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Old 08-15-2005, 12:01 AM   #21
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Australians go the italian road, its zucchini (isntead of courgettes/summer squash) for us.
Really want to go get some eggplant, but my fridge is chock full with other vegetables which I need to devour first.
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Old 08-15-2005, 01:48 AM   #22
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Eggplant/Zucchini

The British also say "aubergine" for eggplant.

They also say "courgette" for "zucchini".

I prefer courgette because it describes a particular kind of squash. Admittedly, "zucchini squash" (taken from the Italian" is just as explicit, but people rarely put the two words together.

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Old 08-15-2005, 02:30 AM   #23
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AlexR - I use the word aubergine because I'm British! I use the word courgette - ditto.... And we never refer to it as a courgette squash - as it is a type of what we call a MARROW!

The close historical relationship between Scotland and France, known as the Auld Alliance means that we use many, many French words for our foodstuffs and cooking methods. Indeed, in Scotland, the butchery of lamb, beef etc, follows the French style rather than the English - although English cuts of meat have become more commonly seen in our supermarkets - presumably because the meat is cut at a central distribution point and delivered all over the British Isles!
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Old 08-15-2005, 04:31 AM   #24
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Squash/Marrow

Ishbel,

I saw the message in my "in box" without seeing who it was from - which is why I mentioned the British connection.

I do not believe that marrow is the equivalent of squash. It can be, but the US term of squash is all-encompassing, which I believe the British one is not. A quick Web search shows that marrow in UK English describes a squash with dark green skin and whitish flesh.

The North American family of squash is ginormous, with the most amazing variety of shapes and colors.

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Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 04:58 AM   #25
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I can assure you, as a UK national that when you leave a courgette to grow - it becomes what we call a marrow. I've done it myself, too many times, not to recognise or indeed cook with the marrows that result from that moment's indecision of 'shall I pick or leave a few days?'


By the way - you called it a zucchini squash, not I ....

And you're right - we differentiate between marrows and squashes - although both are sold readily here - everything from pattypan to butternut to jewel squashes.
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Old 08-15-2005, 05:15 AM   #26
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Cross purposes...

Hi Ishbel,

I agree with everything you say, but we seem to be talking over each other's heads!

A courgette is a type of marrow in BE and, unless I am mistaken, it is not transformed from the former into the latter simply by attaining a certain size.

I never said that you called it zucchini squash... In the separate paragraph, I was referring to the US - and as I see just above - the Australian way of referring to this vegetable.

I was unaware that you can find a large variety of marrows (squashes) in the UK. Things have certainly changed there in recent years!
In America, the brightly colored and sometimes oddly shaped squash are used for decorative purposes in the fall.

The dictionaries I looked at also used the word "gourd," but I have rarely ever heard this.

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Old 08-15-2005, 05:16 AM   #27
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Spelling?

Or is squash one of those invariable plurals?

Alex
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Old 08-15-2005, 06:34 AM   #28
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We just call it plain old zucchini, not zucchini squash.

What I find interesting is how in Australia, for example, we call it a butternut pumpkin, as opposed to the UK/US which call it butternut squash. Never understood why, the only thing we refer to as a 'squash' is (as far as foodsubs.com goes) what you guys call a pattypan/scalloped/custard squash.
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Old 08-15-2005, 07:06 AM   #29
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Courgette/Marrow

Ishbel,

Yikes, my message got lost in cypberspace....

I think there's a little talking at cross purposes here....

My only mention of zucchini squash in a previous post referred only to the American - and as I see above, Australian - description.

As to the British words, courgette and marrow, I am in doubt as to the fact that size alone is a factor. In other words, you imply that a large courgette becomes a marrow. While this is undoubteldy true, can we not agree that a courgette is a member of the marrow family, whatever its size?

Finally, I see that the word "gourd" is used as well. I've rarely ever heard it, and for some reason I tend to associate it with sperical squash with hooked tops!

I am glad to see that you can now find a large variety of squash, marrow, whatever you want to call it, in the UK, where the food scene is much improved from when I first went there in the 70s.

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Alex R.
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Old 08-15-2005, 07:22 AM   #30
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But..... the 70s was a LOOONG time ago!

All those foods have been available from the earliest days.... but you just had to seek out suppliers.

I've been able to get various types of squash or pumpkin from a local greengrocer since the 60s....

Our local farmers' market is an amazing sight - almost up to French market standards - and in some cases, the produce is superior - especially our soft fruits, potatoes, carrots etc.
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Old 08-15-2005, 07:31 AM   #31
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And, I'll grant you that...

English apples are better than French ones...

There was a Marks & Spencer in Bordeaux for about 10 years. We used to go there to get exotic stuff like cottage cheese, farmhouse cheddar (yum, the further up the scale, the better), British bacon, pecan pie, foreign wines and Indian foods.

Alex
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Old 08-15-2005, 08:02 AM   #32
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I love Davidstow cheddar - but my absolute favourite, matured farmhouse cheddar is from the Isle of Mull. The Mull of Kintyre also make a good cheddar-style cheese.
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Old 10-05-2005, 01:30 PM   #33
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I have noticed that the eggplant we get today is way different then what my dad cooked for us when I was a kid almost 40 years ago. (i am over 40 but don't remember that far back) back then you did need to sweat them but what they have today are a much sweeter product and no longer need to be sweated. (is that the word ) so I only sweat them if I am using a really large eggplant. small and medium sized ones don't get that extra treatment. Hope this helps. YOu cant get the apples we used to get when we were kids either on the store shelves.
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Old 10-05-2005, 10:58 PM   #34
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I use the recipe my great grandmother used for eggplant parmesan. She always peeled the eggplant and then layered it between flour sack towels and put something heavy on top for at least an hour. This is to get some of the water out of it before you fry it, otherwise you just get mush. Then I dip it in flour, then an egg beaten with a little milk, and seasoned bread crumbs. Fry it in vegetable oil or olive oil and drain on paper towels. Begin layering in a baking dish with spagetti sauce on the bottom, then a layer of eggplant, then grated mozzarella and parmesan. Continue until you've used all the eggplant. Finish with some sauce and cheese. Bake at 350 degrees farenheit until the edges are bubbly. Cool slightly and serve.
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Old 10-05-2005, 11:03 PM   #35
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oh, i forgot to mention that she came to the US from Italy in the early 1900's so my family loves all her recipes and thinks they are quite accurate ways to cook italian food.
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Old 05-29-2012, 09:27 AM   #36
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Aubergines

Thanks for the tips guys ive just cooked my first aubergine/eggplant lol, loving this forum
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Old 05-29-2012, 09:40 AM   #37
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I started leaving the skin on when I started making ratatouille. I like several colours of pepper in it too. That makes it a pretty, colourful dish. A friend of mine peels her eggplants and only uses green peppers. Her ratatouille is a yucky looking grey mess, but still tastes pretty good.
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Old 05-29-2012, 10:08 AM   #38
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Unless explicitly instructed to do otherwise in a recipe, I always leave the skins on eggplants. Regarding "sweating" with salt, I've heard that's only necessary with older specimens, which tend to be somewhat bitter. In any case, I've never used that technique on a young, fresh eggplant.
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Old 05-29-2012, 10:18 AM   #39
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Buonasera,

Depends on the recipe.

Normally, I do not peel eggplant or aubergine.

For Babaghanuj ( Mutabal ) Dip of course I peel it ...

Interesting thread.

Grazie,
Ciao.
Margaux Cintrano.
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Old 05-29-2012, 12:06 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexR View Post
I don't know exactly why , but I have always peeled eggplant before frying or baking.

However, someone made lunch for me at my own house a couple of weeks ago, and she simply cut the eggplant up into chunks, skin and all, and chucked it into the ratatouille.

This tasted just fine, and I'm just about ready to revise my judgement.

Also, you read and you hear that eggplant should be "sweated" first, by applying salt and then rubbing with a vegetable with towel, *particularly* if it is to be fried.

I've tended to do this in the past, but I'm wondering if this is not unnecessarily fastidious.

What do you think?

Best regards,
Alex R.
Is Alex still in the house? :)

I like the skin, & rarely peel. Depends on the dish. If I'm making eggplant balls, I peel. For a striped effect, use a vegetable peeler & slice down the sides in intervals.

Grilled eggplant is another way to go. Slice & brush with oil, grill & stuff with ricotta & seasonings & roll up.
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