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Old 03-11-2020, 12:58 AM   #1
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Ways with aspargus..

Asparagus is just about my favorite green vegetable. Most often I roast it with olive oil and seasonings on a sheet pan. Delicious.
We all know about blanching vegetables in boiling water for a short period, and finishing in an ice bath. It's a guessing game at best, with varied results.
However, today I learned a new method (for me) how to "cook" it perfectly crisp tender for salads or additions to recipes.

This method is fool proof for one bunch of spring asparagus, "cooked" to crisp tender, with no guessing and no effort.

Snap off the woody end pieces, and lay the well salted asparagus in a shallow pan.
Pour boiling water over them enough to cover, and use plastic wrap to cover the pan. Let them sit in the boiling water till just warm to the touch. Cut them (or not) into pieces as required.


They will be perfectly crisp tender for any application, such as salads or classic Risotto for example.


Do you have a favorite way with this wonderful spring veggie?
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Old 03-11-2020, 05:39 AM   #2
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Thanks, Kayelle.

Sounds simple enough I'll give it a try!

I grew up with asparagus cut into chunks and cooked in as little water as possible. At the end of the cooking time whole milk, a knob of butter and black pepper were added. It was served in soup plates as a meal with bread and butter.

If you have a few crisp-tender spears of asparagus leftover add them to the filling of a grilled cheese sandwich with a slice or two of crisp bacon.
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Old 03-11-2020, 11:53 AM   #3
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Does anyone peel the woody stems? I have been cutting them off, but next time I will try to peel them. Loose less of this precious gift.
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Old 03-11-2020, 12:50 PM   #4
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I like your ideas Bea and RB.

Sometimes I peel the ends like you do RB, especially if they are fat instead of slender.


I'd guess everyone knows by now that it's not necessary to snap all of them individually. Just snap one, and use it to measure where to cut the rest of the bunch.

Thank you Rachel Ray.
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Old 03-11-2020, 04:16 PM   #5
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steamed is my fav. pretty foolproof - trim - stack up in steamer or lotus insert - 12 minutes, all done.


for firmer 'tips' etc to be used in other dishes, 10 minutes.
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Old 03-11-2020, 04:48 PM   #6
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Occasionally Ill peel the lower part of the stem, but I must have a heavy hand, cause when I do it, half of them break a the tougher junction anyway

Ive tried peeling them laying down on the cutting board , but it hurts my back ( sorry, bad joke)

Anyway, I just eyeball it, cut it where I think it needs to be cut and thats it,

Il do anything from steam to quick boil, roast, grill ...
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:37 PM   #7
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I'm not that big a fan of asparagus, but DH likes it so I make it sometimes. I usually roast it as you do, finishing it with lemon juice or balsamic. When I want to add it as an ingredient, I steam it in the microwave for a minute to 90 seconds till it's as tender as I want.
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Old 03-11-2020, 08:53 PM   #8
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I have a tart recipe with gruyere and asparagus - just love it - don't make it often but love it! Also a spring vegie and goat cheese tart, yummy.

Some mornings while poaching my egg(s) I'll stick one or two spears into the water . Place them on the toast before the egg goes on top.

I always use a large frying/saute pan to boil them. Shallow water boils faster, easier to test so as not to over cook. Depending on thickness but generally takes around 5 min.

Sheet pan roasting is also a favourite.

Asparagus - one of my top veggies - too bad I suffer the consequences in the arthritic joints after but... suffer I do!
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Old 03-12-2020, 08:49 AM   #9
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Roasted in oven and covered with Parm cheese
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Old 03-12-2020, 09:51 AM   #10
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My favorite way to cook them is to grill them. I toss them in olive oil, salt and pepper. Then just a minute or two to get grill marks. Very good.
We love asparagus. But like GG, many folks do not like them. I was a little surprised.

Oh....I saw a recipe in the Costco Connection called asparagus fries. Basically lightly breaded and roasted in a hot oven. They looked really good.
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Old 03-12-2020, 09:58 AM   #11
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I think asparagus is okay. DH really dislikes it. So, I don't buy them. I haven't cooked them in decades.
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Old 03-12-2020, 11:54 AM   #12
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We like thin asparagus. But if they are thick I sometimes peel ends. Snap ends and rinse. Place in a Pyrex glass rectangle dish, cover with microwave cover. NO WATER they have enough moisture from the rinse. Steam for about 7 minutes till crisp tender. Serve

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If there is any leftover add to an egg scramble.
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Old 03-12-2020, 12:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roll_Bones View Post
We love asparagus. But like GG, many folks do not like them. I was a little surprised.
To me, they have a slightly bitter flavor that I don't enjoy. DH loves bitter flavors - IPAs and gin & tonic. Me, I like pink wine and a good Cosmo
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Old 03-12-2020, 06:41 PM   #14
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I love asparagus and have so many in my garden. I only plant what is expensive, so asparagus is part of it. It is considered a weed, and comes back every year, for about 20 years. It can be cooked and eaten so many ways. If you are lucky, they will come again in the fall and taste much better then (KY).
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Old 03-13-2020, 05:38 AM   #15
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To me, they have a slightly bitter flavor that I don't enjoy. DH loves bitter flavors - IPAs and gin & tonic. Me, I like pink wine and a good Cosmo
You are correct GG, they DO have a slightly bitter flavour in their skins. But I not enough to deter me! I've also found the older the asparagus the more it becomes pronounced. If you ever get the chance to try fresh picked, straight from the ground, you might notice it's less.

Question:- I've read that the thickness of asparagus is indicative of the age. Thicker older plant, skinny = new shoot. Then why is the small asparagus patch growing on the edge of one of my paddocks so skinny? Been there since I moved here in 2006.

Question:- what's an IPA?
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Old 03-13-2020, 07:04 AM   #16
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skinny spears are indicative of
- a young patch, takes 3-4 year to establish
- inadequate nutrition, they are heavy feeders
- exhausted crowns, as the season goes on the spears get thinner
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Old 03-13-2020, 10:01 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
You are correct GG, they DO have a slightly bitter flavour in their skins. But I not enough to deter me! I've also found the older the asparagus the more it becomes pronounced. If you ever get the chance to try fresh picked, straight from the ground, you might notice it's less.

Question:- I've read that the thickness of asparagus is indicative of the age. Thicker older plant, skinny = new shoot. Then why is the small asparagus patch growing on the edge of one of my paddocks so skinny? Been there since I moved here in 2006.

Question:- what's an IPA?
IPA = India Pale Ale

I always assumed that younger meant the age of the sprout, not the plant. But, I have no experience with growing or harvesting them.
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Old 03-13-2020, 11:25 AM   #18
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Thanks taxy.

There is an asparagus farm just north-east of Montebello. When we passed by in the spring we could go in a buy. Later in the year you would see their fields gone to seed. Looked like fairy's had magically created green clouds to hide their forests.

Don't go that route anymore - should make an effort this spring.
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Old 03-13-2020, 12:41 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
You are correct GG, they DO have a slightly bitter flavour in their skins. But I not enough to deter me! I've also found the older the asparagus the more it becomes pronounced. If you ever get the chance to try fresh picked, straight from the ground, you might notice it's less.

Question:- I've read that the thickness of asparagus is indicative of the age. Thicker older plant, skinny = new shoot. Then why is the small asparagus patch growing on the edge of one of my paddocks so skinny? Been there since I moved here in 2006.

Question:- what's an IPA?
I did have that opportunity once. When I was in culinary school, one of my instructors had planted a garden on the grounds, including asparagus. He was trying to get a garden club going. I tasted a young sprout and it was definitely more grassy and sweet than older, thicker spears.

IPA is DH's favorite craft beer. It's really bitter. I can't drink it.
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Old 03-13-2020, 04:13 PM   #20
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I wonder if there are different strains , there must be. The asparagus we used to get at this farm in the early spring when they would first open would be a good size. Not overly thick and not skinny, but just the way I like them. So I'm inclined to go with dcSaute's explanation. Age of the plant and nutrition.

Might try dumping a bit of fertilizer on the paddock one.
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Ways with aspargus.. Asparagus is just about my favorite green vegetable. Most often I roast it with olive oil and seasonings on a sheet pan. Delicious. We all know about blanching vegetables in boiling water for a short period, and finishing in an ice bath. It's a guessing game at best, with varied results. However, today I learned a new method (for me) how to "cook" it perfectly crisp tender for salads or additions to recipes. This method is fool proof for one bunch of spring asparagus, "cooked" to crisp tender, with no guessing and no effort. [B]Snap off the woody end pieces, and lay the well salted asparagus in a shallow pan. Pour boiling water over them enough to cover, and use plastic wrap to cover the pan. Let them sit in the boiling water till just warm to the touch. Cut them (or not) into pieces as required.[/B] They will be perfectly crisp tender for any application, such as salads or classic Risotto for example. Do you have a favorite way with this wonderful spring veggie?:chef: 3 stars 1 reviews
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