"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > General Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 12-25-2017, 09:20 AM   #1
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: KY
Posts: 62
What can I put in my bread?

I am making another one of those Artisan no-knead bread in a Dutch oven. I am doing it every week and I am getting bored, don't get me wrong, it comes out perfect and delicious, but I am looking for something else.
What can I mix my dough with to make it more exciting, and when should I add it to my dough?

__________________

4food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2017, 05:04 PM   #2
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,184
Rosemary, thyme, roasted garlic, chunks of hard cheese, olives. Add one or more when you make the dough.
__________________

__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2017, 07:47 PM   #3
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: KY
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Rosemary, thyme, roasted garlic, chunks of hard cheese, olives. Add one or more when you make the dough.
So from what you are saying, adding any of those at the beginning should not affect the yeast for doing its job? Thanks
4food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2017, 07:55 PM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,184
I don't think so. The only thing that might is the olives, which are salty. If you're concerned about it, you could push them into the dough as you're shaping it just before baking.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2017, 11:30 PM   #5
Master Chef
 
Sir_Loin_of_Beef's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sandy Eggo
Posts: 8,971
Mix some raisins into the dough. After the second rise, roll the dough flat into a 15- x 9-inch rectangle. Combine 1 cup of sugar with 1 Tbs cinnamon. Brush surface with oil, and spread the cinnamon sugar evenly on the bread. Roll tightly from a short side and bake as usual. Makes great tuna salad sandwiches.
__________________
I Luv Sandy Eggo!
Sir_Loin_of_Beef is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 06:26 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
This is one of my favorites. The olive oil gives is a buttery mouth feel.

Olive Oil and Rosemary No Knead Bread - Just a Little Bit of Bacon

I follow the rise time (18 hour) and cooking temp (450) as with other breads.

If you want to make rye bread substitute 25% of the flour with rye flour and add 2 - 3 Tbsp. caraway seeds.
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 06:29 AM   #7
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Apr 2015
Location: New Hampshire Seacoast
Posts: 2,510
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I don't think so. The only thing that might is the olives, which are salty. If you're concerned about it, you could push them into the dough as you're shaping it just before baking.
I've never made it, but the directions I have for olive bread with olives in brine call for omitting any additional salt and adding the olives in the initial mix.
tenspeed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 06:41 AM   #8
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: KY
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by tenspeed View Post
This is one of my favorites. The olive oil gives is a buttery mouth feel.

Olive Oil and Rosemary No Knead Bread - Just a Little Bit of Bacon

I follow the rise time (18 hour) and cooking temp (450) as with other breads.

If you want to make rye bread substitute 25% of the flour with rye flour and add 2 - 3 Tbsp. caraway seeds.
Thanks for the recipe, it gives me all sorts of ideas
4food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 07:06 PM   #9
Executive Chef
 
Whiskadoodle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Twin Cities Mn
Posts: 3,856
Cranberries. Either fresh or dried, plus a savory herb.
Whiskadoodle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 07:42 PM   #10
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 3,671
Things that are brined and fermented, develop build up an acetic or lactic acid. So things like sauerkraut, olives, pickled peppers, fermented salsa, pickled garlic, will have a vinegar like brine.

From cheese making, vinegar is a good line of defense against growing molds or yeasts.
So for bread making, it would be best to avoid anything with vinegar or brine in the initial mixture because it kills the yeast (and any molds).

Instead, in yeast breads don't use the pickled peppers, olives, pickled garlic, or fermented salsa until it is done growing yeast, and use it instead for topping. (you can try drying them and then tossing them in oil to isolate them from the yeast growing in the dough)

That's just from the theoretical point of view. You might add olives in the beginning but just so the yeast doesn't all die off, make the bread with more yeast than normal. Yeast is a good taste, you might really like it that way. I know I do.
blissful is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2017, 08:00 PM   #11
Ogress Supreme
 
PrincessFiona60's Avatar
Site Administrator
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 38,389
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
I don't think so. The only thing that might is the olives, which are salty. If you're concerned about it, you could push them into the dough as you're shaping it just before baking.
Before the second rise, you can add anything you like to the dough, either layering it and rolling up or chopping it into the dough with a bench scraper. Shape the dough and let it rise, any salt or other rise inhibitor will have no effect.
__________________
“There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle.” - Albert Einstein
PrincessFiona60 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2017, 08:05 PM   #12
Master Chef
 
CharlieD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: USA,Minnesota
Posts: 9,475
What recipe are you using? Please share.
__________________
You are what you eat.
CharlieD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2017, 08:39 PM   #13
Master Chef
 
caseydog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
Location: Dallas
Posts: 5,630
Have you made beer bread, yet? I have no idea if it is no-knead. I don't know anything about making bread. My my ex was a bread-making pro. Her beer bread was good, and different.

I'll go away now.

CD
__________________
“People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing every day.” Winnie-the-Pooh
caseydog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2017, 02:12 AM   #14
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cooking Goddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Body in MA ~ Heart in OH
Posts: 13,605
casey, beer bread is so easy even you, a non-baker, could make it. Hardly any rules for this recipe.

BEER BREAD

Preheat oven to 375 degrees (350 dark or glass pan)
Lightly grease a 9x5 loaf pan

3 cups all purpose flour, sifted
1 Tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 to 4 Tablespoons sugar (white or brown) or honey, to taste
1 bottle beer (keep in mind the stronger the beer, the more flavor in the bread - if you want a neutral-tasting bread, use canned water like Busch natural light )
2 to 4 Tablespoons butter, melted

Combine dry ingredients. Add beer and stir just until blended - you will have some lumps. If you want a softer loaf of bread, blend your melted butter into the batter. If you want a crispy, crunchier top, pour melted butter over the bread once you've turned the batter into your pan.

Place pan in oven and bake for 40 to 50 minutes. Remove from oven, let cool for about 5 minutes before setting on a cooling rack. Wait at least 1/2 hour before cutting.

If you want to add cheese, you can add up to 1 cup shredded cheese after you've combined all of the other ingredients.


We generally like this the day it is made. After that, we've found that a light toasting (you don't HAVE to butter it...) improves the flavor and texture. YMMV.
__________________
“You shouldn’t wait to be senile before you become eccentric.”— Helene Truter

"Remember, all that matters in the end is getting the meal on the table." ~ Julia Child
Cooking Goddess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2017, 09:59 PM   #15
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: KY
Posts: 62
So many answers and so many choices and good advice. Thank you so much.
4food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2017, 10:04 PM   #16
Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Location: KY
Posts: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by CharlieD View Post
What recipe are you using? Please share.
I have been following those recipes.

https://youtu.be/KsDjJBgoJyc

https://youtu.be/I0t8ZAhb8lQ
4food is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2017, 11:09 PM   #17
Senior Cook
 
Kevin86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Ontario
Posts: 331
Quote:
Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post
Rosemary, thyme, roasted garlic, chunks of hard cheese, olives. Add one or more when you make the dough.
Add jalapeños to this mix for a great pop. Olives are optional lol
__________________
Kevin
Kevin86 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-29-2017, 12:50 AM   #18
Executive Chef
 
JustJoel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 3,667
Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
Things that are brined and fermented, develop build up an acetic or lactic acid. So things like sauerkraut, olives, pickled peppers, fermented salsa, pickled garlic, will have a vinegar like brine.

From cheese making, vinegar is a good line of defense against growing molds or yeasts.
So for bread making, it would be best to avoid anything with vinegar or brine in the initial mixture because it kills the yeast (and any molds).

Instead, in yeast breads don't use the pickled peppers, olives, pickled garlic, or fermented salsa until it is done growing yeast, and use it instead for topping. (you can try drying them and then tossing them in oil to isolate them from the yeast growing in the dough)

That's just from the theoretical point of view. You might add olives in the beginning but just so the yeast doesn't all die off, make the bread with more yeast than normal. Yeast is a good taste, you might really like it that way. I know I do.
I made a wonderful NY Jewish rye bread that had 1/4 cup of kosher dill pickle in it. The rise and crumb both benefitted. And the flavor was superb.
__________________

__________________
Dance like no one’s watching, sing like no one’s listening, but cook like EVERYONE is eating!
https://justjoel59.wordpress.com
JustJoel is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bread

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
×