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Old 08-20-2012, 12:27 PM   #281
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Some useful tips certainly. I believe it can be very helpful ... For example, how to remove difficult stains ( coffee, red wine, ink, tomato sauce ) ... and how to´s ... Very clever addition in my viewpoint.

Kind regards.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:42 PM   #282
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Another one of my supposed OCD tendencies (according to the DH and my best friend--who is more OCD than I am--but her husband does all the cooking and grocery shopping) is that when I'm putting the groceries on the conveyer belt and when I'm bagging groceries, I put all the stuff that gets put away together in the same bag/box. I hate having s/one else bag/box my groceries. I don't want stuff put where it fits, I want it where it belongs when I get it home. I can haul the bag that has "bathroom stuff" to the bathroom, "basement stuff" to the basement, put the stuff that goes in the fridge away, the stuff that goes in the "ziplock, etc." drawer away. It drives the DH crazy at the store--but once home, it sure makes putting stuff away a quick process. It always made logical sense to me...pack like stuff with like stuff.
I do the same thing. I don't care if the bag with cans is heavy, I don't have to carry it that far. Also make it easier to sort into the thermal bag in the car in hot or cold weather.
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Old 08-20-2012, 12:52 PM   #283
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I do the same thing. I don't care if the bag with cans is heavy, I don't have to carry it that far. Also make it easier to sort into the thermal bag in the car in hot or cold weather.
I do the opposite lol. I like to use as few trips from at to house as possible, so I pack my paper bags like puzzles. If I can pack a cart full of groceries into 4 bags, I'm happy lol. I do group things together as much as possible as I go however. I agree it's much faster to put away that way.
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:43 PM   #284
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I do the opposite lol. I like to use as few trips from at to house as possible, so I pack my paper bags like puzzles. If I can pack a cart full of groceries into 4 bags, I'm happy lol. I do group things together as much as possible as I go however. I agree it's much faster to put away that way.
I've often asked if I could bring the "bag person" home too. No, I don't need help getting the stuff to the car--I can use a cart, but once home....where's the cart? Where's the bag person?
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Old 08-20-2012, 01:52 PM   #285
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I've often asked if I could bring the "bag person" home too. No, I don't need help getting the stuff to the car--I can use a cart, but once home....where's the cart? Where's the bag person?
I only have about 20 feet to go, easy. The steps are a pain, though. I can usually get everything in one trip and still have my keys out to unlock the door. If we do a Costco run, takes me a few more trips.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:02 PM   #286
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I've often asked if I could bring the "bag person" home too. No, I don't need help getting the stuff to the car--I can use a cart, but once home....where's the cart? Where's the bag person?
We have two carts available to us. A small one from Walgreen's and a really large one from the supermarket. Son #1 gets the big one, unloads the bags from the car, takes them upstairs right to the kitchen and puts all the groceries away. Then when he leaves, he takes the cart back downstiars to the holding room. What a nice son.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:13 PM   #287
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Today was my Save-A-Lot trip. I have to bring my own bags and bag everything afterwards myself. I remembered to bring the bags this time.

I had to make several adjustments as the cashier is putting things back in the cart after scanning them. Pizza does not go on it's side because it fits into the cart, it has to go flat or the toppings will end up off the top of the pizza. The 2 Haas avocadoes, almost ripe. don't get tossed in with everything else, they go in the little basket on top to keep them from getting bruised.

I'm home again without the bread getting too smushed.

I really like it at Walmat where they package things as they scan them. I load the conveyor the way I want things packed. Dry goods, boxed items together, cans together, cold things.. meats, cheeses together, eggs and bread last. I repackage the bags in the larger save-a-lot bags so they are easy to unload and put away.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:15 PM   #288
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I do the same thing. I don't care if the bag with cans is heavy, I don't have to carry it that far. Also make it easier to sort into the thermal bag in the car in hot or cold weather.
Oh--I'm normal--it is not OCD!
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:26 PM   #289
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No it's not OCD. I WANT all my frozen items in one bag, they help keep them frozen for the ride home. All of the squishy things are at the back end of the belt, that way they can be tucked into the tops of all the bags.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:40 PM   #290
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SO makes me crazy sometimes. She shops for groceries as part of her job as well as shopping with me for our own use.

She brings reusable bags and I have been instructed to load the conveyor belt in a certain order. It's fairly easy to remember - perishables go first followed by the rest. Still, she tells me every time we check out because apparently, I'm an idiot. That's OK though. We each have to tolerate each others' idiosyncrasies.

I feel bad for the baggers. They are either teens or seniors at our market. She hovers over the entire process directing what and how much goes into each bag and how it's positioned in the bag. I can only imagine what they are thinking. Of course, one guy wasn't thinking. When told to put the perishables into the cooler bag, he asked, "What are perishables?"

Then she hovers over me when I load the car. She grabs the bag with the eggs and bread in it and hands it to me last because obviously I would drop cases of bottled water, beer and iced tea on top of it.

When I shop alone for groceries I do none of this and all the groceries seem to make it home OK. Oh, well.

I'm certain she is like this because of having to do it for work. She doesn't want the groceries to be damaged because she'd have to go back to the store and doesn't have the time for that crap.
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Old 08-20-2012, 02:59 PM   #291
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Well, I don't buy bread or EGGS, but I categorize everything based on where it will go in the house, not what it is. I don't buy veggies, obviously, because of the garden, but fruit all goes in one bag--it all goes in the hanging basket (I hate fruit that has been kept in the fridge). Onions or garlic could go in that bag because those things also go in the hanging basket.

Meat in another. Anything frozen, another. Any cleaning products, another. In the car, they all sit side-by-side, nothing gets put on top of another bag.
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Old 08-21-2012, 06:00 AM   #292
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I just let the baggers do their job while I keep an eye on the register. Sometimes if the cashier doesn't push the item far enough down the shute, she picks it up again and rings it in twice. Experienced cashiers don't do that. They push them down to the bagger. It is always the new ones. And since I don't handle any of the bags, I let my son worry about all that. He does scatter the real heavy items throughout the items. All baggers love to put all the heavy stuff in one bag.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:10 AM   #293
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If you have ever sliced a bunch of cherry tomatoes, this trick might interest you. I saw this cool way to slice cherry tomatoes on a show today:

Life Made Easy: Cherry Tomato Slicing - Steven and Chris - CBC Player

If you can't view the segment, basically you take two lids (from yogurt, margarine, etc.) that are the same size. Place the one lid on a flat surface with the rimside up (upside down). Fill it with cherry tomatoes that are similar in size. Take the second lid, and place it right side up on top of the tomatoes. Gently hold the top lid in place, slice horizontally through the tomatoes. Wish I had known this trick during cherry tomato season. Next year.
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Old 10-09-2012, 05:27 AM   #294
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If you have ever sliced a bunch of cherry tomatoes, this trick might interest you. I saw this cool way to slice cherry tomatoes on a show today:

Life Made Easy: Cherry Tomato Slicing - Steven and Chris - CBC Player

If you can't view the segment, basically you take two lids (from yogurt, margarine, etc.) that are the same size. Place the one lid on a flat surface with the rimside up (upside down). Fill it with cherry tomatoes that are similar in size. Take the second lid, and place it right side up on top of the tomatoes. Gently hold the top lid in place, slice horizontally through the tomatoes. Wish I had known this trick during cherry tomato season. Next year.
That sound like it would be great for grapes, olives and other pesky items that tend to move around and take some time to process.

Good tip!
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:33 AM   #295
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That sound like it would be great for grapes, olives and other pesky items that tend to move around and take some time to process.

Good tip!
Definitely--olives I tend to slice using my egg slicer, but if you wanted to cut them in half, it would definitely help. And, I think most of us have extra lids floating around...
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Old 10-09-2012, 06:43 AM   #296
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I have to carry bags quite a distance ... when I have to park on the street, it is 22 steps up. From the alley/garage, it is less -- but, still, a dozen steps down on a gamey leg. So what I tend to do is make sure the perishables are in the same bags, and I bring them into the house and take care of them. The rest waits until I regain my wind or my husband goes out (usually both). Some things I simply leave in the garage until we need them. That's something I didn't used to do, just since I hurt my leg. I'm thinking maybe of buying a shelving unit and just not bringing some non-perishables into the kitchen until I need them.
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Old 10-09-2012, 08:01 AM   #297
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I have to carry bags quite a distance ... when I have to park on the street, it is 22 steps up. From the alley/garage, it is less -- but, still, a dozen steps down on a gamey leg. So what I tend to do is make sure the perishables are in the same bags, and I bring them into the house and take care of them. The rest waits until I regain my wind or my husband goes out (usually both). Some things I simply leave in the garage until we need them. That's something I didn't used to do, just since I hurt my leg. I'm thinking maybe of buying a shelving unit and just not bringing some non-perishables into the kitchen until I need them.
I had a co-worker years ago that used the trunk of her car as a pantry because she had a large number of steps to her apartment.

Any time someone stopped by she would press them into service to carry several items up the stairs!

Whatever works!
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Old 10-09-2012, 09:20 AM   #298
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Moderation: Removed quote from Spammer in which Aunt Bea gave very good advice below for a faulty oven, Thanks, Aunt Bea! PF


All your oven can do is get hot.

I would pick up an oven thermometer and check to see if the temperature is accurate, then just compensate by adjusting the temperature dial.

Does your recipe give good results to others that use it?
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Old 10-09-2012, 03:45 PM   #299
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Good bread comes from using the proper flour for kind of bread to be made, and the right ballance of sugar, salt, and flour for flavor, the correct amount of yeast, to leaven the dough, and the proper temperatures for raising the dough, and baking the bread. The amount of moisture in the oven is also important to create the type of crust you want. A more dry cooking environment gives a more delicate, tender crust. More moisture thickens the crust.

As long as the oven temperature is correct, the oven will not affect the bread quality. In fact, moving air, as in a convection oven, will cause the bread to bake much more quickly.

I believe that bread loft comes from to processes, how much gas is produced by the yeast, and then trapped by the gluten, and the expansion of the gas caused by heat, before the structure is set by that same heat. So, too cool an oven won't set the bread structure (raw dough), while too much heat will cause the crust to form too quickly, not allowing the bread to rise completely.

Too much oil will remove some of the elasticity of the bread, making it heavy, though moist and tasty. Too little oil makes the bread very dry in texture.

Water softens, and is absorbed into the flour starches, and into the protein (gluten), where it creates a rubbery mass that will trap and hold the CO2 created as the yeast organisms eat and digest sugars and starches from the dough. Also, if the yeast is strong enough (wild yeast), then it also gives off sufficient acid to give you sour dough.

Think about all of these things as you make your dough. Start with a proven recipe, and make sure your oven temperature is correct. Follow the technique instructions. Your bread will come out fine. From there, you can start experimenting with your bread. Some of those experiments will come out good, some great, and some will be disasters. But you will learn something from every batch you bake. And that's what it's all about.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 12-09-2012, 09:33 AM   #300
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To remove excess fat from soups, stews or sauces, drop in 3 or 4 ice cubes. The fat will congeal around them as they melt. You can then remove the fat and reheat if necessary to re-thicken.
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