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Old 01-27-2012, 08:46 AM   #21
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I used to be terrible at cooking rice in a pot, almost bought a rice cooker. I watched good eats and Alton explained that you needed less water than the instructions called for, since then my rice has been perfect. I use electric, and the burner on low cooks perfectly, I can even simmer tomato sauce for hours without sticking or burning.

Brown rice, I sometimes buy the boil-in-bag uncle Ben's or Success, mainly because of my poor time management skills in the evening. More than once have I planned on brown rice only to realize I should have started it a 1/2 hour ago
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Old 01-27-2012, 09:02 AM   #22
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I used to be terrible at cooking rice in a pot, almost bought a rice cooker. I watched good eats and Alton explained that you needed less water than the instructions called for, since then my rice has been perfect. I use electric, and the burner on low cooks perfectly, I can even simmer tomato sauce for hours without sticking or burning.

Brown rice, I sometimes buy the boil-in-bag uncle Ben's or Success, mainly because of my poor time management skills in the evening. More than once have I planned on brown rice only to realize I should have started it a 1/2 hour ago :lol:
That's the main reason I like to have cooked rice in the freezer. It was also handy when I served potatoes with supper and found out that my friend doesn't eat potatoes. No problemo - 2 minutes later, she had brown rice to go with her supper.
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Old 01-27-2012, 10:43 AM   #23
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i don't leave the rice steamer out opn the counter, tax lady. my 3 cup unit fits sweetly into a cabinet.
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Old 01-27-2012, 10:53 AM   #24
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i don't leave the rice steamer out opn the counter, tax lady. my 3 cup unit fits sweetly into a cabinet.
I don't have any spare space in any cabinets. I have two Ikea, Ivar shelves in my kitchen and I don't have any spare space on those. Definitely no spare counter space.
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Old 01-27-2012, 11:28 AM   #25
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With the ATK method of washing the rice under hot water until the water runs clear, you lose all the nutrients. "until the water runs clear" should tell you something. Sometimes ATK is more concerned with ease and quickness than with the loss of nutrition.
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Old 01-27-2012, 11:36 AM   #26
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With the ATK method of washing the rice under hot water until the water runs clear, you lose all the nutrients. "until the water runs clear" should tell you something. Sometimes ATK is more concerned with ease and quickness than with the loss of nutrition.
That only applies to enriched white rice to which nutrients have been added, not brown rice.
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Old 01-27-2012, 11:45 AM   #27
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I have never cooked brown rice. But why wouldn't that apply to brown rice also. If you are washing it until the water runs clear, would there not still be a loss of nutrients? Does ATK advise only washing white and not brown rice before it is cooked?
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Old 01-27-2012, 11:50 AM   #28
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Milled white rice often has nutrients added back to it. They put it in a big tumble dryer and add a powder containing vitamin B, iron, etc. You shouldn't wash this type of rice because, like you said, you'll wash off the nutrients.

It's fine to wash brown rice, though. All the nutrients are on the inside of the hull. I've even read that soaking brown rice can make it more nutritious, because it helps activate enzymes and essential amino acids. And of course it also helps cut down the cooking time a little.
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Old 01-27-2012, 12:34 PM   #29
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Milled white rice often has nutrients added back to it. They put it in a big tumble dryer and add a powder containing vitamin B, iron, etc. You shouldn't wash this type of rice because, like you said, you'll wash off the nutrients.

It's fine to wash brown rice, though. All the nutrients are on the inside of the hull. I've even read that soaking brown rice can make it more nutritious, because it helps activate enzymes and essential amino acids. And of course it also helps cut down the cooking time a little.
Thank you.
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Old 01-27-2012, 12:36 PM   #30
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Do you cut down on the amount of water if you soak the brown rice first?
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:26 PM   #31
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Do you cut down on the amount of water if you soak the brown rice first?
Not that I've noticed, but I think I also use a little different ratio of rice to water than some of you. I've seen a couple people in this thread mention using 1 part rice to 2 parts water. I vary the amount of water depending on the type of rice.

For brown rice, I soak 1 cup for an hour in cold water, then drain and rinse it. Then I add 2 1/4 cups water and cook until all the water is evaporated, which can take 40-50 minutes. So maybe I'm adding a little more water and cooking it longer. I should add I don't like rice al dente, or with a lot of "chew", unless it's going to be used for a salad.

Now if I'm making a white rice like basmati, I do it a little different. I soak 1 cup of rice for 30 minutes, and wash and rinse it well. The stuff that makes the water cloudy is starch, and by washing off the starch you get rice that doesn't clump together near as much (nicer for Indian and Middle Eastern type dishes). Then saute the rice in a little oil about 5 minutes before adding 1 1/2 cups water. Cover, cook over very low heat until the water is evaporated.

I do the same as you and make up larger batches about once a week, which I then refrigerate to use with meals throughout the week. I haven't tried freezing, though. I will have to give that a shot.
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:39 PM   #32
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I also saute my rice in a little oil before cooking, I like the results. I've never done a soak though, I do rinse.

Basmati and Jasmine are about the only white rices that I cook now. If you go to an Asian market, they usually have great prices on it compared to the grocery store.
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Old 01-27-2012, 01:58 PM   #33
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I am with you Steve. I don't like al dente anything. I hate veggies that are barely steamed. I want to be able to get my fork into them. I hate eating at a restaurant and have to pick my veggies up with my hands because I can't get my fork into them.
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Old 01-27-2012, 06:34 PM   #34
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Pretty clearly there are a lot of ideas of what people think steamed long grain white rice should be like. The brand distributors obvious think it sounds nice to say it's "fluffy," which I take to mean all grains cooked dry but distinctly intact and not sticking together at all. I don't like it "fluffy" and want it somewhat softer and "forkable." And if it's going to be placed in a bowl before or after the soup goes in, I want it of a consistency that a mass of it will scoop up and hold its shape.

The medium grain rissoto rices need to be able to cook for a time in liquid and still have separate grains, and they're left al dente so they don't clump. The "sticky" part leaves the rice and thickens the liquid.

Tonight, I'm making black rice to get a third night out of some chicken sausage soup because we ran through the cornbread the first two nights. It's soaking right now, because it needs plenty of cooking time anyway. I want to order some South Carolina heirloom gold rice and try it.

I sometimes see a modified rice cooking directions, typically, combine 1 part rice with 4 parts water and simmer for 30 minutes, drain, and leave covered for 15 more minutes. Anyone tried that?
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:06 PM   #35
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The most important elements of cooking any kind of rice are (1) use a pot or pan with a tight fitting lid, and (2) cook it over the lowest possible heat, just enough to ensure production of the steam that cooks the rice.
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:10 PM   #36
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The most important elements of cooking any kind of rice are (1) use a pot or pan with a tight fitting lid, and (2) cook it over the lowest possible heat, just enough to ensure production of the steam that cooks the rice.
I'm not convinced about the tight fitting lid. Or, maybe we define that differently. I don't think the lids on my enamelled cast iron pots fit tightly, but they make perfect brown rice. I have no idea about white rice. I have never cooked it.
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:12 PM   #37
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Thanks for all the advice! I really can't afford a rice cooker, so I'll stick to the old fashioned way. But, its still good to hear advice from all sides! (:
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:14 PM   #38
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I'm not convinced about the tight fitting lid. Or, maybe we define that differently. I don't think the lids on my enamelled cast iron pots fit tightly, but they make perfect brown rice. I have no idea about white rice. I have never cooked it.
A tight fitting lid keeps the steam in. Steam is what cooks the rice. Thus the term "steamed rice." If the steam escapes then the cooking method is compromised. With less steam the heat from below becomes more of a factor, and that direct heat is what toughens and burns rice.
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:41 PM   #39
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I get great results using the directions on the package, in a pot! It's pretty much the same as Taxlady's TNT method. Love brown rice.

As much as I love gadgets, not sure I could find the space for a rice maker.
I'm with you, I just follow the directions on the package and never had a problem!


I used to have a rice cooker but it ended up breaking. I loved it for steamed vegetables and rice but not everyone wants or has room for it. I can definitely live without it but if I gain one again I won't complain.
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Old 01-27-2012, 07:43 PM   #40
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A tight fitting lid keeps the steam in. Steam is what cooks the rice. Thus the term "steamed rice." If the steam escapes then the cooking method is compromised. With less steam the heat from below becomes more of a factor, and that direct heat is what toughens and burns rice.
Yeah, I understand your theory. Did I mention that my rice comes out perfect?

I just don't want anyone to be too deterred from trying to cook brown rice if the lids on their pots aren't all that tight fitting. Yes, you want them snug, but do they have to be tight? And, as mentioned before, maybe we are just arguing about the definition of "tight fitting lid".
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