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Old 04-09-2012, 02:44 AM   #1
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Savory Banana Dishes?

I was wondering what is a savory dish that has bananas in it?

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Old 04-09-2012, 07:27 AM   #2
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Do relatives count? There are many savory dishes that use plantains.
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Old 04-09-2012, 02:26 PM   #3
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They taste great with some curries. I sometimes put an uncooked bananna on top of a curry, before serving.
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Old 04-09-2012, 02:27 PM   #4
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Peanut butter and banana sandwich?
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Old 04-09-2012, 06:23 PM   #5
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Some ideas here:
Taste Junction: All time nibble - Savory Banana Chips
Hot Banana Salsa Recipe - Allrecipes.com
Shrimp with Banana Curry and Steamed Coconut Rice Recipe : : Food Network
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by masteraznchefjr View Post
I was wondering what is a savory dish that has bananas in it?
Bananas are difficult to use in savory dishes because they fall apart with any more than minimal cooking.

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Originally Posted by CraigC View Post
Do relatives count? There are many savory dishes that use plantains.
And thus why plantains are featured in many dishes, because they are banana's distant but tough cousin, very capable of standing up to harsher cooking. Unfortunately plantains are starchy not sweet, although some of the starch turns to sugar as they ripen, which is why you let plantains sit until they look like spoiled bananas (blackened) before cooking them, to allow more of the starch to convert to sugar--making them sweeter.

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They taste great with some curries. I sometimes put an uncooked bananna on top of a curry, before serving.
That sounds good! I like chutney with curry too, and I think for similar reasons, adding a thick sweetness to the hotness of curries.
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:08 AM   #7
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I bet the sweet of a banana and the hot of a chili sauce would make a nice dipping sauce, sauce or marinade for shrimp or seafood.
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:26 AM   #8
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And thus why plantains are featured in many dishes, because they are banana's distant but tough cousin, very capable of standing up to harsher cooking. Unfortunately plantains are starchy not sweet, although some of the starch turns to sugar as they ripen, which is why you let plantains sit until they look like spoiled bananas (blackened) before cooking them, to allow more of the starch to convert to sugar--making them sweeter.
Really, we buy green plantains to use them as green plantains. When we want maduros, then we buy them black. Many cultures use green plantains in their cuisine. Why is it unfortunate that plantains are starchy?
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:39 PM   #9
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Really, we buy green plantains to use them as green plantains. When we want maduros, then we buy them black. Many cultures use green plantains in their cuisine. Why is it unfortunate that plantains are starchy?
Well mostly what I see in Los Angeles markets are not particularly ripened, so when I want to use some I generally let them sit for several days or a few weeks until they get dark and sweeter.
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Old 04-10-2012, 04:13 PM   #10
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Well mostly what I see in Los Angeles markets are not particularly ripened, so when I want to use some I generally let them sit for several days or a few weeks until they get dark and sweeter.
You're missing the point. Have you not had tostones? These are green plantains which are fried twice. Once to soften them some at which point they are mashed into a disc shape and fried again until crisp and cooked through. They get drained and salted, like fries, and served with a garlicy, mojo sauce. They can also be thinly sliced and fried until crisp, viola the plantain chip. How about mofongo? Its very popular in Puerto Rico I believe.
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Old 04-10-2012, 05:13 PM   #11
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Being that I HATE bananas, no thoughts. But, maybe treat bananas like plantains?
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Old 04-10-2012, 06:02 PM   #12
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You can use it to make Pakodas (Indian style chick pea flour fritters). I just recently made that for some company and they were gone in no time and the hint of bananas made the taste so pleasent and surprisingly unexpected.

2 cups of chick pea flour
2 tbsp of semolina
1 tsp of grated ginger
2 whole bananas mashed
chili powder (however much spicy you like it)
Corriander powder (3 tsps)
Cumin powder (3 tsps)
Handful of cilantro chopped
3 tbsp of plain yogurt
2 tsp of oil
salt to taste
2 tsp of baking powder
water to make a thick paste

Mix all the ingredients except oil and water first with a fork until it's all nicely incorporated. Add a tiny bit of water to bind the mixture. Keep adding water until you have a smooth yet thick paste (consistency of grout). Let the mixture rest for atleast an hour.

Heat oil in a pan and once hot, slowly add the pakoda's to the oil and let them fry until golden brown.

Serve with your choice of dipping sauce. My favorite is cilantro and mint chutney.

Enjoy!
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:14 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yakuta
You can use it to make Pakodas (Indian style chick pea flour fritters). I just recently made that for some company and they were gone in no time and the hint of bananas made the taste so pleasent and surprisingly unexpected.

2 cups of chick pea flour
2 tbsp of semolina
1 tsp of grated ginger
2 whole bananas mashed
chili powder (however much spicy you like it)
Corriander powder (3 tsps)
Cumin powder (3 tsps)
Handful of cilantro chopped
3 tbsp of plain yogurt
2 tsp of oil
salt to taste
2 tsp of baking powder
water to make a thick paste

Mix all the ingredients except oil and water first with a fork until it's all nicely incorporated. Add a tiny bit of water to bind the mixture. Keep adding water until you have a smooth yet thick paste (consistency of grout). Let the mixture rest for atleast an hour.

Heat oil in a pan and once hot, slowly add the pakoda's to the oil and let them fry until golden brown.

Serve with your choice of dipping sauce. My favorite is cilantro and mint chutney.

Enjoy!
These sound good! How do you add the batter to the oil? Do you form it into balls, or drop it by spoonfuls? Or is it one big cake?
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Old 04-11-2012, 01:00 PM   #14
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pakoras are like small fritters so you drop them either in the oil with a tbsspoon or I like to wash my hands clean and use them to pick up a little dough and drop them in the hot oil.
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