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Old 03-14-2011, 02:43 PM   #161
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I find that hard to believe. Do you have anything to backup that claim?
The only thing I have to back it up is the word of my sister. She's a chemical engineer. If she didn't know how it worked, she would look it up.
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Old 03-14-2011, 03:00 PM   #162
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I am interested, too. I use a shower curtain (fabric) that I got at the Vermont Country Store (?) years ago. It is a no-mildew curtain. I wash it about every 2 weeks. I used to use a liner, but then realized I didn't have to do that. However, at our other house, we have a vinyl liner inside of the fabric liner....
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Old 03-14-2011, 05:32 PM   #163
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And the other day I noticed a new cleaning product on the supermarket shelf - one made especially for the new high-efficiency washers. Now that's not fair - plain old washers don't need a separate product to keep them clean.
tinlizzie, you don't need any of that cleaning product for your washer. Just dump a couple cups of vinegar into your washer and run it like that. Remember to leave the door open between loads so nothing icky starts smelling in there.
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Old 03-14-2011, 08:31 PM   #164
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I recently learned this from a TV show that had a cooking segment:

The easy way to julienne a carrot. First slice a fat carrot in as big of diagonal slices as you can.



Then slice the ovals of carrot.

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Old 04-02-2011, 09:37 AM   #165
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Quick Garlic!

I learned this tip from when I worked in a restaurant some time ago.

Instead of having to peel garlic everytime you use them, what I did was to peel lots of garlic at one time, use a food processor or blender on them, and mix canola oil into the whole thing, and blend once more.

canola oil doesn't have too much taste, and now you can simply use a teaspoon to "ladel" garlic for your use anytime. It's also more potent since it's well blendered, so a teaspoon of this might equal 3-4 cloves in terms of flavor it lends to your dishes. The garlic lasts for weeks this way even unrefrigerated. Just make sure to use an airtight cover!

hope this helps! let me know what you think of this
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Old 04-02-2011, 09:52 AM   #166
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...The garlic lasts for weeks this way even unrefrigerated. Just make sure to use an airtight cover!

hope this helps! let me know what you think of this

There is a danger here. The chopped garlic in oil is a breeding ground for Botulism, which can be fatal.

Yes, you can buy it in the stores but the manufacturers are able to process the food in a way you cannot. Garlic in oil should not be kept beyond about 10 days refrigerated.
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Old 04-02-2011, 09:59 AM   #167
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I learned this tip from when I worked in a restaurant some time ago.

Instead of having to peel garlic everytime you use them, what I did was to peel lots of garlic at one time, use a food processor or blender on them, and mix canola oil into the whole thing, and blend once more.

canola oil doesn't have too much taste, and now you can simply use a teaspoon to "ladel" garlic for your use anytime. It's also more potent since it's well blendered, so a teaspoon of this might equal 3-4 cloves in terms of flavor it lends to your dishes. The garlic lasts for weeks this way even unrefrigerated. Just make sure to use an airtight cover!

hope this helps! let me know what you think of this
Hi Karen. Welcome to DC.

Josie
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:04 AM   #168
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There is a danger here. The chopped garlic in oil is a breeding ground for Botulism, which can be fatal.

Yes, you can buy it in the stores but the manufacturers are able to process the food in a way you cannot. Garlic in oil should not be kept beyond about 10 days refrigerated.
We had a pail of garlic in oil in the walk in fridge once that became contaminated and the lid popped off. It was one of the most putrid smells I have every experienced. It had been sitting on the floor in the back behind some other pails for quite some time. One thing we always tell people is always use a clean spoon when taking garlic out of the oil and never double dip incase the spoon came in contact with any food while you were adding it.
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:08 AM   #169
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Andy's right. Too dangerous and not worth the risk of getting sick. Plus, I prefer using fresh garlic in my dishes.
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Old 04-02-2011, 10:49 AM   #170
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To make your own ready to eat salad, cut lettuce with a ceramic or plastic knife (or tear it up), then soak in ice cold water with about a half cup vinegar or lemon juice, for about 5 min. Store in tupperware. The water crisps up the lettuce, and the acidity of the lemon juice or vinegar keeps it from browning a little longer. I keep lettuce in the fridge at all times, and we have dinner salads before every meal to help control portion sizes at dinner. Makes me feel like I'm getting the restaurant experience at home, too.

Soaking celery in ice cold water in the fridge for a couple hours revives even the saddest, limpest celery. Limpness is caused by dehydration (in both lettuce and celery). The cells get deflated and can't hold their stiff structure, which is why the water fixes them right up :)
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Old 04-02-2011, 03:28 PM   #171
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There is a danger here. The chopped garlic in oil is a breeding ground for Botulism, which can be fatal.

Yes, you can buy it in the stores but the manufacturers are able to process the food in a way you cannot. Garlic in oil should not be kept beyond about 10 days refrigerated.
Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks for letting me know! I was just planning on doing that in the house, but I guess it's ok to do that for small quantities, like for the next three days or something.. Thanks for the advice Andy!
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Old 04-02-2011, 03:35 PM   #172
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Hi Karen. Welcome to DC.

Josie
Thanks Josie!!! Looking forward to learning a lot and contributing what I know here.
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Old 04-02-2011, 04:27 PM   #173
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Oh, I didn't know that. Thanks for letting me know! I was just planning on doing that in the house, but I guess it's ok to do that for small quantities, like for the next three days or something.. Thanks for the advice Andy!

Glad to help. We like to keep new members around for a while.
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Old 04-02-2011, 07:22 PM   #174
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tinlizzie, you don't need any of that cleaning product for your washer. Just dump a couple cups of vinegar into your washer and run it like that. Remember to leave the door open between loads so nothing icky starts smelling in there.
I'll bet someone with a spankin' new machine will be happy to see your tips. I still have a perfectly usable old washer (which smells fine) and was just kvetching. Think I'll complain some more. Just when I find a type of Tide that I like (well, that's what my Mom always used), they go and change the formula, size, color, etc. It takes me 15 minutes to decide on what to buy this time, reading through all the types. That's where I saw the newest stuff.

Thanks anyway for the helpful answer.
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Old 04-05-2011, 12:27 AM   #175
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I heard what sounded like a good idea on TV. If you don't want to have to open a bottle of wine for cooking, keep a bottle of dry vermouth and use that instead of wine. The vermouth can sit around open for a long time without going off.
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:47 AM   #176
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I heard what sounded like a good idea on TV. If you don't want to have to open a bottle of wine for cooking, keep a bottle of dry vermouth and use that instead of wine. The vermouth can sit around open for a long time without going off.

Yes, this is a good one. I think Julia said it some time ago.
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:50 AM   #177
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I heard what sounded like a good idea on TV. If you don't want to have to open a bottle of wine for cooking, keep a bottle of dry vermouth and use that instead of wine. The vermouth can sit around open for a long time without going off.
Another thing you can do with left over wine is to put it in ice cube trays, freeze the tray, pop the cubes in a zippie, and then you have wine for tossing in stocks, etc. I've done this with leftover small quantities of red or white wine and it has worked fine. Or, you can leave the cork off and it will eventually become like vinegar and you can use it as wine vinegar.

I've been known to toss a white wine cube in a glass of seltzer or in a wine cooler...
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Old 04-05-2011, 08:58 AM   #178
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Another thing you can do with left over wine is to put it in ice cube trays, freeze the tray, pop the cubes in a zippie, and then you have wine for tossing in stocks, etc. I've done this with leftover small quantities of red or white wine and it has worked fine. Or, you can leave the cork off and it will eventually become like vinegar and you can use it as wine vinegar.

I've been known to toss a white wine cube in a glass of seltzer or in a wine cooler...

Good idea. I also like your word, "zippie" it's a good word to use instead of baggie, or zip bag, or resealable bag.
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Old 04-05-2011, 09:08 AM   #179
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I don't know if s/one has mentioned freezing cheese...when cheese is on special (and if I have room in the freezer), I will buy bricks of it. I cut it into chunks that will fit in the feed tube of my foodprocessor, pop the chunks in the freezer for about 20-30 minutes, and then run it through the food processor using the grater blade. Sometimes I will add dried hot pepper flakes, herbs, jalapeno pepper to it as I grate it. Then I freeze it in one or two cup portions in zippies. By adding the pepper flakes or herbs, I have "flavored" grated cheese to use for tacos, taco salad, etc. without having to pay the higher prices for cheese with the flavors added. I try to use it up within 2-3 months. Which is about the cycle re: when cheese goes on special.

I was going to start a spreadsheet this year to track when things go on special, because it is usually about every 12-16 weeks, but I forgot. Has anyone done that--tracked when sugar, cheese, etc., goes on special in their area?
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Old 04-05-2011, 10:15 AM   #180
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Another thing you can do with left over wine is to put it in ice cube trays, freeze the tray, pop the cubes in a zippie, and then you have wine for tossing in stocks, etc. I've done this with leftover small quantities of red or white wine and it has worked fine. Or, you can leave the cork off and it will eventually become like vinegar and you can use it as wine vinegar.

I've been known to toss a white wine cube in a glass of seltzer or in a wine cooler...
I like the freezer and wine cooler ideas. I have used frozen chunks of red current juice in white wine for a nice cooler.

The problem with leaving it sit in an open bottle is that there is no guarantee it won't just go bad instead of turning into vinegar. At my house, an open wine bottle would probably collect cat hair
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