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Old 09-25-2020, 04:45 PM   #1
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Salsa Recipe not yet right.

I have a salsa recipe I am trying to perfect. The ingredients are:

3 Cups of tomatoes
1/4 Cup Green Pepper
1 Cup Onion
2 Tbsp Jalp Pepper
4 Cloves Garlic
2 Tbsp lime juice
2 Tbsp Cilantro
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp black pepper
1/2 tsp cumin

Each time I try to mix these ingredients it comes out very watery. First time I used normal tomatoes and largely hand chopped everything except the tomatoes which I put into food processor.

Second time I used grape tomatoes thinking it would be sweeter and less water content. It was still watery and I simmered it. Tasted more like chili afterwards, but the consistency was better.

And most recently went back to normal tomatoes boiled the vegetable ingredients and peeled tomatoes before processing. Depending much more on food processor. Tasted like salsa but more water again. I am aiming to make it similar to pace salsa with added flavor.

How can I best do this?

Also what is that double boiler thing with inner pot with holes to separate boiling water from ingredients so I don't need to chase everything with a spoon?

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Old 09-25-2020, 04:57 PM   #2
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Try cutting up the tomatoes then tossing them with the salt and putting them in a colander to drain for 30-45 minutes. Then make the salsa.
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Old 09-25-2020, 06:08 PM   #3
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tom me, salsa benefits from the use of peppers with a more pungent flavor, such as an Anaheim, or Japne. Using mixed peppers adds complexity, and balances the flavors. Otherwise, your salsa recipe looks good to me.

I prefer chunky salsa, but with all ingredients cooked until soft. Also, before putting all of the veggies in, any herbs/spices should be heated in oil, to release the oil soluble flavors. When they become fragrant, add the peppers, garlic, and onion. Sauté for five minutes while stirring. Add the remaining ingredients, and taste after simmering for ten minutes. Correct the seasonings to your taste.

Some additions could include Tabasco Sauce, Sriracha, a couple drops of Liquid Smoke, pineapple chunks, jalapeno peppers, chili powder. A company called Pedery's has all kinds of peppers that you can purchase online. They range from no heat, to the hottest peppers in the world. That's where I order my peppers from.

I hope you find the flavors that will make your salsa just right for you.

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Old 09-25-2020, 06:31 PM   #4
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maybe if you strained your tomatoes before using them, or cooking some water off them, letting them cool and then add them to your recipe..the only way you are going to get rid of water is to strain or evaporate,,,maybe the addition of some tomato paste or crushed tomatoes would help
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Old 09-25-2020, 06:39 PM   #5
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Maybe remove the seeds and "jelly" from the tomatoes before chopping them up.
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Old 09-25-2020, 08:51 PM   #6
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I enjoy the flavor of the tomato gel that surrounds the seeds. You could cook the tomato down before adding it to your salsa. I stand by my previous post for developing the flavor profile.

Simply blanch the tomatoes in boiling water to make the skin easy to remove. Them dice the tomato, ad add it, and the tomato caviar to a pot. Cook until it's thick, stirring frequently to avoid scorching. in another pot, follow the previous instructions. Season the tomato with s&p to taste. Add all ingredients to the thickened tomatoes. You should get the texture you desire, without the overwhelming tomato flavor that comes with tomato sauce, or paste.

Good salsa is a combination of flavors ad textures, with none of them being too predominant. The tomato flavor is like a seasoning. As i chili, it is not the main flavor component, but rather a flavor enhancer. In the same way, chili powder ca overwhelm the other flavors, and is used very sparingly in salsa.

I have a salsa recipe that might just suit your tastes. If you are interested, I can post it. I have modified this recipe in the past to make salsa at about the same heat level as store bought salsa (Pace).

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Old 09-25-2020, 09:33 PM   #7
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Here is how you make three different Mexican style salsas; red, green and decorative!

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Old 09-25-2020, 09:43 PM   #8
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And if you want to see them used (who wouldn't?) here's my Sunday Brunch Southwest breakfast chimichanga!

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Old 09-25-2020, 11:01 PM   #9
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Wow, a pepper website. My friend will love to hear this.
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Old 09-25-2020, 11:03 PM   #10
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So basically only use outer half of tomatoes and extract the cores?
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Old 09-25-2020, 11:09 PM   #11
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What ingredients should be hand diced and what should go through food processor? I assume Cilantro best be done by hand? Should tomatoes after cooking be mushed with a spoon or something or food processed??

And again. What is that water boiling pan with inner pan with holes so water keeps boil but all ingredients can be extracted at once?
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Old 09-26-2020, 12:01 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cooking4Fun View Post
What ingredients should be hand diced and what should go through food processor? I assume Cilantro best be done by hand? Should tomatoes after cooking be mushed with a spoon or something or food processed??

And again. What is that water boiling pan with inner pan with holes so water keeps boil but all ingredients can be extracted at once?
Sounds like something I have. I use it for making stock. I also used to use it for cooking pasta. It can also be used for steaming stuff like asparagus, which is too long for regular steamers.

Be careful when you pull out the bit with the holes. If you pull it out of the pot too fast, you will have fountains of liquid squirting out of the holes and onto your stove and everywhere.
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Old 09-26-2020, 12:38 PM   #13
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In the Southwest, salsa is considered a condiment made with fresh ingredients and is not cooked.

I use a food processor and make sure the tomatoes are put in first. This is very important for the salsa to end up with the ingredients chopped in a goodly manner.

I cut the core out of each tomato, squeeze the tomatoes into a colander and when all tomatoes are squeezed, give a final press to the top of the pile of tomatoes. This gets out a lot of the moisture. Put drained tomatoes in food processor, add onion, garlic, and the rest of your ingredients. I use almost the same ingredients as you. Here is a photo of my current batch in the frig.
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Old 09-26-2020, 01:16 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bethzaring View Post
In the Southwest, salsa is considered a condiment made with fresh ingredients and is not cooked.

I use a food processor and make sure the tomatoes are put in first. This is very important for the salsa to end up with the ingredients chopped in a goodly manner.

I cut the core out of each tomato, squeeze the tomatoes into a colander and when all tomatoes are squeezed, give a final press to the top of the pile of tomatoes. This gets out a lot of the moisture. Put drained tomatoes in food processor, add onion, garlic, and the rest of your ingredients. I use almost the same ingredients as you. Here is a photo of my current batch in the frig.

I do mine exactly the same way Beth. The only other thing I would suggest is to use Roma tomatoes because they have fewer seeds and gel.

I want fresh salsa, not cooked in any way. Herdez brand of salsa is a pretty good substitute when I'm too lazy to make my own. I never buy Pace because it's made in New York City, don't cha know.
Whoops...now I see you live in Buffalo.
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Old 09-26-2020, 01:51 PM   #15
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In Mexico, salsa is made a lot of different ways - ingredients can be raw, roasted, broiled or grilled, and can be chopped or puréed. I use Roma style tomatoes because they're more meaty. I don't discard the seeds and gel - there's a lot of flavor there.

I broil the tomatoes and onions on a sheet pan. Just core tomatoes, cut in half and broil skin-side up till the skins are blackened. The skins will come off easily with tongs; the tomatoes will pick up some roasty flavor and shed quite a bit of water. I pour this off and freeze it to make soup with later. I chop everything by hand because I like it to have even sized pieces, unless I'm going to purée it.
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Old 09-26-2020, 02:58 PM   #16
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if i remember correctly picante is uncooked. Salsa doesn't have to be cooked, but can be. It can be chunky, or smooth. It is always thick enough to dip something into, or to use as a condiment on top of things. It shouldn't be watery, but not pasty either.

Ingredients that I've seed is salsa include tomato, tomatillo, onion, garlic, sweet and pungent peppers, pepper powder, black pepper, coriander, cumin, chili powder, cilantro, celery, and i rare cases, pineapple, and i rare instances, small black beans.

You can make your salsa any way you want. It's like kimchee, or stew, everyone makes it a bit different.

Me, I use the hottest peppers on the planet. When I make it for my wife, there is no heat at all. Use the tomatoes you like the flavor of. Just cook the tomato down enough to remove most of the liquid before adding it to the other ingredients. Make it the way you like it. Most importantly, enjoy it when it's done.

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Old 09-26-2020, 02:58 PM   #17
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Someone mentioned above they don't cook salsa... neither do I (or pizza sauce). Moreover, lose the cumin (that is why it tastes like chili), and cut the garlic at least in half.

The predominant flavors for Mexican salsa are tomatoes, onions, cilantro, peppers, and lime juice. Some garlic is good, but I think your recipe calls for way too much.

If you're gonna do this in the food processor, do the tomatoes first (and then strain them). Adding salt and resting before straining will result in more liquid extraction.

Then process the aromatics with lime juice and mix into the tomato mixture. Season to taste, possibly with more salt and a dash of sugar or ketchup (depending on how tasteful your tomatoes are). Go slow here as it is easy to add too much.
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Old 09-26-2020, 03:33 PM   #18
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Wow, a pepper website. My friend will love to hear this.
You want a website devoted to peppers? Here you go!
https://www.chilipeppermadness.com/
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Old 09-28-2020, 08:35 AM   #19
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I squeeze out the juice with my hands in a bowl then strain it into another bowl incase i need more juice to my salsa. I have had great luck with the zesty salsa recipe from ball banning book. I use jalapenos in mine. Here is a link to ball's recipe.
https://www.freshpreserving.com/blog/zesty-salsa
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Old 09-28-2020, 01:11 PM   #20
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If you cook it, it is salsa cocida (Spanish for cooked sauce). If you use all fresh ingredients without any cooking, it's pico de gallo (rooster’s beak), salsa fresca (fresh sauce) or salsa cruda (raw sauce). Picante just means spicy, and has nothing to do with the vegetables being raw or cooked.
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