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Old 12-08-2020, 02:47 PM   #1
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US Navy cookbook circa 1920

Found this some time ago (a couple of years) and found it interesting, if you wish to feed several hundred at a time.

Note the steaks were 1 lb each.https://maritime.org/doc/pdf/cookbook1920.pdf
Everyone should eat military grade food at least once in their life..

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Old 12-08-2020, 02:58 PM   #2
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When my husband was in the Navy, the ship he was assigned to had a Tiger Cruise, where families can go aboard for a day cruise. I had a military lunch on the ship, but I don't remember what it was.
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Old 12-08-2020, 03:04 PM   #3
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Everyone should eat military grade food at least once in their life..
I ate military grade food for 762 days. But there was no stake in soviet military.
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Old 12-08-2020, 03:27 PM   #4
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I made 2 WestPac cruises, one on the Uss Ranger, and the second on the USS Kttyhawk. The food was generally pretty good, There was usually fresh milk, chocolate milk, and coffee to drink. We didn't drink the water from the fountains, or the kool aid (bug juice) as when aircraft launched from the deck, the lost a little JP5 (jet fuel) that went onto the water in front of the ship, where it could be picked up by the evaporators (not as much of a problem on the Kittyhawk). Most sailors didn't like JP5 mixed in with their bug juice.

When we had steel beach, we got 2 cans of beer, and steaks cooked to order on charcoal grills on the flight deck. We had 2 steel beach days on a 6 month cruise,

We ate a lot of Filipino foods, as we ha a lot of Filipino chefs on board, We also had eggs of any type, to order fresh, in the morning, usually with bacon, sausage, and corned beef hash. Occasionally, there were pancakes, or french toast.I have to say, that to feed 5000 men three-plus meals a day, the food was well above average, most of the time, Though, I had the toughest piece of meat I ever ate, a slice of corn beef on a reuben from the forward mess deck. You couldn't cut it with a sharp knife.

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Old 12-08-2020, 05:48 PM   #5
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I ate it for about 9 years, from Cuba to Vietnam and a lot of points in between. For some reason NAS Millington, near Memphis was the worst food, as they served rabbit WAY too often, but then too Marble Mtn mess hall served corned beef several times/week. We called it Red Death.
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Old 12-08-2020, 05:55 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I made 2 WestPac cruises, one on the Uss Ranger, and the second on the USS Kttyhawk. The food was generally pretty good, There was usually fresh milk, chocolate milk, and coffee to drink. We didn't drink the water from the fountains, or the kool aid (bug juice) as when aircraft launched from the deck, the lost a little JP5 (jet fuel) that went onto the water in front of the ship, where it could be picked up by the evaporators (not as much of a problem on the Kittyhawk). Most sailors didn't like JP5 mixed in with their bug juice.
You should have had a serious talk with your water king.
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Old 12-08-2020, 06:41 PM   #7
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Oh, my goodness! I could have used this cookbook when all my children were a home, 5 boys and 3 girls. Boys can eat like bears, especially in their teens.

I recall that one of my daughters decided to help me cook a meal and wanted to prepare potatoes for mashed. She asked me how many potatoes to peel and cut. I handed her a large saucepan and said, "Fill this." The look on her face was priceless.
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Old 12-08-2020, 08:25 PM   #8
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I've been on board BB-35, USS Texas. A pre WW2 battleship and this is what it's galley (kitchen)looks like. It was built earlier than the cookbook was written but was in active service during both world wars so it's crew ate meals made with some of those recipes. Yep, those are cookpots in the foreground. How would ya like to peel enough potatoes to fill one of those?

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Old 12-16-2020, 09:01 PM   #9
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Spent 5 1/2 years on active duty.

Breakfast was omelets, lunch was cheeseburgers dipped in Salt, dinner was cheeseburgers dipped in Salt.

It was awesome as a young dude

Dinner also might be pasta or meatloaf. Always made into a sandwich.

To this day, I still dip my burgers in salt and make all my food into a sandwich.

My wife thinks it is odd to make chili or chicken noodle soup into a sandwich.

.
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Old 12-17-2020, 04:45 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinylhanger View Post
Spent 5 1/2 years on active duty.

Breakfast was omelets, lunch was cheeseburgers dipped in Salt, dinner was cheeseburgers dipped in Salt.

It was awesome as a young dude

Dinner also might be pasta or meatloaf. Always made into a sandwich.

To this day, I still dip my burgers in salt and make all my food into a sandwich.

My wife thinks it is odd to make chili or chicken noodle soup into a sandwich.

.
My dad loves his salt and also had a stint in the military. Maybe that is where he developed it! I love meatloaf sandwiches and have seen pasta sandwiches. Never saw a soup or chili sandwich! Next time you have it, please take a picture so we can visualize! I imagine some may be really good!
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