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Old 10-02-2020, 04:18 PM   #81
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Before leaving for the afternoon yesterday,
I pot a Crock Pot on filled to the BRIM
with the makings of Chicken Broth.

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Oops!
I got a text from DH, "Your Pot is going crazy! It's bubbling over!"
He turned it to low and cleaned up what he could.

So this morning once everything was cooled,
I did a WWW search on how to clean the cooker
portion of the Crock Pot.
I figured it was a gonner. I thought that you weren't
suppose to get the inside where it got hot, wet, at all!

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VOILA!

I made a loose paste of Water and Baking Soda,
got out my 3M Non-Scratch Blue Pad,
and applied some elbow grease to that bugger!


Ya Learn Somethin' New Every Day!
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Old 10-02-2020, 04:56 PM   #82
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For cleaning, baking soda is da bomb.
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Old 10-03-2020, 06:55 PM   #83
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Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
for cleaning, baking soda is da bomb.
right?!
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Old 02-07-2021, 03:26 PM   #84
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I did not know this!

I was going through my dry pantry out in the finished garage,
checking dates on everything, ya know.
I realized that my dried beans/legumes are hoovering
near to the "best used buy" date on the packaging
So I did a search on the WWW and found an article on the
subject of storing beans.


This morning I took my stock and stashed them, still in
their original bags (I didn't know that you should not store dried beans in their original bags ), into the deep freeze.
I'll leave them there for a coupla days and then sort through them
for any "duds" and stones and then bring them back to room temp.

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I have oodles of Mason jars and new lids as well as rings,
so that is where they shall live from now on.

Ya learn somethin' new every day!!
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Old 02-07-2021, 11:57 PM   #85
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KGirl, I've known for a long time that legumes store for a long time, but I didn't know it could be this long! lol I keep a lot of the lentils and other legumes for extended times - ones that I get for deals in Indian markets, like 8 lb bags, which they have dirt cheap, often "buy one get one free"! (When this pandemic started way back, I was checking my inventory, and I had 42 lbs of legumes in my basement - not including that rack in my kitchen!). I have a shelf in my kitchen with over 60 jars of things, many of them the legumes, and I keep those large amounts in vacuum sealed bags in tubs in the basement, and when I need to, I refill the 1 to 3 quart jars by snipping the corner off one of those large, vacuum packed bags, fill the jar, then vacuum seal the bag again. I do the same with many whole grains, but not the cracked or ground ones, and a few others, that I've found out the hard way, go rancid, even vacuum sealed. They go in the freezer! With those, I refill smaller jars.

With some of those beans, like moth gram, and some others I rarely use, I vacuum seal the jars - sort of a pita, so I don't do it often. But I've never had any beans go bad on me!
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Old 02-08-2021, 12:32 PM   #86
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Pepper, I did not know that those vacuum sealer bags will still let in (and out) air, not necessarily the best option. I've been having a heck of a time finding Mason jars, but I do know that our local Ace Hardware store carries them, so I'm of to the store this morning!
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Old 02-08-2021, 01:10 PM   #87
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KGirl, I have had those vacuum sealed bags remain sealed for years. You can tell because they become rock hard! I check them occasionally, when in a tub, or a bag in the freezer (I keep a bunch of Foodsaver bags of one item in a 2 gal ziploc), and if any are "soft", I'll use that first, and if it is a large Foodsaver bag, I'll transfer it, and make a new one with the rest of the item. Usually, the surface got nicked, or something else that let air in, but it very seldom happens.

Back when I got my first Foodsaver, I tested the bags, to see if they leaked odors - peppers, onions, and garlic, among many other odors, permeate the thickest freezer bags of ziplocs, and other brands I had used. I just made a garlic paste, sealed it in a small FS bag, and let it sit several days. It fermented, expanded, and you can imagine how intense the smell had to be; yet, absolutely none of the odor came through the plastic! That convinced me!

I've also gotten rolls of different plastic from Cabela's, and an even cheaper one on ebay, and all have sealed well, with no aroma permeating. I'm not sure what the plastic is that they use, but it definitely works well, and, though it's not cheap, it is reusable - I reuse the dry goods bags, but not the meat bags.
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Old 10-30-2021, 03:27 PM   #88
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Ginny mentioned a new use for a household cleaning item
and that got me to remembering that not long ago
I had a Clorox Disinfecting Wipe in my hand, wiping
down something or another, and spied grease splatters
on the Microwave front control panel.
These wipes have a smooth side as well as textured,
the textured side made quick work of that!
In the past I was using Krud Kutter and a paper towel
to clean up the stove and micro-hood... this is much easier
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Old 10-30-2021, 04:23 PM   #89
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I worked for a battery company where we took Cyclone lead-acid batteries, with both anode, and cathode tabs on top, spot welded them together with shorting strip, in series, the soldered wires to the correct tabs for specific voltages. We packaged the batteries in plastic housings to allow outgassing, as metal containers would trap the gasses, creating an explosive mixture. The plastic molecule matrix has sufficient space to allow hydrogen to escape. Plastic is moisture proof, but semi-permeable to small molecular gasses.

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Old 10-30-2021, 09:40 PM   #90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
I worked for a battery company where we took Cyclone lead-acid batteries, with both anode, and cathode tabs on top, spot welded them together with shorting strip, in series, the soldered wires to the correct tabs for specific voltages. We packaged the batteries in plastic housings to allow outgassing, as metal containers would trap the gasses, creating an explosive mixture. The plastic molecule matrix has sufficient space to allow hydrogen to escape. Plastic is moisture proof, but semi-permeable to small molecular gasses.

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Let me see if I understand. Were you welding batteries together with shorting strips or the cathode tabs to the anode tabs on individual batteries? In any case, what does it accomplish?
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Old 10-31-2021, 06:45 AM   #91
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Interesting, Chief, thank you!

It actually seems to make sense that plastic is not completely impermeable, don't know why maybe something Dad said (chemical engineer).

I understand welding them together, have seen some in cases but not realized that maybe they were actually welded.

But would they not have to be replaced eventually? Or do you mean the strapping was just sort of a "hold it steady frame" so as not to jiggle the power flow connection.

At any rate, my first thought when I saw one was... damn that must be heavy! Again, can't remember how many but certainly more than 3 - maybe 5 or 6?
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Old 10-31-2021, 06:39 PM   #92
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We welded the anodes to cathodes, so that the batteries were in series. Battery voltage in series is additive, that is V1+V2+V3+V4 = VTOTAL. he batteries were primary batteries(rechargeable) lead acid solid electrolyte batteries, with each battery a 1.5 V rating. By soldering wires to specific tabs, cathode on on end, anode on specific cells), we could provide multiple voltages as the customer required. These were used for desktop computer battery back-ups.

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Old 11-01-2021, 06:18 AM   #93
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Chief - I was visualizing car batteries!
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Old 11-01-2021, 04:41 PM   #94
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Chief - I was visualizing car batteries!
When I worked with them, the battery was owned by Gates. It was bought out by Cyclone. They made D-cell, X-cell (slightly larger than d-cell), and BC-cell (similar in size to a beer can). They were, and still are some of the best lead-acid batteries available (high energy per unit size).


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