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Old 09-14-2021, 07:01 PM   #1
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I agree with you. I would expect potato salad made with russets would break down rather hold their shape like waxier potatoes. I use reds or yukon golds for potato salad and russets for baked. You can mash just about any potato.
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Old 09-14-2021, 07:15 PM   #2
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Believe it or not, the russets hold together, if you let them cool overnight or at least a few hours in the fridge.

I think my favorite potato, for most things, is the White Rose Potato. They are hard to find in the PNW. The only store that seems to carry them is Safeway/Albertsons, and not all of them either. I blame it on the fact that they put them side by side with the Golds and the cashiers always ring them as Gold. When I've asked about it, they just say they are the same price. But how does Purchasing know how popular the Whites are if they are only ringing up Golds? Grrrr...so, then, the stop carrying them.
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Old 09-14-2021, 07:47 PM   #3
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Oh, be adventurous. Try different kinds of potatoes for different things. Most of them will do okay for most stuff. I used to try to get the right kinds of potatoes. Then, I started buying only organic potatoes. Generally speaking, there won't be much selection of organic potatoes in any one store, if at all. I was just glad to find nice, organic potatoes, so I got used to using whatever I happened to have. Sure, I can usually get red potatoes or another kind. The other kinds tend to be Yukon gold or white potatoes.
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Old 09-14-2021, 07:49 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GinnyPNW View Post
Believe it or not, the russets hold together, if you let them cool overnight or at least a few hours in the fridge.

I think my favorite potato, for most things, is the White Rose Potato. They are hard to find in the PNW. The only store that seems to carry them is Safeway/Albertsons, and not all of them either. I blame it on the fact that they put them side by side with the Golds and the cashiers always ring them as Gold. When I've asked about it, they just say they are the same price. But how does Purchasing know how popular the Whites are if they are only ringing up Golds? Grrrr...so, then, the stop carrying them.
Is that the pink fleshed potato? I have had some of the pink fleshed ones.
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Old 09-14-2021, 08:03 PM   #5
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Is that the pink fleshed potato? I have had some of the pink fleshed ones.
No, they are quite white inside. Hard to tell the difference from a Gold on the outside. But, they hold together better and I like the texture better than a Gold. Maybe that's just me...but I do get compliments and queries about the potatoes in my pot roast, and other things where I use the White Rose.
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Old 09-14-2021, 08:07 PM   #6
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I did an experiment this year with French fries. I grow several varieties of potatoes ( Red Norland, Yukon Gold, Russet and Kenebec. Ive read that Russets make the best fries due to the higher starch.

I dont have the proper storage facility to store potatoes long term, so I have find ways to stop them in other forms. I make pierogi, gnocchi and fries. All frozen and last for awhile.

Anyway, I decided to make fries out of all the varieties and do a taste test to see which I prefer.

The russet were the best. Not by taste, as they all tasted about the same, but just the texture. They seemed to crisp up a bit better with a creamier inside. Not a huge difference, but there was one.

For me the Red Norlands are the most universal, but I continue to grow multiple varieties due to season length (all differ slightly as to when the are ready). And I dont like keeping all my eggs in one basket.
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Old 09-14-2021, 08:37 PM   #7
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Good info, Larry! Thanks! And, I'm with you, lots of eggs, lots of baskets! ;-)
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Old 09-14-2021, 08:47 PM   #8
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You are all very fortunate. I get white potatoes, or yellow potatoes here. The white are very mushy when cooked; the yellow are waxier. Then there´s the Colombian potato, which is very small, yellow and extremely tasty as long as you don´t overcook it. Then it turns to mush.
Did you know there are over 4,000 varieties of potato in Perú? How do they get to choose, I wonder?
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Old 09-17-2021, 03:37 PM   #9
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You are all very fortunate. I get white potatoes, or yellow potatoes here. The white are very mushy when cooked; the yellow are waxier. Then there´s the Colombian potato, which is very small, yellow and extremely tasty as long as you don´t overcook it. Then it turns to mush.
Did you know there are over 4,000 varieties of potato in Perú? How do they get to choose, I wonder?

Aren't the varieties incredible from Peru. I've looked at this picture of different ones and was amazed.



We eat mostly russets because they stay low in cost, for most of the year running 20-35 cents/lb. Sometimes we treat ourselves to something else, more waxy, moister.
We grow kennebecs, and I love those but we don't grow enough for all year and we don't have the correct kind of storage facility for them. I made a kennebec mashed potatoes, with water, lemon juice, garlic and onion powder, vegetable bouillon powder, delicious.
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Old 09-18-2021, 01:45 AM   #10
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It's all about variety, the spice of life. I have used both starchy and waxy potatoes for potato salad, and they are both good. Just different.

The starchy potatoes soak up more of the "sauce." The waxy potatoes stay firmer -- have more bite.

I mostly use red potatoes for my potato salad, but if I want a more "creamy" potato salad, I use a starchy potato, like a russet. That makes a potato salad that leans a bit toward the mashed potato side.

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Old 09-18-2021, 11:34 AM   #11
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It's all about variety, the spice of life. I have used both starchy and waxy potatoes for potato salad, and they are both good. Just different.

The starchy potatoes soak up more of the "sauce." The waxy potatoes stay firmer -- have more bite.

I mostly use red potatoes for my potato salad, but if I want a more "creamy" potato salad, I use a starchy potato, like a russet. That makes a potato salad that leans a bit toward the mashed potato side.

CD
My experience is pretty similar to what you've described. I used to lean towards red potatoes, as I like their taste and appearance in the salad. But, since trying the russet, I like that style too. I think it is just nice to switch things up a bit.

Oooo...that reminds me! I haven't made Asparagus Parmesan Potato salad in a while...
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Old 09-19-2021, 01:32 PM   #12
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Aren't the varieties incredible from Peru. I've looked at this picture of different ones and was amazed.



We eat mostly russets because they stay low in cost, for most of the year running 20-35 cents/lb. Sometimes we treat ourselves to something else, more waxy, moister.
We grow kennebecs, and I love those but we don't grow enough for all year and we don't have the correct kind of storage facility for them. I made a kennebec mashed potatoes, with water, lemon juice, garlic and onion powder, vegetable bouillon powder, delicious.
I knew there were many kinds of potatoes but was still surprised how many different ones I saw in this picture. Of course, I now want to try them all.
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Old 09-19-2021, 01:40 PM   #13
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I knew there were many kinds of potatoes but was still surprised how many different ones I saw in this picture. Of course, I now want to try them all.

Me TOO!
We were kind of disappointed this year in the potatoes we harvested, so we decided we'd give potato growing a break next summer. A year off. It will make room for something else.

Then a friend writes to me and she offers me blue potatoes to grow! Well maybe in another year. I thought blue potatoes would be fun to grow, for the change.
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Old 09-19-2021, 03:45 PM   #14
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Me TOO!
We were kind of disappointed this year in the potatoes we harvested, so we decided we'd give potato growing a break next summer. A year off. It will make room for something else.

Then a friend writes to me and she offers me blue potatoes to grow! Well maybe in another year. I thought blue potatoes would be fun to grow, for the change.

Might I suggest growing peas and beans where the spuds were. It will fix nitrogen into the soil.

A trick for greater potato harvest is to plant the seed potatoes, about 3 foot apart. When they are about a foot high, place an old tire over the plant, so that the plant is in the circle center. Cover with soil until only 2 inches of the plant is showing. Let it grow a foot tal again, and repeat with a 2nd tire. Repeat this process until you have three, or four stacked tires. The potato plant will produce spuds along the entire potato root, giving you more potatoes per square foot of space. To harvest, simply remove the tires to let the soil fall out, and collect your spuds.

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Old 09-19-2021, 03:54 PM   #15
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Might I suggest growing peas and beans where the spuds were. It will fix nitrogen into the soil.

A trick for greater potato harvest is to plant the seed potatoes, about 3 foot apart. When they are about a foot high, place an old tire over the plant, so that the plant is in the circle center. Cover with soil until only 2 inches of the plant is showing. Let it grow a foot tal again, and repeat with a 2nd tire. Repeat this process until you have three, or four stacked tires. The potato plant will produce spuds along the entire potato root, giving you more potatoes per square foot of space. To harvest, simply remove the tires to let the soil fall out, and collect your spuds.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

That's so true about planting beans and peas and they fix nitrogen in the soil. Ideally, leave the roots of the plant IN the soil, don't pull them out. The roots and nodules on the roots left in the soil create air space once the bacteria rots (decomposes) it away, providing both beneficial bacteria, nitrogen, and air space which can capture water. Less compaction of soil leads to better harvests of whatever is planted after that.

We rotate our garlic yearly, and harvest in July, then plant beans (which we are just now harvesting in WI). We haven't decided what will go into the beans-space next year, but it won't be garlic or onions. Most likely tomatoes or peppers.
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