taste by adding other ingredients.

Here's the basic recipe I used.

Ingredients:
3 1/2 cups grated fresh zucchini
3/4 cup unsalted butter, melted, plus 2 tbs. for greasing the pans
3 cups all purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon baking powder
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 1/3 cup (270g) sugar
2 large eggs, beaten
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon salt (omit if using salted butter)

1 cup (100g) chopped pecans or walnuts, optional
1 cup (120g) dried cranberries or raisins, optional

Preheat oven to 350' F.

In a large mixing bowl, place butter, and sugar. Beat with hand, or stand mixer on low speed until well blended. Add the spices, vanilla extract, and eggs. Mix on low until smooth and creamy. Slowly add the flour with mixer on low speed, Mix just until well combined. Overmixing will create a tough crumb. Fold in chipped nuts, raisins, craisins, white chocolate chips, or diced apple.

Liberally rub butter all over the inside of 2 standard loaf pans. Dust with flour. Shake out extra flour. Pour batter into the pans. Tap the pan gently to remove any bubbles, and evenly distribute the batter.
Place in oven and bake for about 50 minutes, or until a knife inserted pulls out clean. Let cool for 2 hours, then turn out. Slice, and serve with butter, honey, or sweetened creamed cheese.

This can be cooked as mini loaves to be given to friends, and family. If wrapped tightly in cling wrap, and placed in freezer bags, it freezes well.

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