"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > General Cooking Information > Instant Pot, Crock-Pot & All-in-One Cooking
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 10-03-2007, 03:30 PM   #21
Chef Extraordinaire
 
pacanis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: NW PA
Posts: 18,751
Fill it up with what, the food, the liquid? I do neither and never had a problem, but the liquid does boil after a while (I have only done roasts btw). The thing is, it doesn't dry anything out or toughen it up..... at least in my case.
pacanis is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 03:53 PM   #22
Head Chef
 
elaine l's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,098
My experience is that my old crockpot does fine but the new one....whoa talk about over cooking. I made cocktail franks in a sweet and sour sauce for a potluck while camping. They actually turned black. My dh said "no way I am carrying that up to the dinner" I now know that it requires very little time to cook anything.
elaine l is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 04:13 PM   #23
Assistant Cook
 
EmsMommy7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: NJ
Posts: 19
Thanks!

Well gee... that makes sense to me. THe new ones are cooking hotter? I have my mom's old one... probably 40 years old at least.... and it never did this. THe cord was kinda frayed in one spot, crushed I guess.... and it was old, I figured I deserved a nice new crockpot, so I got one.

I made a beef/broccoli recipe, and the thing burned up in about 3/4 hours. That is when I returned that crockpot, actually. I'll bet if I make the same recipe again, the same thing will happen. I just thought "low 8 hours" or "low 10 hours" meant that it would take that long. It would be kinda nice to set it in the morning, go to work, come home, dinner's done... but I find that meals are done much earlier.

Yes, fill it up completely, to the lid. I thought maybe because I only filled it 3/4 of the way (say with the veggies, meat, little liquid, depending on the recipe) that that is why it didn't take as long to cook.

What if I just call the 800 number or something, talk to a rep. at Rival?

I am stumped! The food IS tasty... when it's not overcooked.
EmsMommy7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 04:24 PM   #24
Executive Chef
 
Hoot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: The edge of the Great Dismal Swamp
Posts: 3,306
Mrs Hoot pretty much echoes everyone here. New crock pots are fast.
We always make a potful..beef stew..pork and sauerkraut, etc.
I like the suggestion of an AC timer..I might have to look into that.
Good luck!
Hoot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 05:13 PM   #25
Master Chef
 
Michael in FtW's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Fort Worth, TX
Posts: 6,592
Well, we had a discussion on this a couple of years ago and we did some research, but I can't find that thread.

Now, while a Rival service rep might claim that ... The temps used to be 250 low, 300 high. Now they're at 300 low and 350 high. That's not the situation with the original old Rivals.

The old original Rival Crockpots (you plugged it in to turn it on and unplugged it to turn it off) never reached boiling temps - they simmered at around 170ºF. The first generation of Low/High models were the same - they only simmered ... about 172º for Low and 194º for High. Neither setting would ever reach a boiling point.

I don't know when exactly they started upping the temps - but I do know that one of those original pots did a great job of cooking a meal by simmering for 8 hours ...
__________________
"It ain't what you don't know that gets you in trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so." - Mark Twain
Michael in FtW is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 05:21 PM   #26
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
I was checking the Crock-Pot site to see if there were any answers, and all they say is this:

Question:
What temperatures do the "Low" and "High" settings reach?

Answer:
We can not specify temperature ranges for the "High" or "Low" settings. Our slow cookers differentiate "High" and "Low" by wattage. These wattages are set to ensure that a standard food load (as described in AHAM spec SC-1-1979) will reach a safe internal temperature within approximately four hours. The wattage required to do this is different for different models, and many variables are involved; (start temperature, food load, room temperature, etc.). Eventually slow cookers will reach a maximum temperature, however the temperature will be different for different environmental conditions and different food loads. Given enough time most food loads will reach the same maximum temperature on both "Low" and "High."
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 06:16 PM   #27
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Uncle Bob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Small Town Mississippi
Posts: 17,515
Quote:
Originally Posted by kelton
Given enough time most food loads will reach the same maximum temperature on both "Low" and "High."
This is what I have been told as well. At either setting it will reach maximum temp. On low it just takes longer to get there. What that temp. is, I have no clue. It is definitely hotter than the older models. I think the legal department requested this change. Ya think??
__________________
There is only one Quality worse than Hardness of Heart, and that is Softness of Head.

Kool-Aid...Think Before You Drink
Uncle Bob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 06:24 PM   #28
Assistant Cook
 
EmsMommy7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: NJ
Posts: 19
First of all... I LOVE this site! Everyone is so friendly and helpful! Thank you all for posting, researching, etc... I really appreciate it!

Okay, second of all, I am confused as heck.. I posted twice, in two different forums, and I replied to the one in the other thread, but now my reply is here too! I know they were "merged," but until I get used the format here, it is making me loopy! HA!

So FINALLY I have some answers! I am going to keep my new one, for when I need a second crockpot, entertain, am home to cook something, etc. And... I am going to look into getting the cord on my mom's old one replaced. It has Off/Low/High settings! I used to use that thing like crazy... beef stews, chicken dishes, and I HAVE carmelized a whole bunch of onions in the thing, omg awesome! THey cooked the entire day and by evening were so tasty.. I made a French Onion Soup! So here I am, going by my old practices with my mom's old crockpot, though I have this new one that's super hot, super fast, not meant to cook all day long.... They should have just left it alone.. .I mean it's called a SLOW cooker!!!

I can't thank you all enough! Looking forward to chatting some more on DC!

Nancy
EmsMommy7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2007, 06:26 PM   #29
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Bob View Post
This is what I have been told as well. At either setting it will reach maximum temp. On low it just takes longer to get there. What that temp. is, I have no clue. It is definitely hotter than the older models. I think the legal department requested this change. Ya think??
I definitely think the legal department was involved!! Water boils at 212, with added salt and other ingredients, a bit higher than that. In my crock-pot (a Rival, about 4 years old), the liquid is bubbling and boiling where it touches the side, so I know it’s outputting heat around 220+ on Low!
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 11:02 AM   #30
Cook
 
m00nwater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 81
This thread explains why I keep getting horrible roasts out of my slow cooker as well. I was starting to think it was me, or the cut of meat. I think I might go back to oven-roasting.
m00nwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 12:25 PM   #31
Head Chef
 
DramaQueen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
Posts: 1,347
Quote:
Originally Posted by m00nwater View Post
This thread explains why I keep getting horrible roasts out of my slow cooker as well. I was starting to think it was me, or the cut of meat. I think I might go back to oven-roasting.
You CANNOT roast meat in a crock pot. You can only stew, braise, or simmer. Roasting is a method of using dry heat. You have to add at least a cup of water to your crockpot in order for it to work properly. If you want to roast meat or poultry you have to use a dry oven method.
AGAIN, READ THE OWNER'S MANUAL.
__________________
Visit my blogsite: Chew On This
DramaQueen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 01:14 PM   #32
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Quote:
Originally Posted by DramaQueen View Post
You CANNOT roast meat in a crock pot. You can only stew, braise, or simmer. Roasting is a method of using dry heat. You have to add at least a cup of water to your crockpot in order for it to work properly. If you want to roast meat or poultry you have to use a dry oven method.
AGAIN, READ THE OWNER'S MANUAL.
Actually, that poster never said they were roasting in the crock-pot. They said they were getting horrible “roasts” from the crock-pot.....as in a cut of meat and not a cooking methodology. They are now considering changing the cooking methodology for the roast, a cut of meat, from crock-pot slow cooking to oven based roasting.
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 01:18 PM   #33
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
And actually, you can cook in the crock-pot without added liquid. Look at most of the meatloaf recipes that are out there. It's not as common, but it can be done.
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 01:53 PM   #34
Cook
 
m00nwater's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Oshawa, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by keltin View Post
Actually, that poster never said they were roasting in the crock-pot. They said they were getting horrible “roasts” from the crock-pot.....as in a cut of meat and not a cooking methodology. They are now considering changing the cooking methodology for the roast, a cut of meat, from crock-pot slow cooking to oven based roasting.
Thanks keltin. And ya, I use plenty of liquids, I know you can't "roast" in a slow cooker. How else would I get my gravy?
m00nwater is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 03:30 PM   #35
Executive Chef
 
Michelemarie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Suburb of Chicago, IL
Posts: 2,614
Send a message via Yahoo to Michelemarie
I use my crock pot alot - trying alot of new and different recipes and cooking the same old ones too. I have made a roast successfully - not a beef roast but a pork roast. I added a cup of chicken broth with 1/2 cup cranberry juice with a cup of dried cranberries. The two lb. roast cooked in 3 hours - sooner than I thought. I turned the crock pot off and it sat for 1-1/2 hours. I made sliced it with the electric knife and it was very juicy. I made a gravy by added a bit more cranberry juice mixed with cornstarch on the stove.

I have also cooked a turkey breast in the crock - no liquid - and it is fantastic! I have also made a whole chicken - again, no liquid - again fantastic - with lots of juice when it is done (plenty to make a gravy with).

PM me if you would like the recipes.
__________________
Michele Marie
Michelemarie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-04-2007, 04:37 PM   #36
Assistant Cook
 
EmsMommy7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: NJ
Posts: 19
I have also put a whole chicken in the crockpot (the perdue oven stuffer roaster,) and I watch for when the little thing pops up. It usually takes less time than I imagine. I have put onions, carrots and cerely chunks in the bottom, than sat the roaster on top. Yum.. comes out so tender, and I usually make chicken salad from that. I'm doing this tomorrow, as a matter of fact! (I'll be sure to NOT set it early in the morning.. maybe come home and set it around noon for it to be done by 4.) In the mean time... my hubby said he will look into replacing the cord on my old crockpot. Yay!
__________________
Nancy
EmsMommy7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2007, 03:48 PM   #37
Assistant Cook
 
BarbieDawl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 13
Girl, I will tell you what, my bf and I are both pretty busy during the day and I have school on Tues and Thurs and don't get home in time to start dinner before the old man gets home. (He is stove illiterate :)) So right before I leave around ten I cut a whole onion in large slices and put them in the bottom of the crock pot. I then fill the crock pot with salsa or bbq sauce and slice up a rack of ribs, into about four ribs per portion. If you have a bigger crock pot to fit bigger rib portions, I recommend it. But I let them cook on low for 6 hours and then serve them right out of the bowl. They are tender and have a wonderful taste.
BarbieDawl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2007, 06:40 PM   #38
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 16,226
Reading through this thread, I feel so badly for all the folks who are owners of the newer crock-pots. I still have my original Rival one I bought in the early '70s and it's still cooking like a champ. All - yes I have bunches more in many different shapes and sizes (all Rival) - the others are older ones I've purchased at yard sales or thrift stores for almost pennies. I wouldn't have the new ones if someone gave one to me. I wish everyone well who is struggling with their new crock-pots. I wish there is a good solution to your dilemma.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2007, 07:27 PM   #39
Head Chef
 
keltin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Down South in Alabama
Posts: 2,285
Send a message via AIM to keltin
Actually, it just occurred to me that there IS a way to convert the new slow cookers back to the days of old. Rival has stated that the cooking temperatures are set by the Wattage being used by the heating element. Wattage is a measure of power:

P = I * V

P = Power
I = Current
V = Voltage

I is further expressed as V / R

V = Voltage
R = Resistance

So, P = (V^2) / R

That’s V squared divided by R.

This means that the Resistance of the unit is preset and tuned at the factory, and it is set for a 120 volt AC input. Obviously, if the voltage is greater than 120, the power (wattage) goes up and it runs hotter. Conversely, if the voltage goes down, then the wattage too goes down, and the unit runs cooler. THAT is the interesting part!!!

Before moving on, it should be mentioned that this is inversely true of resistance. If the resistance goes down, wattage goes up, and vice versa. Obviously there is not much we can easily do about the resistance of the unit as it is preset in the factory.

However, you can easily change the input voltage with a simple device known as a table-top dimmer.

By adjusting the dimmer to a lower setting (lower voltage) you are decreasing the voltage available to the unit thus decreasing the total wattage thereby decreasing the total cooking temp.

If you have a VOM (Voltage Ohm Meter) then measure the resistance across the AC plug of the crock-pot. With the unit turned off, it will measure infinite (open) resistance. On low you get a reading, and on high another reading. But don't plug the unit in for this! Simply measure across the plug at each of the switch settings! This measurement shows you what the AC voltage is confronted with when it enters the unit.

For mine, it measures:

Low = 71 ohms
High = 61 ohms

In knowing that the input voltage is 120VAC (that’s nominal; realistically it is anywhere between 110 and 120), we use the formula of V / R to find I (current)

Low = 120 / 71 = 1.69 Amps
High = 120 / 61 = 1.96 Amps

The power formula then gives us: P = V * I

Low = 120 * 1.69 = 202 watts
High = 120 * 1.96 = 236 watts

Thus proving that Low and High cook at different temperatures and speeds.

Now, if we change the input voltage with the dimmer to say about 90 volts, we get:

Low = 90 / 71 = 1.28 --> 90 * 1.28 = 115 watts

This is 87 watts lower than the factory set position. The only thing is, we don’t have the actual temperature settings for each wattage (i.e. 202 watts = 230 degrees, etc), but a little trial and error with the dimmer and a thermometer would easily allow you to find the perfect cooking temps of the old days that is around 170 degrees.

And that concludes today’s DIY electronics lesson!

Oh, but if you do try this, then make sure you get a dimmer rated for the max your slow cooker can draw. On the bottom of mine there is a UL sticker that states it is rated to 250 watts. The dimmer I’ve linked to is 300 watts, so it is perfectly fine for my cooker. All slow cookers should have a UL sticker showing it’s max possible power consumption (wattage used). If there isn't a sticker then calculate max power using the VOM readings for your cooker and formulas given here.
keltin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2007, 07:59 PM   #40
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 16,226
Brilliant, keltin. Now, all those folks with the newfangled "hot" crock-pots can have the same wonderful cooking experience as those of us who have the older crock-pots. Good thinking.

However, how many people will actually make the change...that's the real question.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:08 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.