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Old 04-12-2020, 06:01 PM   #1
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Preserving butternut squash for later use

I have a slight dilemma. I had a great butternut squash year last year in the garden. Not only did I get a lot of them, but the ones I got are tremendous. It was a self planted seed ( must have been in the compost), so not sure of exact variety.

Anyway, I want to plant this variety. Only way to do that is to cut open one of the squashes I got downstairs and get the seeds out of it. The problem is, I did so many things with the first squash I cut open ( mostly soups) which are now in the freezer, I need another way to preserve the squash for later use. Worst case scenario, is Ill just make more soup, but was wondering what other ways to preserve it, or things to make that could freeze well. if not it will either rot, Ill have another huge pot of soup to freeze, Or Ill be eating butternut squash based foods for the next 2 weeks ( probably longer, these things are almost as big as my cat).

All suggestions welcome

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Old 04-12-2020, 06:19 PM   #2
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After peeling, boiling, or roasting, mashing, and draining the excess liquid, the squash meat freezes very well and can then be ussed in soups, pies, as a side veggie, and so on. Or, you could peel, cube, and blanch before freezing. Alternately, roast, drain, and can the squash for use as a pie filling, just like pumpkin.

Hope that helps.

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Old 04-12-2020, 06:25 PM   #3
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We halve ours then scoop out the seeds flat side down and roast. Then scrape out the meat. That can go directly into ziplocks or container and used in any recipes that call for squash.
You can do slices as well we just find scooped simple. Some recipes call for sliced squash but oh well purée it is it’s just as tasty.

But remember to clearly label them as butternut and acorn squash purée is easily mistaken for your frozen pumpkin (also a squash so makes sense) but will significantly change the taste of your dish or dessert.
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Old 04-12-2020, 06:35 PM   #4
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Claire and the squash

Thanks, Ill have enough squash to try ll suggestions
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Old 04-12-2020, 08:06 PM   #5
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Butternut is an ideal candidate for long term storage in a "root cellar". If you have a basement, it'll be cool enough to keep butternuts for months.

I usually roast a squash whole until it's soft then it's easy to seed and peel. Roasting drives off a lot of the excess moisture. The flesh, once mashed/pureed freezes well.
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Old 04-12-2020, 08:15 PM   #6
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Butternut is an ideal candidate for long term storage in a "root cellar". If you have a basement, it'll be cool enough to keep butternuts for months.

I usually roast a squash whole until it's soft then it's easy to seed and peel. Roasting drives off a lot of the excess moisture. The flesh, once mashed/pureed freezes well.
I probably have 2 years worth of squash ( For 2 people) in the basement . Im not even sure why im growing it again this year, but its nice to have something do exceptionally well in the garden. Could have been a fluke, but I want to give it another try this year. Normally I would just leave it downstairs with the others until Im ready to use its, but got to sacrifice one to get the seeds. I thought I saved seeds from the first one I cut open, but either I didn't, or I misplaced them.
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Old 04-12-2020, 09:33 PM   #7
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Larry, Something you may want to try in your new dehydrator - dry the butternut! Then grind it to a flour. It can be used as pumpkin in recipes, like breads or smooth soups. It dehydrates from 1 lb to 1 oz I usually use a little over an ounce of flour, and water to add up to a pound. The dried up cubes don't cook as well as dried eggplant, when left whole.

I often dry up last year's crop, from the basement, when it looks like there will be a lot this year.
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Old 04-13-2020, 06:01 AM   #8
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Larry, Something you may want to try in your new dehydrator - dry the butternut! Then grind it to a flour. It can be used as pumpkin in recipes, like breads or smooth soups. It dehydrates from 1 lb to 1 oz I usually use a little over an ounce of flour, and water to add up to a pound. The dried up cubes don't cook as well as dried eggplant, when left whole.

I often dry up last year's crop, from the basement, when it looks like there will be a lot this year.
Ill definitely give it a go. Ill have more than enough to try multiple methods. Thanks, ( Love the new dehydrator)
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Old 04-13-2020, 08:41 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by pepperhead212 View Post
Larry, Something you may want to try in your new dehydrator - dry the butternut! Then grind it to a flour. It can be used as pumpkin in recipes, like breads or smooth soups. It dehydrates from 1 lb to 1 oz I usually use a little over an ounce of flour, and water to add up to a pound. The dried up cubes don't cook as well as dried eggplant, when left whole.

I often dry up last year's crop, from the basement, when it looks like there will be a lot this year.
how big cubes do you cut it up to dry and what temp/ how long ?
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Old 04-13-2020, 11:04 AM   #10
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how big cubes do you cut it up to dry and what temp/ how long ?
I cut about 3/4" cubes, and dry them around 120° - usually a little more than a day, but I usually let them go a little longer than what seems like totally dry, so that they will grind into flour.

I have also ground the eggplant into flour, and used both of these (not in the same recipe) in Indian flatbreads, with great results. I just replaced some of the atta flour with the veggie flour, though I had to play around with them, to get the right moisture in them.
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Old 04-16-2020, 01:46 PM   #11
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Its amazing how such a big squash could reduced to so little when dehydrated.
But, worked like a charm.
there was a little butternut powder on the sides and bottom of blender. Didn't want it to go to waste so dumped in some hot water, a little bullion powder and was like butternut squash cup of soup.

Biggest PIA was pealing the squash. What a pain in the rump.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:21 PM   #12
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Larry, What I usually do to to peel it is cut the top and bottom off, then cut it about where the neck starts to get larger. Then I slice down the neck with a knife, to peel it, then slice it into the 3/4" slices, then cubes. The larger area, wit the seeds, I slice into 3/4 " slices, then slice the skin off, bit by bit. Then, I take a paring knife and cut out the circle of the fiber and the seeds, then cut the cubes. It probably doesn't take much longer to do this, than it did to type this! And this might waste a little more, compared to a peeler, but it all goes into the compost, which I know yours does, too.

I like the way you rinsed out the blender, so you wouldn't waste any! I'm always doing things like that.
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Old 04-16-2020, 02:44 PM   #13
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Larry,

I like the way you rinsed out the blender, so you wouldn't waste any! I'm always doing things like that.
Yeah, I figure with the effort I took to grow it, harvest it, store it, prepare it and cook it, process it and store it again, I dont want to waste anything And yes, nothing ever goes to waste if its not me, then its the chickens or compost.

A few years back, I had a behind the scenes tour of an international food exhibit at the Museum of Natural History in NYC. The guy who was giving us the tour was trying to stump us by telling us how much food goes to waste, and how the supply or conditions in many countries aren't enough to support the population. But every time he though a question to my kids about waste, they'd come back with an answer" compost, chickens, dehydrate, garden ...." The guy looked at us and basically said that we had it all covered. im sure most families it would have been all new to them, bt I was actually kinda proud that my kids ' got it'.

My daughter just moved out a year ago, lives in an apt outside of Baltimore, and just Called the other day cause she wants to start a garden in pots on her patio. Im glad it got passed down to the next generation.

but yeah, nothing goes to waste if I can help it. down to the last drop !

and thanks for the butchering tips on the squash.
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