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Old 06-27-2022, 02:06 AM   #1
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Greens for Stir Fry

Neither one of us are big veggie eaters, so I do what I can to mix them in with stews or pasta dishes, etc. In this case, it was a shrimp teriyaki stir fry. All the usual suspects showed up; carrots, green onions, mushrooms, orange and yellow bell peppers, and...broccoli.

Didn't use much, just the florettes, and still The Man says, "That was good, but the broccoli...what other green things can we use?"

He suggested green beans. That just didn't appeal to me at all. I considered spinach. What do you all suggest?

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Old 06-27-2022, 02:23 AM   #2
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Green beans can be improved with lardons of bacon, or a smoky ham bone. They are wonderful with smoked pork chops. When I make those, I buy about two pounds of green beans for just the two of us. Two generous smoked chops get quickly seared on each side, then pile in the green beans and about 1/4 cup of water. Cover and simmer until the beans are very tender. Be sure to leave enough beans to go with the chop that will be left; the beans are the better part of this meal.

Spinach? My favorite recipe for them is a chicken and barley stew. Because we have four true seasons here, I tend to save soup and stew recipes for the colder months. But this is one meal that we both agree is worthy of warm weather eating if we get the taste for it.

Quick Chicken and Barley Stew I often put more carrots and spinach in than what is called for in the recipe. It's great with rotisserie chicken. And I don't use quick cook barley, just cook up regular in broth at the same time and add to the pot when it's cooked.

Try roasting the broccoli. Toss it in oil and seasonings, spread on cookie sheet, and roast at 400 for about 20 minutes. Grate fresh Parmigiana-Reggiano, Grana Padana, or another favorite hard cheese over it.
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Old 06-27-2022, 04:31 AM   #3
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Stir Fry? The first thing that comes to mind is Chinese cabbage! Bok choy, pak choy, Napa cabbage - they all go wonderfully well with stir frys, Chinese/East Asian food, soups, etc. Just cut the cabbage up fine and stir fry with the rest of the veg. They´re ever so slightly sweet and maintain their crispiness after cooking.
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Old 06-27-2022, 04:59 AM   #4
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CG: BACON! Oh yes. That one sounds good to try. Had to go look up "lardons". Look at that, the sun's not even up yet over here and I've learned something new. I like the chicken/barley stew, too. Thanks!

Kara: Yes! Cabbage! Sheesh...totally forgot about it. Forgive me, O'Ancestors of Easter European Descent. Thanks for the reminder. Now I want to go get some Bok Choy and try again.
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Old 06-27-2022, 06:42 AM   #5
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When I have chard in the garden, I use it in stir-fry. I use the stalks like celery and the leaves like spinach.
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Old 06-27-2022, 07:31 AM   #6
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Celery? I often put celery in Stir Fry's. More for the crunch than the colour.

But honestly, as Karade has said - all of the Bok's and Choy's.

CG - I've marked your mentions, groan, making me hungry at 8:30 am Green Beans and Ham, Barley, double groans...
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Old 06-27-2022, 08:24 AM   #7
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I love baby or mini Bok choy, and snow peas in stir fry’s and wonton soup. Throw them in at the end and barely cook them. That way they stay tender but not mushy.
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Old 06-27-2022, 08:47 AM   #8
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And don't forget water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, baby corn, snow peas, sugar snap peas, radish, and fresh bean sprouts. Celery is also dood, as well as green onion, rough choped onion, leeks, watercress, and mushrooms.

I'm sure there are more things, like peanuts, cashews, not to mention oranges, and pineapple. Others will give you more ideas for your stir fries.

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Old 06-27-2022, 09:08 AM   #9
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Yes! All of those are great suggestions. Especially the pineapple. The Man likes that a lot.

Thanks, Chief!
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Old 06-27-2022, 11:26 AM   #10
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FYI, in case you didn't know, it took me years and I actually think I found out about it here on DC.

Those canned vegies for stir fry - water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, baby corn - really need to be rinsed several times. Gets rid of that 'canned' taste.
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Old 06-27-2022, 12:06 PM   #11
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Deb, for myself and DH, sometimes it's a textural thing too.
Neither of us care for any kind of veg that is cooked beyond a crisp-tender.
Even the method of cooking can change the world.
For example, both of us DID NOT like Brussel Sprouts.
Many years ago when we were still courting, he took but East to meet his family.
My then future SIL made us all a wonderful, table-groaning meal, served family style.
As the bowls of food went around the table, some dish of green leaves was passed to DH. He whispers to me, "WTH is this c---?"
"I don't know, but I think it smells like Brussel Sprouts. You have to be polite though, take just a little and push it around on your plate, make it look like you're full and leave it there", I replied.
As my future in-laws were all staring at me, I took a small bite ... "MAN! That's really good!"
From point on, we regularly have Brussel Sprouts ala Patricia.
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Old 06-27-2022, 12:14 PM   #12
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So very true (says the gal who loves both liver, and Brussel sprouts, and can't stand catfish). Textures like cornmeal, salmon roe, and creamy are my favorites. Broccoli can't be raw or crunchy cooked, my system rebels at it. Cauliflower, no problem.

I once read that people who don't like veggies are often those who are sensitive to bitter. Kinda like people who react to cilantro or horseradish like it's turpentine.
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Old 06-27-2022, 01:44 PM   #13
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I find that pretty much any kind of leafy greens, cut into smallish pieces, are a nice addition to a stir fry. A lot of the leafy greens are more bitter than we usually like, so I was delighted to find this method of using them. I haven't tried more than a handful in a stir fry for two. I have added them at the end, just long enough to wilt them.
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Old 06-27-2022, 01:48 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
FYI, in case you didn't know, it took me years and I actually think I found out about it here on DC.

Those canned vegies for stir fry - water chestnuts, bamboo shoots, baby corn - really need to be rinsed several times. Gets rid of that 'canned' taste.
Oh! I didn't know that. I tried some canned bean sprouts. I tasted a couple and threw it out. Gah! That was nasty. Do those taste good rinsed a few times? I have no issue with the taste of fresh bean sprouts, but I can't be bothered to break off all the roots. It's a long, tedious job.
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Old 06-27-2022, 04:35 PM   #15
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Taxlady, There are two ways to grow mung bean sprouts.
The first way, soak for overnight, drain, then rinse 2x/day for 3-4 days, then the hardest part is scooping off the seed hulls that have separated from the sprout. There is no root to remove.
The second way, fill a flat with an inch or so of dirt. Drop the seeds into it, press them into the soil, water, cover with newspaper (they don't need light). After 5 days, cut them off at the soil level leaving any root behind.
I've never had the roots attached to the sprout, to remove.
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Old 06-27-2022, 05:15 PM   #16
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Quote:
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Taxlady, There are two ways to grow mung bean sprouts.
The first way, soak for overnight, drain, then rinse 2x/day for 3-4 days, then the hardest part is scooping off the seed hulls that have separated from the sprout. There is no root to remove.
The second way, fill a flat with an inch or so of dirt. Drop the seeds into it, press them into the soil, water, cover with newspaper (they don't need light). After 5 days, cut them off at the soil level leaving any root behind.
I've never had the roots attached to the sprout, to remove.
I hadn't even thought of growing them myself. I have used that first method, but it was decades ago. I don't remember if they had roots. I know I used them without removing any roots. I remember them being fine. Thanks for the suggestion.
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Old 06-27-2022, 05:40 PM   #17
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Taxlady, these are probably broccoli sprouts. They are green on top, so probably after a few days, let them get a little sun, then they green up. Cut with a kitchen shears. Mung bean sprouts have thicker stems but essentially do the same thing.

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Old 06-27-2022, 06:03 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Taxlady, these are probably broccoli sprouts. They are green on top, so probably after a few days, let them get a little sun, then they green up. Cut with a kitchen shears. Mung bean sprouts have thicker stems but essentially do the same thing.

I buy some sprouts that way, but not often. I find it's hard to cut them in those containers without getting some of the growth medium along with the sprouts. Next batch of sprouts I buy that way, I intend to trim at least one side of the container, to make it easier to cut them nicely, more from the side than the top. For cooking with, I prefer mung bean sprouts. The thinner stemmed sprouts are nice as a garnish on a sandwich or a salad.
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Old 06-27-2022, 06:22 PM   #19
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I like alfalfa sprouts in salad.
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Old 06-27-2022, 06:47 PM   #20
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I like all those little sprouts in salads, just to eat out of hand but I can't go thru them fast enough so rarely buy them anymore.

Mung beans, only once did I sit there and pull off the tiny brown end. I had just watched a coupld of videos where they were saying it was much better to do so.

Never again! Far too tedious! You don't notice when they are in a stir fry anyhow - so why? Maybe in a fresh salad you would notice but again, I can't be bothered and I don't mind the taste. I also use mung beans as a lettuce replacement in sandwiches, nice and crunchy, cool.
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