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Old 09-21-2020, 08:57 PM   #1
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Squash Blossoms

I've recently watched a video by a favorite youtuber of mine (I don't know if we're allowed to mention names or not, so I'll keep it under my hat for now) where she made her own tortillas using masa flour and made cheese and squash blossom quesadillas. They looked so amazingly good.

So I was wondering, do any of you eat squash blossoms? If so, what are they like? I know it's a little too late in the season for squash blossoms, since we're now going into Fall (yay!), but was wanting to know, for those of you who have eaten or eat them regularly, how you cook them and how they really taste.

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Old 09-21-2020, 09:08 PM   #2
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the only way I have had/ cooked with them, is stuffing them with cheese ( ive done brie and also ricotta ). Then sipping them in egg wash, flour and or bread crumbs and frying them up. I also sometimes chew on them while Im in the garden. They dont have much flavor but have a nice delicate texture.
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Old 09-21-2020, 09:28 PM   #3
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I've eaten them several times this season, and eventually, I just cleaned a few batches of them, as I'd get them, and chopped them, sautéed them, and froze them, for later use. They have sort of a pepper like flavor. My favorite way to use them is in Mexican dishes - quesadillas, like you mentioned, tacos, soups, sopas secas, as well as others.

This is actually a good time for harvesting them! Winter squash are usually pretty set, as far as what you will get - any squash that form after this probably won't mature. And there are always still a lot of male blossoms, which can be harvested, and often this will stimulate many of the smaller male blossoms that are just an inch or so long to quickly grow to full size! Here's the first large batch I got, and made a delicious taco filling with. I've gotten 3 batches since this, from 6 plants, just back on 9-4!
Squash blossoms, washed and spun dry, just over 12 ounces. 9-4 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

This simple taco filling just had three more ingredients from the garden, plus queso fresco.
Taco filling, with squash blossoms, onion, tomato, and green chiles. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
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Old 09-21-2020, 09:28 PM   #4
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the only way I have had/ cooked with them, is stuffing them with cheese ( ive done brie and also ricotta ). Then sipping them in egg wash, flour and or bread crumbs and frying them up. I also sometimes chew on them while Im in the garden. They dont have much flavor but have a nice delicate texture.
Yes, I've seen them fried as well. Not even stuffed with anything, just dipped in batter and fried. But yours stuff with cheese sound delicious.

Our local farmer's market sells a lot of zucchini and yellow squash during the summer and pumpkins in the fall and I often wonder why they don't also sell the blossoms. I realize the blossoms are needed for pollination, but they've got to have some that are tossed out because they fall off or are not needed, since removing some of the blossoms actually controls the productivity of the plants.
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Old 09-21-2020, 09:30 PM   #5
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I've eaten them several times this season, and eventually, I just cleaned a few batches of them, as I'd get them, and chopped them, sautéed them, and froze them, for later use. My favorite way to use them is in Mexican dishes - quesadillas, like you mentioned, tacos, soups, sopas secas, as well as others.

This is actually a good time for harvesting them! Winter squash are usually pretty set, as far as what you will get - any squash that form after this probably won't mature. And there are always still a lot of male blossoms, which can be harvested, and often this will stimulate many of the smaller male blossoms that are just an inch or so long to quickly grow to full size! Here's the first batch I got, and made a delicious taco filling with. I've gotten 3 batches since this, from 6 plants, just back on 9-4!
Squash blossoms, washed and spun dry, just over 12 ounces. 9-4 by pepperhead212, on Flickr

This simple taco filling just had three more ingredients from the garden, plus queso fresco.
Taco filling, with squash blossoms, onion, tomato, and green chiles. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Oh, super lovely!
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Old 09-22-2020, 05:41 AM   #6
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Yes, I've seen them fried as well. Not even stuffed with anything, just dipped in batter and fried. But yours stuff with cheese sound delicious.

Our local farmer's market sells a lot of zucchini and yellow squash during the summer and pumpkins in the fall and I often wonder why they don't also sell the blossoms. I realize the blossoms are needed for pollination, but they've got to have some that are tossed out because they fall off or are not needed, since removing some of the blossoms actually controls the productivity of the plants.
Handle them gently. Mom would pick them (be sure to shake out any bugs) then wash and trim stems into short "handles". She would hold them by the stems and dip them in egg wash then into flour lightly seasoned with salt and pepper and a good pinch of fresh grated Italian cheese (Romano & Parmesan). Gently fried in butter till golden brown, flipping once. They were so good.


I can't find them or green tomatoes anywhere.
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Old 09-22-2020, 06:36 AM   #7
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I agree Linda, I would have thought they could sell the extra male flowers seeing as they usually outnumber the females.

Next time you're in the market perhaps suggest that to them? I understand they would only be good for that day - maybe harvesting and selling time have too great a distance to make the effort worth while.
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Old 09-22-2020, 07:53 AM   #8
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I enjoy them simply cleaned, dried, and dipped in egg wash, floor, egg wash, and panko bread crumbs. Season simply with S&P. To me, they have a mild umami flavor, a little meaty. Eat with ketchu0, salsa, or even A1 steak Sauce. They are also a great appetizer, and hold fillings well. Mix together cream cheese, minced scallops, crab, or shrimp with a bit of sugar and lemon juice. Stuff the blossoms, dip and fry, or bake until golden. Yum.

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Old 09-22-2020, 10:08 AM   #9
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Handle them gently. Mom would pick them (be sure to shake out any bugs) then wash and trim stems into short "handles". She would hold them by the stems and dip them in egg wash then into flour lightly seasoned with salt and pepper and a good pinch of fresh grated Italian cheese (Romano & Parmesan). Gently fried in butter till golden brown, flipping once. They were so good.


I can't find them or green tomatoes anywhere.
My local farm market has plenty of of green tomatoes. Green, red, yellow, orange, etc. Have you tried both local markets and grocery stores? I'll occasionally see green tomatoes at Kroger as well.

Your mom's squash blossom's sound lovely

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I agree Linda, I would have thought they could sell the extra male flowers seeing as they usually outnumber the females.

Next time you're in the market perhaps suggest that to them? I understand they would only be good for that day - maybe harvesting and selling time have too great a distance to make the effort worth while.
I was thinking the same thing, mentioning it to them the next time I stop in. I'm sure they have a good reason for not selling the blossoms, but then maybe it's only because they've never thought of it. So asking them surely couldn't hurt.

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I enjoy them simply cleaned, dried, and dipped in egg wash, floor, egg wash, and panko bread crumbs. Season simply with S&P. To me, they have a mild umami flavor, a little meaty. Eat with ketchu0, salsa, or even A1 steak Sauce. They are also a great appetizer, and hold fillings well. Mix together cream cheese, minced scallops, crab, or shrimp with a bit of sugar and lemon juice. Stuff the blossoms, dip and fry, or bake until golden. Yum.

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Excellent ideas, thank you. Now I just need to try and find some.
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Old 09-22-2020, 11:14 AM   #10
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Flowers should be used the same day, ideally as soon as harvested. Even held overnight in the fridge in a ziploc, one time I was called away, and had to wait until the next day, a number of them were badly wilted - I just tore the fronts off, as cleaning, and used them, but this is not something that would sell, which is probably why you won't see them in markets. They really can't get them that quickly, and tossing unsold produce is not something they like to do! Those auto misting things they have might extend their life a little, but that's only once they are there - there's getting them to the market that's another problem. A farmer's stand would be your best chance to find them...or maybe one of those places that lets people pick their own pumpkins, will let you pick blossoms!
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Old 09-22-2020, 11:57 AM   #11
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not a single one of my tomatoes has ripened on the vine. They are huge but green. Brought some in and they are ripening in the window... just not on the vine. Tarnation - window ripened just don't have the same taste as vine ripe.

We've just had 2 frosts this last week... and it is only mid-Sept!

The world has gone crazy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:40 PM   #12
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Flowers should be used the same day, ideally as soon as harvested. Even held overnight in the fridge in a ziploc, one time I was called away, and had to wait until the next day, a number of them were badly wilted - I just tore the fronts off, as cleaning, and used them, but this is not something that would sell, which is probably why you won't see them in markets. They really can't get them that quickly, and tossing unsold produce is not something they like to do! Those auto misting things they have might extend their life a little, but that's only once they are there - there's getting them to the market that's another problem. A farmer's stand would be your best chance to find them...or maybe one of those places that lets people pick their own pumpkins, will let you pick blossoms!
Oh! Great idea. Our farmer's market, every year, lets peeps go out into the pumpkin patch, so I'm going to see if I can find some blossoms this year.

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not a single one of my tomatoes has ripened on the vine. They are huge but green. Brought some in and they are ripening in the window... just not on the vine. Tarnation - window ripened just don't have the same taste as vine ripe.

We've just had 2 frosts this last week... and it is only mid-Sept!

The world has gone crazy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I won't argue with that one
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Old 09-22-2020, 01:26 PM   #13
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You might suggest to produce vendors that they bri g potted squash plants, full of blossoms.
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Old 09-22-2020, 03:40 PM   #14
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You might suggest to produce vendors that they bri g potted squash plants, full of blossoms.
I don't know if anyone would take to such an idea, but it would be nice
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Old 09-22-2020, 04:41 PM   #15
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I harvested 45 squash blossoms today!
https://www.discusscooking.com/forum...ml#post1635232
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Old 09-22-2020, 05:00 PM   #16
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I harvested 45 squash blossoms today!
https://www.discusscooking.com/forum...ml#post1635232
Beautiful!

(I'll be by to steal some from ya, hahaha)
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Old 09-22-2020, 05:49 PM   #17
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You might suggest to produce vendors that they bri g potted squash plants, full of blossoms.
They actually have a variety of zucchini grown in Italy, mainly for the blossoms - they will produce zucchini, but if grown in a greenhouse or under cover, the flowers are the main harvest. Probably not done in this country, except maybe in or near a large city, to supply restaurants that serve these.
https://www.growitalian.com/zucchino...flower-146-57/
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Old 09-22-2020, 08:33 PM   #18
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I fried 6 of those, and chopped up all the rest, then cooked them down in 2 tb oil. They cook down about 2/3 of the volume.
The rest of the squash blossoms, chopped up and cooked down for about 4 minutes. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Exactly 8 oz of cooked squash blossoms, ready to freeze. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
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