"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Pasta, Rice, Beans, Grains...
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 04-17-2021, 05:23 AM   #1
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: York
Posts: 142
Linguine vs Spaghetti

Can someone tell me what the difrence is in these? I go to suopermarkets in the UK Tesco and Morrisons. All see is Spaghetti.


Confused!

otuatail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 06:43 AM   #2
Senior Cook
 
ScottinPollock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: West slope of the Sierra Nevada
Posts: 487
The cross section of spaghetti is of course circular. Linguine, while similar in mass, has a rectangular cross section. Think of it like really narrow, thin fettuccine.
ScottinPollock is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 07:02 AM   #3
Senior Cook
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: York
Posts: 142
Ok so...
Pasta comes in difrent shapes and colours. Spaghetti and Linguine are just another pasta then.
otuatail is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 07:23 AM   #4
Senior Cook
 
ScottinPollock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2019
Location: West slope of the Sierra Nevada
Posts: 487
Yup.
ScottinPollock is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 07:48 AM   #5
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,948
Linguine is oval in cross-section, and is wider than spaghetti, but not as wide as is fettuccini. It's shape gives it a richer pastas flavor that stands up to hearty sauces such as Bechemel, Moroney, Alfredo, Bolognaise, Volute etc. It is used in pasta dishes such as:
Linguine with Garlic Sauce
Linguine with Shrimp Scampi
Linguini with Italian Chicken and Volute

Linguini is the pasta shape that pairs well with, scallops, crawfish, crab, lobster, and chicken, clam, nd other such proteins. It can also be used in place of spaghetti in carbonara, with pesto, and other herbal recipes.

Spaghetti comes in different thickness for different recipes.
Angel hair, also called Capellini, is the thinnest and works in
Angel Hair pasta with Grape Tomatoes, Garlic & Extra-Virgin Olive Oil
With Olives, Bell Peppers, Olive Oil, and Sweet onion
With a light Marinara Sauce
With Prmesan and Artichoke Hearts
More Like this

Spaghetti is most often used in:
Spaghetti with Marinara and Meatballs
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce (Ragu)
Spaghetti Bolognaise,
Spaghetti Carbonara
Spaghetti with pesto

You can, of course, be used in a variety of recipes. In the North American versions, it is usually serve without the sauce cooked into the noodles. The eater places the sauce over the plate of noodles.

In Italy, from what I've read, the sauce is mixed into the noodles, and often baked. The noodles are the focus of the dish, with the sauce adding flavor, almost like a seasoning.

Hope tis helps.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 09:35 AM   #6
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,706
I never buy spaghetti. We prefer linguine or fettuccine.
Roll_Bones is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-17-2021, 12:01 PM   #7
Master Chef
 
Rocklobster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Ottawa Valley, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 6,673
Linguine originated from hand made pasta which is why it is flat..almost like really thin fettuccine..they would roll the sheet up and slice it thinly before unraveling it and cooking it..Spagghetti came after they invented a plate for pressing it through...or..maybe it was a Chinese thing, as they invented the hand pulled noodles..interesting..
We prefer the larger spaghetti, as it holds up better and absorbs more of the sauce when I finish it in the pan..
Rocklobster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 06:52 AM   #8
Master Chef
 
expatgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Texas girl living in Kazakhstan
Posts: 5,587
we splurged on some fresh fettucine yesterday to go with my spicy meat sauce and it was delicious! What I liked about it was that it didn't take as long as the packaged kind of noodles. Next we're going try are the fresh stuffed pasta with a meat sauce.
__________________
The only difference between a "cook" and a "Chef" is who cleans up the kitchen.
expatgirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 01:28 PM   #9
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,948
A little off topic here; my new favorite noodle to go with a rich Sunday grave with meatballs, or a great Ragu/Ragout is Cavatapi. It's a corkscrew shaped macaroni and pairs with rich tomato-based sauces. I love it with a chunky Ragu that has mushrooms, diced onion, Lots of basil, oregano, rosemary, and thyme, with a bit of black pepper, chopped, ripe red, and yellow bell pepper, and of course, garlic, and grated hard, Italian cheese. I like to put the uncooked noodles right into the sauce with an extra cup of water. The extra water rehydrates the noodles to al dente, and brings all the flavors together.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 03:15 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
A little off topic here; my new favorite noodle to go with a rich Sunday grave with meatballs, or a great Ragu/Ragout is Cavatapi. It's a corkscrew shaped macaroni and pairs with rich tomato-based sauces. I love it with a chunky Ragu that has mushrooms, diced onion, Lots of basil, oregano, rosemary, and thyme, with a bit of black pepper, chopped, ripe red, and yellow bell pepper, and of course, garlic, and grated hard, Italian cheese. I like to put the uncooked noodles right into the sauce with an extra cup of water. The extra water rehydrates the noodles to al dente, and brings all the flavors together.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I love cavatappi! It's like a turbo corkscrew - different from rotini. I also like gemelli a lot, but it's not always easy to find.
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 08:10 PM   #11
Executive Chef
 
dragnlaw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Waterdown, Ontario
Posts: 4,805
Me too! Cavatappi is also great in a Mac and Cheese! But I had to buy some regular elbow for the spoiled grandkids who looked at the corkskrews and said... WHA! THAT'S NOT MACARONI! (this was my face(s) ....... )

When I first bought some it was called "ScoobyDoo" only saw it about twice so I guess they weren't licensed and had to change. Too bad, kids might have eaten it then!
__________________
Meddle not in the affairs of dragons for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.
dragnlaw is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 08:11 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,207
Linguine is flat
Sgahetti is round
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-18-2021, 10:02 PM   #13
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Katie H's Avatar
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: I live in the Heartland of the United States - Western Kentucky
Posts: 16,269
If you want to get really really crazy, there are about 300 different types of pasta. Love 'em all. Some of the pastas are useful to "hold" sauces, which is a yummy way to enjoy pasta.
__________________
"As a girl I had zero interest in the stove." - Julia Child
This is real inspiration. Look what Julia became!
Katie H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-19-2021, 05:37 AM   #14
Executive Chef
 
larry_stewart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Long Island, New York
Posts: 3,981
Theres a simple dish I make , linguini with Garlic, oil, fresh uncooked tomato and basil and Mozzarella cheese ( sometimes). I usually make garlic croutons to help scoop up the tomatoes that sit at the bottom of the bowl when your finished, kinda like a bruschetta. My family loves it too, and it's often requested when I am invited to family gatherings.

Anyway, first time I had this was at my professors beach house about 30 years ago, after we graduated. I fell in love with the dish ever since, and make I a lo during tomato season, as the quality of the tomatoes is what really drives the dish.

Getting to the point of this thread, occasionally one oof my family members will take it upon themselves to make it on their own for family gatherings, and they often ( if not always ) use regular spaghetti instead of linguini. Im not going to say that its bad, but its is amazing to me how the simple change in pasta shape for the same dish and make such a difference. Maybe its cause I can sense something is different after having it the same way for decades, or maybe its the way the flavors adhere (or don't) to the pasta, or the absorption rate of the sauce, the physical difference of the pasta and how it feels in the mouth.... It just tastes better with the linguini. Maybe Im just a food snob (which I'm not doubting), and being too critical of someone else's attempt to make what I always make.

Theres another dish that I also , Farfalle with garlic, oil spinach and feta cheese. Simple but really good. Another requested dish. I find I can make it with a fusilli type pasta and it works well.

I guess ( at least to me), the bottom line is that you can use pasta's interchangeably with out making a dramatic difference, but some will pick up on it. My family just doesn't get it, so I guess its a ' me thing' .
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2021-04-19 at 6.33.57 AM.jpg
Views:	13
Size:	97.4 KB
ID:	46410  
larry_stewart is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2021, 10:12 AM   #15
Executive Chef
 
Roll_Bones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Southeast US
Posts: 4,706
Costco sells a 6 pack of (3 types) dried pasta. Imported from Italy is what it says. I tried it once when on sale and really liked them.
I am now on my second purchase. I can't recall the style/type they are, but one sounds like Cavatappi mentioned above?
Its a tight corkscrew. Looks like to strands twisted together. Perfect for a Italian style pasta salad.
The one style I will always pass on is the angel hair. I don't like how it boils up and I don't like how it wants to become a solid mass no matter how much butter, oil or sauce you toss it with.
Did I mention I love pasta!

My mother always told me that Mario Lanza died because he ate to much pasta. lol
I assume he was a large man.
Roll_Bones is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2021, 11:42 AM   #16
Executive Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,789
https://thosefoods.com/linguine-vs-spaghetti/
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-20-2021, 04:29 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 25,415
Cavatappi.
Click image for larger version

Name:	image-asset.jpeg
Views:	9
Size:	29.8 KB
ID:	46430
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-21-2021, 02:10 PM   #18
Executive Chef
 
salt and pepper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Montana
Posts: 2,789
[IMG][/IMG]
salt and pepper is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2021, 12:35 PM   #19
Cook
 
Lee Vining's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2021
Location: Calif
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie H View Post
If you want to get really really crazy, there are about 300 different types of pasta. Love 'em all. Some of the pastas are useful to "hold" sauces, which is a yummy way to enjoy pasta.


An Italian deli near us sells imported dry pasta. I can't find anything in the US grocery chains out here that comes anywhere near it in flavor. Has that cool file type texture on it too.
Takes our pasta dishes over the top.
Lee Vining is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-23-2021, 12:38 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 25,524
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Vining View Post


An Italian deli near us sells imported dry pasta. I can't find anything in the US grocery chains out here that comes anywhere near it in flavor. Has that cool file type texture on it too.
Takes our pasta dishes over the top.
My two favourite brands of pasta are made in Italy. I get their whole wheat pasta. It's really good stuff.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
spaghetti

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.