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Old 08-19-2017, 04:37 PM   #1
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Breading your vegetables or hands

When you are breading, do you do the

One hand dry
The other hand wet method.

Or do you just jump in and get the job done! Worry about the messy hands later.

I am in the middle of breading three eggplants. Sorry I ever started. After that I have three pork chops that have been marinating in a soy sauce liquid since last night.
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Old 08-19-2017, 04:43 PM   #2
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I do the wet hand - Dry hand technique when I bread anything and, being a southern girl, that's fairly often. We do love our breaded and deep fried food down here. If you aren't sure how to cook it, bread it and fry it, it can't be totally bad that way. :P
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Old 08-19-2017, 05:15 PM   #3
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My intent is to do wet/dry hands but it doesn't always end that way.
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Old 08-19-2017, 05:18 PM   #4
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For sushi, yes, wax on wax off.
Umm, 1 dry, 1 wet.

Everything else gets made right next to the sink, so rinsing fingers between stages isn't a problem.
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Old 08-19-2017, 05:29 PM   #5
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My intent is to do wet/dry hands but it doesn't always end that way.
I know the feeling well. Breading eggplant today, One large Italian one and two small Japanese one. It would be done by now, but I can't stand that long. So I unplug the fryer, sit for a while and back to work. There are times when I have enough breading on my hands to plop them into the fryer.
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Old 08-19-2017, 06:34 PM   #6
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My intent is to do wet/dry hands but it doesn't always end that way.

Exactly!!!.. I always forget which is which...

Ross
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Old 08-19-2017, 07:03 PM   #7
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My intent is to do wet/dry hands but it doesn't always end that way.
I start off with good intentions, too, but by the end, everything is messy, from my hands to half the kitchen.

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Old 08-19-2017, 07:21 PM   #8
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There are times when I have enough breading on my hands to plop them into the fryer.
Not that good of an idea. I hear the green thumbs taste like kale chips. The middle of the hand tastes like hearts of palm.
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Old 08-19-2017, 07:48 PM   #9
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My intent is to do wet/dry hands but it doesn't always end that way.
Me too.
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Old 08-19-2017, 08:05 PM   #10
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I don't do either. I use a pigtail turner that has freed me from the dreaded breading fingers. It does all the picking up and breading for me. I simply poke the turner into the targeted food, dip, dunk or whatever and slip it off the turner. Haven't had any breading issues since I began using my handy little piggy.
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Old 08-19-2017, 09:16 PM   #11
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Not that good of an idea. I hear the green thumbs taste like kale chips. The middle of the hand tastes like hearts of palm.
Gives a whole new meaning to "finger food."

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Old 08-20-2017, 02:17 AM   #12
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I try but I get confused and then I get dough hands... So yeah wet concrete!
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Old 08-20-2017, 10:57 AM   #13
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I'm not really sure what I do. Or for that matter what does the above mention technic means. Care to explain, please.
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Old 08-20-2017, 11:17 AM   #14
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I'm not really sure what I do. Or for that matter what does the above mention technic means. Care to explain, please.
Charlie when you are breading your food, like a veal cutlet or a vegetable with flour, egg and breadcrumbs. You dip the food in the flour first, with just one hand, while you keep the other hand out of the way. Then you take it out of the flour and dip it in the egg, and repeat for the breadcrumbs. All the time using one hand to handle the food, while the other hand stays clean for frying.

That is how it is supposed to be done. But most people start out with that intention and end up using both hands. When they are done with the breading, they have as much egg and bread on both hands as there is on the food. It is an art to keep one hand clean. Not as easy as it sounds.
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Old 08-20-2017, 01:12 PM   #15
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Charlie when you are breading your food, like a veal cutlet or a vegetable with flour, egg and breadcrumbs. You dip the food in the flour first, with just one hand, while you keep the other hand out of the way. Then you take it out of the flour and dip it in the egg, and repeat for the breadcrumbs. All the time using one hand to handle the food, while the other hand stays clean for frying.
The way I learned to do it is to keep the left hand dry and use the right hand to dip into the egg, so it's the wet hand. So take a piece of food in your left hand (dry hand) and dredge it in the flour. Use your right hand (wet hand) to remove it from the flour and dip it into the egg. Use the same hand to remove it from the egg, letting excess drip off, and lay it on the bread/panko crumbs. Use your left/dry hand to turn it in the crumbs, pressing to adhere, and the same left/dry hand to place it on a rack on a sheet pan. Continue till all the food is coated.

Works for me
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:22 PM   #16
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The way I learned to do it is to keep the left hand dry and use the right hand to dip into the egg, so it's the wet hand. So take a piece of food in your left hand (dry hand) and dredge it in the flour. Use your right hand (wet hand) to remove it from the flour and dip it into the egg. Use the same hand to remove it from the egg, letting excess drip off, and lay it on the bread/panko crumbs. Use your left/dry hand to turn it in the crumbs, pressing to adhere, and the same left/dry hand to place it on a rack on a sheet pan. Continue till all the food is coated.

Works for me
I'm not trying to argue, but I thought you took the food out of the dry with the dry hand, into the wet, turning with the wet, out with the wet and laying it onto the dry, using the dry to turn and onto plate or into oil as case may be. Obviously, you just pick it up by the edge of 1 end so you keep from getting fingers wet or crumby.
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:32 PM   #17
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Charlie when you are breading your food, like a veal cutlet or a vegetable with flour, egg and breadcrumbs. You dip the food in the flour first, with just one hand, while you keep the other hand out of the way. Then you take it out of the flour and dip it in the egg, and repeat for the breadcrumbs. All the time using one hand to handle the food, while the other hand stays clean for frying.

That is how it is supposed to be done. But most people start out with that intention and end up using both hands. When they are done with the breading, they have as much egg and bread on both hands as there is on the food. It is an art to keep one hand clean. Not as easy as it sounds.
I don't think Charlie can use meat and egg together. I think eggs are considered dairy.
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:40 PM   #18
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I'm not trying to argue, but I thought you took the food out of the dry with the dry hand, into the wet, turning with the wet, out with the wet and laying it onto the dry, using the dry to turn and onto plate or into oil as case may be. Obviously, you just pick it up by the edge of 1 end so you keep from getting fingers wet or crumby.
I think either way will work. The key is to is to keep one hand dry and not touch the egg with it at all. So it's not wet hand/clean hand, as Addie described it.
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Old 08-20-2017, 02:41 PM   #19
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I don't think Charlie can use meat and egg together. I think eggs are considered dairy.
"... eggs are considered a separate entity once they have been laid and are considered to be pareve, or neutral, so that they can be eaten with either milk or meat."

http://www.chabad.org/library/articl...ggs-pareve.htm
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Old 08-20-2017, 05:48 PM   #20
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I just watched 2 video's of breading chicken and .... something else, I forget now, and they used both hands! LOL. One was Japanese, the other Chinese. I couldn't believe how clean their hands were thru the whole process!

I personally have always done it as GG describes, which a lot of the celebrity chefs are showing how to do (actually me Gramma showed me many many years ago).

I have only one correction to GG's way.
1. 'Dry' hand dips food into flour. 'Dry' hand picks up food and slips it into egg/milk mixture but do not let your 'Dry' hand touch the mixture.
2. 'Wet' hand then turns food to coat thoroughly with egg/milk mixture (if necessary), lifts it up and lets it drip a bit then places it into bread/panko/crumb mixture.
3. Here I sometimes use a plate but more often use a piece of wax paper for the crumb mix. If using paper, left edges of paper and flip the crumbs onto the wet food. If a plate, use 'dry' hand to start flipping (you can use a spoon) the crumbs onto the food. Now you can flip it over and pat the crumbs on with your dry hand. Transfer to your rack. repeat with the rest... works for me!
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