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Old 05-07-2012, 07:05 AM   #21
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bok bok bok ba GAWK!
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Old 05-07-2012, 11:10 AM   #22
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bok bok bok ba GAWK!
now steady on bucky you only wanted me to slurp that devils brew so that you could hear an englishman scream,whatever happened to "the special relationship" thought you guy's were on our side!!
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Old 05-08-2012, 02:55 AM   #23
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Hi,

This sauce from Dave is extremely hot largely because it contains pepper extract (capsiacin) which is the oil from the chilli which creates the heat.

Personally, I find sauces containing capsiacin have a metallic/chemical flavour edge to them which does not appeal to me - I much prefer sauces only containing 'natural' chillies as opposed to a chemically extracted component of the fruit. And Dave does some excellent sauces containing just chillies.

If you love really hot sauces definitely go for the ghost chilli (also known as the Naga Bhut Jolokia) ones, but you may wish to start with something a little less challenging and flavourful. I have found a brand in the UK called Hot Headz and they make a wonderful range of chilli sauces using only single variety chillies. The mildest one they make and which I have tried is a Pasilla Chilli sauce which is delicious, full of flavour and extra mild; I eat it by the desert spoon full. They then go up the heat scale all the way to Naga, which is delightfully hot, if you like serious heat. I particularly like the Serrano, Chipotle and Jalapeno flavours - none of them real scorchers but each with a fantastic flavour. Well worth a look - just google Hot Headz if you're interested. Hope this helps.
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Old 05-08-2012, 03:12 AM   #24
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Hi,

This sauce from Dave is extremely hot largely because it contains pepper extract (capsiacin) which is the oil from the chilli which creates the heat.

Personally, I find sauces containing capsiacin have a metallic/chemical flavour edge to them which does not appeal to me - I much prefer sauces only containing 'natural' chillies as opposed to a chemically extracted component of the fruit. And Dave does some excellent sauces containing just chillies.

If you love really hot sauces definitely go for the ghost chilli (also known as the Naga Bhut Jolokia) ones, but you may wish to start with something a little less challenging and flavourful. I have found a brand in the UK called Hot Headz and they make a wonderful range of chilli sauces using only single variety chillies. The mildest one they make and which I have tried is a Pasilla Chilli sauce which is delicious, full of flavour and extra mild; I eat it by the desert spoon full. They then go up the heat scale all the way to Naga, which is delightfully hot, if you like serious heat. I particularly like the Serrano, Chipotle and Jalapeno flavours - none of them real scorchers but each with a fantastic flavour. Well worth a look - just google Hot Headz if you're interested. Hope this helps.
hi fm
thanks for the input.really confirms what the other guy's have said.i love food & i enjoy heat when i want it(chillies of choice for cooking are scotch bonnet,bird eye & habanero) but it is crucial that i can taste the food & the input that the chilli makes.as i said in an earlier reply heat for heats sake,i'll leave to adam richman,man v food et al!
okey schmokey,maybe a new thread on favourite home made chilli sauce recipe's?
anyone out there still reading this thread? what's your fav home made chilli sauce recipe?
cheers fm
harry
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Old 05-08-2012, 06:58 AM   #25
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hi fm
thanks for the input.really confirms what the other guy's have said.i love food & i enjoy heat when i want it(chillies of choice for cooking are scotch bonnet,bird eye & habanero) but it is crucial that i can taste the food & the input that the chilli makes.as i said in an earlier reply heat for heats sake,i'll leave to adam richman,man v food et al!
okey schmokey,maybe a new thread on favourite home made chilli sauce recipe's?
anyone out there still reading this thread? what's your fav home made chilli sauce recipe?
cheers fm
harry
Chipotle and apricot or mango.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:03 AM   #26
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Chipotle and apricot or mango.
"anyone out there still reading this thread? what's your fav home made chilli sauce recipe?"
and the recipe is...............?!
harry
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:26 AM   #27
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I had a friend from Guyana who made a fabulous, very hot, homemade chili sauce, but he wouldn't give me the recipe and now he has moved to BC (British Columbia), Canada. So, I don't have a recipe.
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Old 05-08-2012, 11:07 AM   #28
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I had a friend from Guyana who made a fabulous, very hot, homemade chili sauce, but he wouldn't give me the recipe and now he has moved to BC (British Columbia), Canada. So, I don't have a recipe.
try this one tax,it's more of a marinade really but works as a sauce too(note the precise measurements)
harry's home made piri piri:
1)2 or 3 roasted red peppers in oil/vinegar from a jar
2)4 or 6 thai bird eye chillies
3)teaspoon or two paprika
4)teaspoon or two dried cumin
5)50ml(just under quarter cup) red wine vinegar
6)25ml(half the above!) lemon juice
7)2 teaspoons maldon salt
8)2 teaspoons ground malibar pepper(kirkland is good if you use costco)
9)6 big fat cloves garlic
10)big pinch of sugar
chop up everything that can be chopped,put in a processor & whizz 'til smooth.in a covered container in the fridge for a few hours to allow the flavours to blend then use how you will.great as a marinade as the lemon/red wine vinegar tenderises the meat.
harry
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Old 05-08-2012, 12:26 PM   #29
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Chipotle chilli ketchup

I found this recipe on a fantastic UK food blog site 'Eat Like a Girl' . Brilliant, but go easy on the chipotles en adobe as they have a hell of a kick. I've bottled mine and keep it in the fridge.

Chipotle Ketchup

2 x 400g tins good tomatoes
5 chipotles en adobo (I got mine online from Hot Headz)
1 red onion, finely diced
3 cloves garlic, peeled and finely chopped
50ml cider vinegar
5og dark brown sugar

Method

Sauté the red onion in some light oil over a medium heat for about 5 minutes until soft but not brown. Add the garlic for a minute further before adding the rest of the ingredients.

Cook over a low hear for up to an hour, longer if you have it as tomato based dishes always benefit from a low slow cook. Taste and season. Blend and leave to the side.

Enjoy.

Here is the link to the blog page: Recipe: Black Pudding Croquettes with Chipotle Ketchup |
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Old 05-08-2012, 01:30 PM   #30
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looks good fm,i'll check out the web site too!
harry
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Old 05-08-2012, 05:38 PM   #31
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now steady on bucky you only wanted me to slurp that devils brew so that you could hear an englishman scream,whatever happened to "the special relationship" thought you guy's were on our side!!
my mom is norwegian and dad irish, so my relatives have got you surrounded... (of course you can escape through france, but then again you could just stay home and surrender, thus being just like a frenchie)
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Old 05-08-2012, 08:41 PM   #32
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bhut jolokia hottest pepper in the world !!!

Bhut jolokia is hottest pepper in the world !!!, 401 times hotter than tabasko !!!
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Old 05-08-2012, 09:05 PM   #33
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"anyone out there still reading this thread? what's your fav home made chilli sauce recipe?"
and the recipe is...............?!
harry
One jar of apricot preserves, add chipotle powder just until it is almost right for you and then stop and let sit and meld the flavors. Then try it and adjust. It's that simple! You can thin it with water if you like.

I like the canned chipotles in adobo for the mango sauce, it's a fresh salsa. Chop the ripe mango, add 1-2 (or more) chopped chipotles, thin sliced green onions and a little bit of chopped cilantro.

Love both of these on grilled chicken thighs. And the mango on a white fish.

Recipes, we don't need no stinkin' recipes
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Old 05-08-2012, 09:40 PM   #34
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Bhut jolokia is hottest pepper in the world !!!, 401 times hotter than tabasko !!!
I've heard the same said about the "ghost" peppers, or in milder times about the habanero peppers.

What practical difference does it make to professional and amateur/home chefs which is hottest? I've already made my opinion clear in this topic that for heat alone you can just add as much chili sauce as you like to achieve any desired hotness, including 'too hot,' 'very too much hot,' and 'black hole hot so strong that it sucks the rest of the universe into a black hole and destroys all reality.'

It doesn't matter what the hottest chilis are. What matters is the chili sauce you use, how much you add to get the desired hotness, and what other taste dimensions your sauce provides.

The same applies to ingredients, for example chilpotle peppers in adobo sauce. These are smoked jalapeño peppers in a vinegar + garlic + other herbs and tomatoes, onions, etc. sauce. This sauce is not particularly spicy to those used to Southwestern cuisine. The reason this condiment is so popular is because it is so dimensional. It adds taste dimensions that the hotness of capsicum cannot supply.

Mere hotness can supply only one dimension: hotness. You can always add more hotness to any recipe. The challenge is to add taste dimensionality. A simplistic way of looking at it is to add capsicum to achieve hotness, and then add dimensionality via other ingredients. I believe that skilled chefs add the hotness and taste dimensionality at the same time by choosing their ingredients and which chili sauces they employ.

BTW chilis are not peppers. This was a mistake made in the 15th century when New World chilis were imported to the Old World, and the chilis most resembled their extant pepper varieties. Chilis are in the genus Capsicum. Peppers are in the genus Piper. (Some peppers are genus Pimenta.) Both can be spicy and hot depending on species.
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Old 05-08-2012, 09:56 PM   #35
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...BTW chilis are not peppers. This was a mistake made in the 15th century when New World chilis were imported to the Old World, and the chilis most resembled their extant pepper varieties. Chilis are in the genus Capsicum. Peppers are in the genus Piper. (Some peppers are genus Pimenta.) Both can be spicy and hot depending on species.

Just to clarify. Piper is the genus for black pepper. Capsicums are chilies and bell peppers.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:08 PM   #36
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Just to clarify. Piper is the genus for black pepper. Capsicums are chilies and bell peppers.
I thought that's what I said. Bell peppers are not really peppers. They are merely Capsicums without venom.

So, um... What genus are white peppers? Y'know, the kind we get white pepper from.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:30 PM   #37
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I thought that's what I said. Bell peppers are not really peppers. They are merely Capsicums without venom.

So, um... What genus are white peppers? Y'know, the kind we get white pepper from.

I prefer the working hypothesis that there are two kinds of peppers - capsicums and pipers. I don't call peppers capsicums for the same reason I don't call black pepper piper.

White pepper is also piper. Same berry stripped of its outer shell.
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Old 05-08-2012, 10:49 PM   #38
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Andy: you missed my intended humor.

I usually use the separate terms 'chilis' and 'peppers' to refer respectively to Capsicum and Piper. I sometimes fall into the vernacular 'chili peppers' which refers to chilis alone (called chillis by some), because so many say 'chili peppers' (or 'chilli peppers') even though technically they are not peppers, they are only chilis.

And to make it worse we have bell peppers, and green, yellow and red bell peppers, all of them the same and none of them peppers, and damned little capsaicin in any of them!

It's all the damned fault of Christopher Columbus. First he discovers the New World and he calls its inhabitants Indians, then he brings chilis back to the Old World and calls them peppers, and finally he claims he discovered America even though the Scandinavians had been traveling there for hundreds or thousands of years.

With all the hulabaloo you he could have at least discovered India or China. Probably a good thing he didn't discover China or otherwise we'd be confusing Chinese and Indians to this day, but maybe without him we would have at least known that Native Americans are not from India. Or China.

Note that much of my post is intended as humor.
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Old 05-09-2012, 02:01 AM   #39
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my mom is norwegian and dad irish, so my relatives have got you surrounded... (of course you can escape through france, but then again you could just stay home and surrender, thus being just like a frenchie)
france? nah,they don't like the english,we've whupped 'em too many times over the centuries..........foods good tho'!
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Old 05-09-2012, 03:00 AM   #40
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Brother H as you are coming over this weekend is it going to be a chilli fest and if so Madge want to know how many toilet rolls she should put in the fridge
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