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Old 06-29-2007, 11:27 PM   #1
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Question Ribs not as good as restaurant?

Hi , I have tried this recipe from the internet and for some reason it doesn't really as good as I expected. The meat is tender but for some reason it just lacks something.

This is the Recipe I used:

I used this sauce called Char Siu Sauce to replace the Ketchup brown sugar sweet sauce.

First boil a cup of water, pour it into the bottom of the baking pan

Put the ribs on the baking pan, meat side face up (the water are under the ribs, they have no contact)

Cover the ribs with foil paper, preheat the oven to 300F, and bake the ribs for 2 hours.

Apply the sauce when its done baking, and put it back in the oven for another 5-15 min.

(at last I added black pepper)

1. The recipe askes to add water to the bottom of the baking pan, probably I add too much water, the meat turn out to be too "steam meat"

2. what is the difference between Maxi Broil and Econo Broil for baking ? If I want to get the crust (the outside) for the ribs, shall I use Maxi Broil or Econo Broil ?

3. How can I make bake the ribs fall off the bone while able to keep it juicy (I know adding water can keep it soft but it isn't as juicy as the restaurant ribs) ?

Thank you

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Old 06-30-2007, 12:40 AM   #2
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Hi itcomic - you also posted a question here that Caine took the time to answer and I don't know if you have gone back there yet. An acknowledgment to someone's answer lets us know you are serious with your questions and appreciate someone's answer.

If you read your instruction manual for your apparent convection oven you will find out what maxi broil and econo broil is for - one is a higher temp than the other maybe? Econo broil just the inner element comes on - maxi broiler the inner AND outer broiler element comes on - your manual will tell you.

Without knowing your recipe there really isn't much we can tell you. We need to know what method you have used to cook your ribs. Broiling would be to caramelize the outside after the ribs are fully cooked the best I can tell.

If the meat isn't seasoned in any way before cooking it will lack "something". Salt and pepper alone help with the flavor of anything.

Also, ribs and water should never be associated with each other. A low temperature for a long time is what makes ribs tender - "low and slow" is the term used.

If you truly want help with this recipe you need to let us know exactly how you cook them and what you use to season them.
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Old 06-30-2007, 05:42 AM   #3
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Try eliminating the water and loosly wrap the ribs in foil.
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Old 06-30-2007, 06:09 AM   #4
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Itcomic....I don't cook ribs in an oven but here are some ideas.

What your ribs lack is flavor. Find a good rib "rub" The Internet will provide hundreds of them. For your cooking method avoid those that contain any type of sugars. Allow the ribs to come to room temperature before going in a preheated oven set at 200*-225* Place your ribs on a rack uncovered, and sit a pan underneath to catch the drippings. (No water in the pan) Cook for 4-6 hours. After the first hour, gently baste the ribs every 30 minutes or so with a mixture of apple juice, vinegar, and oil with some of the "rub' thrown in. When the meat pulls back from the bone about 1/4 to 1/3 inch they are done. Lastly if you like, turn on your broiler and broil on high heat to brown them up for only a few minutes. If you want to "sauce" them. Turn your oven off! Take the ribs out, apply the sauce and return to the "off' oven for about 10 minutes. Remove from the oven and let them sit for 10 minutes. Slice and........

Enjoy!
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Old 06-30-2007, 10:48 AM   #5
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Try using a BAKE setting instead of BROIL. With a BROIL setting only the top element heats up, which is pretty much like grilling the ribs, only upside down.
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Old 07-01-2007, 08:36 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Caine
Try using a BAKE setting instead of BROIL. With a BROIL setting only the top element heats up, which is pretty much like grilling the ribs, only upside down.
Okay people, today is the day we read our instruction booklets. We're having a pop quiz tomorrow so pay attention.

I agree with Caine, use the bake setting - kick it up to about 400 for 10 minutes after you a baste your ribs for the last time. This will make them crispy.

(Hey Caine, I love your signature line. Sure makes you think doesn't it???)
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Old 07-01-2007, 05:33 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DramaQueen
Okay people, today is the day we read our instruction booklets. We're having a pop quiz tomorrow so pay attention.

I agree with Caine, use the bake setting - kick it up to about 400 for 10 minutes after you a baste your ribs for the last time. This will make them crispy.

(Hey Caine, I love your signature line. Sure makes you think doesn't it???)
My method for finishing ribs in the oven is to kick it up to 450F. I usually do this on the grill, but in the winter when the weather may prohibit grilling, I use a very hot oven for no more than about 5-10 minutes max. No complaints to this point from my guests....
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Old 07-02-2007, 10:15 AM   #8
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I have always used a smoker for low and slow cooking......until this weekend. I stopped by the corner market on the way home from work Friday to get a few missing ingredients, and, as always, I couldn’t keep myself from walking past the meat counter. Low and behold, they had an amazing sell going on for beef ribs. There was a large slab marked for $2.02. I simply couldn’t pass them up even though we were set to grill steaks that night.

Since the grill was the outdoor instrument of choice, I decided I’d try my hand at oven ribs. It felt like “cheating” since I have always used a smoker for low and slow cooking, but then again, I figured I needed to be open minded, broaden my horizons, experiment, blah, blah, blah.

I used my largest covered roaster (a turkey roaster) and placed a meat rack in the bottom of the pan. I then added about 3/4 of a cup of apple juice to the bottom. I wanted liquid in the bottom of the pan, not so much to steam the meat, but to keep the drippings from searing and sticking to the bottom of the pan (the ribs were raised on a rack). I seasoned the ribs with a rub, set the oven to 225, covered the roaster and put it in the oven. I set the timer for 3.5 hours and walked away.

When the 3.5 hours was nearly up, we had the grill going in preparation for the “real” meat of the evening, the steaks. I took out the ribs and was pleasantly surprised. The meat had pulled back gently on the bone (as it does on the smoker) and was fork tender (as it is on the smoker). I covered them in sauce and put them on the grill to set and caramelize the sauce. Next, the steaks were cooked.

When we were ready for dinner, my wife tried a rib before making her plate. She was floored. She actually passed on the steak and had a plate of ribs instead! Now, all she does is rave bout the ribs and has “commanded” that I do several more racks for the 4th. I have to admit, the ribs were extremely good. Very juicy and tender. The meat fell off the bone and was still very juicy. Granted, it lacked that deep smokey flavor I get from the smoker, but these were still great ribs, and the simplicity of it is amazing. I think that’s one reason my wife raved so much abut the ribs; I think she doubted how good they would be since I’ve been smoking for years and always avoided the oven. Now that she has seen how easy it is (I’m not up checking the temp, adding wood, adding coal, etc, every hour or so), I’m beginning to worry that she won’t let me smoke anymore!

So, to the original poster, as the others said, set the oven on bake. Wrap the ribs tightly in foil so that they are sealed. No need to add water when you wrap them tightly in foil. Put the foil pack in the oven on 225 for 3.5 to 4 hours. To get a crispy outside, either put them on the grill when they are done, or put them on a cookie sheet and set your oven to broil. The element of the broiler will act like the coals of a grill and will crisp your ribs.
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Old 07-02-2007, 11:32 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itcomic
Hi , I have tried this recipe from the internet and for some reason it doesn't really as good as I expected. The meat is tender but for some reason it just lacks something.
What do you think it is lacking? IMHO, ribs just aren't the same unless they have been cooked with smoke. An oven won't cut it.
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Old 07-02-2007, 11:41 AM   #10
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I've had good luck starting my ribs in the oven low and slow and covered, and finishing them on the grill for an hour. I have a weber kettle and with mesquite chips I get a good smoky flavor. [No, these are not the same as all day in a pit smoker, but I don't have that equipment nor will I likely get it.]
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Old 07-02-2007, 03:05 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by bowlingshirt
What do you think it is lacking? IMHO, ribs just aren't the same unless they have been cooked with smoke. An oven won't cut it.
You got that right for sure - and it's gotta be CHARCOAL - forget the gas this time and for the good stuff.
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Old 07-05-2007, 03:59 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin
I used my largest covered roaster (a turkey roaster) and placed a meat rack in the bottom of the pan. I then added about 3/4 of a cup of apple juice to the bottom. I wanted liquid in the bottom of the pan, not so much to steam the meat, but to keep the drippings from searing and sticking to the bottom of the pan (the ribs were raised on a rack). I seasoned the ribs with a rub, set the oven to 225, covered the roaster and put it in the oven. I set the timer for 3.5 hours and walked away.

When the 3.5 hours was nearly up, we had the grill going in preparation for the “real” meat of the evening, the steaks. I took out the ribs and was pleasantly surprised. The meat had pulled back gently on the bone (as it does on the smoker) and was fork tender (as it is on the smoker). I covered them in sauce and put them on the grill to set and caramelize the sauce.

So, to the original poster, as the others said, set the oven on bake. Wrap the ribs tightly in foil so that they are sealed. No need to add water when you wrap them tightly in foil. Put the foil pack in the oven on 225 for 3.5 to 4 hours. To get a crispy outside, either put them on the grill when they are done, or put them on a cookie sheet and set your oven to broil. The element of the broiler will act like the coals of a grill and will crisp your ribs.
Thank you so much! I'm pretty sure even I can make ribs with your directions. I especially appreciate you taking the time to explain what it will look like and what to do to get a crispy outside. I'm just learning to cook and this really helps because who doesn't like ribs? I can have this as a reliable, stand-by main dish that I KNOW everyone will love.

Terry
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Old 07-06-2007, 07:10 PM   #13
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Here is how I've been cooking spareribs in the oven for ages and they are...mmmm
First I cut several little slits in the meat and press some garlic slivers in there.
Then I rub the whole thing with salt, pepper and dried marjoram, really generously.
Then I put it (them) in a metal casserole thing and bake in a fairly slow oven, say 320.
Occasionally I baste with the juices in the pan and they come out just to die for!
No covering or changing the temp, just basting every now and than.
And yes, an oven WILL cut it!
Beef ribs?
Yes, smoke them!
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Old 07-06-2007, 08:07 PM   #14
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Boil the water before you put it under the ribs, do that on your stove top. Coat the ribs with the sauce, but be sure to keep coating every 20 or so minutes. cook them babies for a good hour or 2 on 300 degrees. coat again, bring oven temp up then turn the oven off and leave them sit for a while.

if you so choose you can remove them, sauce them again, and cook for a few more minutes to get them really saucy, its not really neccessary though as "Cha Shu" or whatever is pretty flavorful. Also for next time be sure to marinate them at least 8 hours preferably more.

Im really into making Char Shui Ribs right now, I had some the other day.
Its great if you have access to an outdoor grill to make alittle more sauce and toss them on the grill for a few minutes.
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Old 07-06-2007, 08:50 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin
I have always used a smoker for low and slow cooking......until this weekend. I stopped by the corner market on the way home from work Friday to get a few missing ingredients, and, as always, I couldn’t keep myself from walking past the meat counter. Low and behold, they had an amazing sell going on for beef ribs. There was a large slab marked for $2.02. I simply couldn’t pass them up even though we were set to grill steaks that night.

Since the grill was the outdoor instrument of choice, I decided I’d try my hand at oven ribs. It felt like “cheating” since I have always used a smoker for low and slow cooking, but then again, I figured I needed to be open minded, broaden my horizons, experiment, blah, blah, blah.

I used my largest covered roaster (a turkey roaster) and placed a meat rack in the bottom of the pan. I then added about 3/4 of a cup of apple juice to the bottom. I wanted liquid in the bottom of the pan, not so much to steam the meat, but to keep the drippings from searing and sticking to the bottom of the pan (the ribs were raised on a rack). I seasoned the ribs with a rub, set the oven to 225, covered the roaster and put it in the oven. I set the timer for 3.5 hours and walked away.

When the 3.5 hours was nearly up, we had the grill going in preparation for the “real” meat of the evening, the steaks. I took out the ribs and was pleasantly surprised. The meat had pulled back gently on the bone (as it does on the smoker) and was fork tender (as it is on the smoker). I covered them in sauce and put them on the grill to set and caramelize the sauce. Next, the steaks were cooked.

When we were ready for dinner, my wife tried a rib before making her plate. She was floored. She actually passed on the steak and had a plate of ribs instead! Now, all she does is rave bout the ribs and has “commanded” that I do several more racks for the 4th. I have to admit, the ribs were extremely good. Very juicy and tender. The meat fell off the bone and was still very juicy. Granted, it lacked that deep smokey flavor I get from the smoker, but these were still great ribs, and the simplicity of it is amazing. I think that’s one reason my wife raved so much abut the ribs; I think she doubted how good they would be since I’ve been smoking for years and always avoided the oven. Now that she has seen how easy it is (I’m not up checking the temp, adding wood, adding coal, etc, every hour or so), I’m beginning to worry that she won’t let me smoke anymore!

So, to the original poster, as the others said, set the oven on bake. Wrap the ribs tightly in foil so that they are sealed. No need to add water when you wrap them tightly in foil. Put the foil pack in the oven on 225 for 3.5 to 4 hours. To get a crispy outside, either put them on the grill when they are done, or put them on a cookie sheet and set your oven to broil. The element of the broiler will act like the coals of a grill and will crisp your ribs.
UPDATE: I made a couple of slabs of pork ribs tonight using your described method and wow, they were fabulous! My 2 teen boys who don't really care for ribs (or at least, MY ribs) polished off one entire slab. And my nearly 5 year old son, who got his first loose tooth today and was afraid to bite anything, proclaimed "I love this "soft" meat - you need to make this tomorrow too". It really came out as tender as you described! I used a simple sauce recipe I had found years ago and slathered it on during the last few minutes on the grill. Here it is but don't laugh if it sounds weird:
Mix 1 can of jellied cranberry sauce with about a cup (or more) of dark brown sugar. Heat on stove until bubbly and then slap it on the ribs. Anyway, thanks so much for your post because this is one of my first true successes in the kitchen and it felt great!
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Old 07-07-2007, 03:35 AM   #16
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I was just talking about Cha Shu style rib cooking above.

For regular baby back ribs, Ill marinate overnight, work a rub into them, and then cover them and cook them on low (200) for an hour and a half to two hours.

Then I drain all the liquid that cooks off (fat, excess marinade etc.). At this point they are pinkish greyish brownish , fairly cooked. I apply generous amounts of BBQ Sauce (homemade) or layer in sauces (hot, honey, ketchup, various bbqs) and add in minced garlic and brown sugar. A dash of soy if the mood is right. I cook them covered for another half hour, remove cover, flip ribs, and cook for another half hour to an hour, with the heat up a bit.

If they are super tender and cannot stay on the bone, im often tempted to eat right there. If i can hold off I toss em on the grill for a few glorious minutes.

Bon Appetit.
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Old 07-09-2007, 01:01 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fisher's Mom
UPDATE: I made a couple of slabs of pork ribs tonight using your described method and wow, they were fabulous! My 2 teen boys who don't really care for ribs (or at least, MY ribs) polished off one entire slab. And my nearly 5 year old son, who got his first loose tooth today and was afraid to bite anything, proclaimed "I love this "soft" meat - you need to make this tomorrow too". It really came out as tender as you described! I used a simple sauce recipe I had found years ago and slathered it on during the last few minutes on the grill. Here it is but don't laugh if it sounds weird:
Mix 1 can of jellied cranberry sauce with about a cup (or more) of dark brown sugar. Heat on stove until bubbly and then slap it on the ribs. Anyway, thanks so much for your post because this is one of my first true successes in the kitchen and it felt great!
That’s FANTASTIC!

I’m so glad this method worked out for you. Sounds like you made some outstanding ribs! I imagine you were justifiably pleased with how it turned out! I remember when I did my first slab of ribs and it was with extreme trepidation that I took them off the smoker and sliced into them for the first time.....and wow, they were great. It’s truly a wonderful experience to go from rather nervous to extremely pleased and confident with one slice of the knife (or pull from a fork!). I’m thrilled it turned out for you. You are now on your way to being a rib master!

You’re finishing sauce sounds very good. I’m going to try it out. Thanks for the recipe!
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