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Old 09-01-2017, 07:58 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Are you saying that I can bring the sealed meat back up to temp (say, 130*) and ready to sear in 5 minutes?
You can cook meats the night before, and bring them back to temp from the fridge, but it is probably more than 5 minutes. They will not cook any more bringing them back up to temperature.

BTW, Chef Steps has a pretty good time and temperature guide in PDF form at their website.

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Old 09-01-2017, 08:09 PM   #22
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Ok, I was curious about this.
I've been watching You Tube videos and there was this guy who did a 48 hr sous vide brisket at 130*, patted dry, then seared. I guess people routinely sous vide roasts for several hours without any ill effect.

So, If I can safely sous vide tri tip for 10 hours at 130* while I'm off to work I'd rather go this route. I will experiment.
The Chef Steps guide shows a beef roast, medium rare having an optimum time of 6 hours, with a window of up to 14 hours. For "tougher cuts," which would probably include tri-tip, they show an optimum time of 16 hours, with a window up to 24 hours for medium rare.

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Old 09-01-2017, 08:13 PM   #23
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Maybe the unit doesn't do that, but if the switch is manual you could plug the circulator into a lamp timer and set that to come on at the right time, thereby turning on the circulator. You could probably find a heavy duty or outdoor unit that accepts a 3-prong plug if that's what the unit has.
That wouldn't work on the Anova. You would still have to turn the unit on once it got power to it. The on/off switch is a touch pad, similar to a smart-phone screen.

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Old 09-02-2017, 08:28 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by roadfix View Post
Ok, I was curious about this.
I've been watching You Tube videos and there was this guy who did a 48 hr sous vide brisket at 130*, patted dry, then seared. I guess people routinely sous vide roasts for several hours without any ill effect.

So, If I can safely sous vide tri tip for 10 hours at 130* while I'm off to work I'd rather go this route. I will experiment.
Perfect way to cook tougher cuts. But this would give steaks a mushy texture.
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Old 09-02-2017, 09:38 AM   #25
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Originally Posted by caseydog View Post
That wouldn't work on the Anova. You would still have to turn the unit on once it got power to it. The on/off switch is a touch pad, similar to a smart-phone screen.
Actually, my Anova is WiFi connected and can be started remotely and completely controlled through a smart phone app. I assumed they were all that way, but now I see there is a model that doesn't have this feature.

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Perfect way to cook tougher cuts. But this would give steaks a mushy texture.
The Anova WiFi model has a feature that allows you to delay cooking by using an ice water bath to keep the food at a safe temperature for several hours. Once the temperature of the water reaches 40 degrees, the Anova sends a notification that you should start cooking. When you press cook, it will then heat the water to the desired temperature.

This feature also works with an Echo Dot...
https://anovaculinary.com/ice-bath-setup/

I have yet to try it, but it sounds like it would work great for steaks and tender cuts of meat that you didn't want to have cook for a real long time.
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Old 09-02-2017, 11:28 AM   #26
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The Anova WiFi model has a feature that allows you to delay cooking by using an ice water bath to keep the food at a safe temperature for several hours. Once the temperature of the water reaches 40 degrees, the Anova sends a notification that you should start cooking. When you press cook, it will then heat the water to the desired temperature.
Thats a nice feature.
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Old 09-02-2017, 11:56 AM   #27
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If I had the WiFi model with the features described above I most likely would have kept the unit. That is a very nice feature.
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