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Old 12-04-2016, 06:36 AM   #21
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Different pastas complement different dishes due to their shapes and the way they hold the sauce. I want to get comfortable with selecting pastas based on the sauce, as I don't want to be a complete Philistine :P Also, we are considering going to Italy next year, so I don't want to be someone who expects "spaghetti bolognese"
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Old 12-04-2016, 06:58 AM   #22
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What a great list, di. I would love to see the recipe for mussel sauce.
Have you ever had Carrabba's mussels? I love them and have them for my dinner when we go there. They serve it with bread to sop up the sauce but I don't see why it couldn't be on pasta. I found a copycat recipe that's pretty close to it. Carrabbas Mussels Cozze Bianco Recipe - Food.com
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Old 12-04-2016, 07:06 AM   #23
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This is a copycat recipe I came up with from watching a TV show and a couple of internet sites. The original recipe was based on an Italian friend's recipe per the owner, who was in Italy playing cello with an orchestra if I remember correctly. We thought it was pretty good. It's time consuming to make and a bit pricy but makes a LOT. I think we had 3, maybe 4, meals for 2 with tagliatelle and made a batch of ravioli filling (chopped it up finer) as well.

http://www.discusscooking.com/forums...ese-95673.html

The recipe is still kind of a work in progress. I haven't made it again since the first time but in the last couple of weeks have been thinking about tackling it again and making a few of the changes I noted.
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Old 12-04-2016, 08:20 AM   #24
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That Cream, porcini mushrooms and chestnuts sauce caught my eye.
Id love to have the recipe for that if possible.
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Old 12-04-2016, 11:47 AM   #25
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Brown butter and sage sauce, or crushed sausage, aglio olio, and red pepper flakes are two of my "something different" sauces to go with good pasta.
buckytom now that I've seemed to master the brown butter it is my quick "go to" for a lunch (usually). I package my ravioli, dumplings, wontons, etc. in little 'snack' sized zip bags. I can grab 1 or 2 bags and throw the contents in as is.
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Old 12-04-2016, 12:36 PM   #26
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and yummmm again - di , I too would like the Cream, Porcini, Chestnut one.

The one for the mussels sounds divine! I have a pkg of frozen mussels that I've been wondering what to do with!
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Old 12-04-2016, 01:31 PM   #27
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Tagliatelle with cream, mushrooms and chestnuts. Translated from 'Buttalapasta' internet site

A typically autmn dish which is both tasty and easy to prepare. You can use a variety of mushrooms.
You need about 10 - 12 chestnuts (either fresh or dried - translator's note)
A perfect dish for an Autumn Sunday lunch or dinner party, or part of an entire menu based on the use of chestnuts, to hail in the arrival of Autumn. This is the recipe:

200g mixed wild mushrooms
About 10 shelled and cleaned chestnuts (translator's note: I'd opt for dried, a lot less trouble)
250ml fresh cream
1 clove of garlic50g butter
2 tbsp fresh grated parmesan or parmesan to taste
Optional: about 75g cubed smoked bacon

Soften the garlic in the butter (without browning it), remove from the pan. Brown the sliced mushrooms. If the chestnuts are fresh, cook on max in the microwave (score the shell criss-cross first to prevent them exploding), shell and chop roughly. For dried shelled chestnuts, soak and boil then rough chop them. Then add to the pan with the bacon and mushrooms.
When everything is cooked, check for seasoning, and then add the cream to make a sauce. Mix everything well, toss the pasta in, and dust with grated Parmesan to taste. Buon Appetito!

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Old 12-04-2016, 02:38 PM   #28
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Amazing! Thank you again :D
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Old 12-04-2016, 02:39 PM   #29
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That sounds wonderful Di! Thank you
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Old 12-05-2016, 07:49 AM   #30
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Copied di and bunches of Thank You's!!
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Old 02-02-2018, 08:13 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by Suthseaxa View Post
I made tagliatelle last week and it was rather fun. It was also extremely tasty with ragu alla Bolognese. I'd love ti make it again, but I am struggling to come up with any other sauces. Most sources I have suggest ragu alla Bolognese or "a rich meat sauce." Even Marcella Hazan's Essentials of Italian Cooking does not shed much more light on it.

Does anyone here have any suggestions of what can served with tagliatelle? Preferably authentic Italian for the immersion!
I'm italian and live in Italy since I was born so I can help you

It's right that tagliatelle and meat sauces is the best choice.
Further than the typical ragu alla bolognese I suggest: wild boar or deer or duck or rabbit ragu. Another ragu typical of my region is sausage and chicken liver ragu.
Tagliatelle go well also with fish. For example with a white ragu (white ragu means without tomato) of shrimps or sword fish or tuna with a veg of your choice. Also try to use a sauce made of clams and chickpeas, they go very well together.
If you make your own tagliatelle buy a piece of authentic parmigiano reggiano (I know it's expensive in usa but it's another level) and a piece of high quality unsalted butter and just eat them with melted butter and a lot of grated parmigiano (no cream and garlic please! ).
In the spring and summer (when they are seasonal) I cook tagliatelle with a mixed veg sauce using: peas, fava beans, asparagus and cherry tomatoes (finely chopped and just browned with evoo and a couple of cloves of garlic (not minced, browned and removed just to give scent to the dish), parsley.
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Old 02-03-2018, 04:28 AM   #32
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Originally Posted by di reston View Post
List of sauces and 'dressings' for tagiatelle - Buttalapasta site, in italian:

If there's anything in this list that grabs you, let me know - I'll post the recipe-
The recipes are, as they say here, 'italianissi - but then they ARE italian 'Made in Italy DOC':

Swordfish and saffron
White Alba truffle and porcini mushrooms
Cauliflower
Aspargus
Rabbit rag, rabbit sugo
Cream, porcini mushrooms and chestnuts
Sausage and cream
Cream, bacon cubes and peas
mussel sauce
Spinach and salmon
Saffron, lemon and Pecorino Sardo (Sardinian recipe)
Spinach and pumpkin
Baked tomato sauce, mushrooms and bacon cubes
Pesto alla Genovese and other pesto's
Baked with chick peas and mozzarella di bufala (Southern Italy and Sicily)
Green beans and mushrooms
capers and black olives
'Hay and Straw' tagliatelle, butter and grated parmesan (spinach and classic tagliatelle mix, hence 'hay and straw', serve usually with a sugo or a rag

Interesting, eh? They're all simple to make, and pasta is the stand-by food when you're in a hurry or very hungry. Butta la Pasta means 'get the pasta on'

Hope the above list gives you inspiration to experiment and create your own sauce/dressing

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Wow, great list.

Tagiatelle is a big, hearty pasta, so it can take on some rich sauces and big flavors. The ones I highlighted in bold sound really appealing to me.

I love the fact that DC is an international food forum. We get to have our questions about foods around the world answered by people who live in those countries.

CD
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Old 02-04-2018, 10:33 AM   #33
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I'm looking through my collection and references to send for this thread. By, when you say,' are tagliatelle and fettuccine' the same thing , the answer is 'yes'. I'll post some more tomorrow - the kitchen beckons!


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Old 02-06-2018, 09:02 AM   #34
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I'm looking through my collection and references to send for this thread. By, when you say,' are tagliatelle and fettuccine' the same thing , the answer is 'yes'. I'll post some more tomorrow - the kitchen beckons!


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Hello, tagliatelle and fettuccine are not the same thing.
The process and the ingredients are the same, but they are different in width.
We have four terms in relationship with the width (talking about fresh pasta noodles):

tagliolini: 1-2 millimeters
fettuccine: 3-5 millimeters
tagliatelle: 5-10 millimeters
pappardelle: 2-3 centimeters

Talking about dry pasta noodles there are:

spaghetti 5 kind in order of thickness: capelli d'angelo (angel hair), spaghettini, spaghetti, vermicelli, spaghettoni
linguine (flat shaped)
spaghetti alla chitarra (square section)
bucatini (like spaghetti but with a hole)

These are the "national" noodles, but there are also many regional noodles like for example pici (tuscany), mafalde and ziti (campania), sagne 'ncannulate (puglia), fileja (calabria), pizzoccheri (lombardia) and so on

It has been said that we have more or less 150 pasta shapes in Italy (noodles and other shapes)
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Old 02-06-2018, 01:04 PM   #35
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Well! That's interesting! In all the years I've had to do with Italy, I never knew that! Mind you, even though there are different sizes and shapes of pasta, now that I look at it, I'm still going to continue to buy the types of pasta I usually use, otherwise I'd be inundated in it, and if there's anything I really necessary I'll buy as and when. Thank's for the information.

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Old 02-06-2018, 01:53 PM   #36
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I have a thing for fun pasta shapes. I feel like I am a bit inundated with them right now
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Old 02-06-2018, 02:52 PM   #37
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I recently purchased a bag of Monte Pollino fettuccine at costco - and perhaps it should have been more accurately labeled tagliatelle - either way it's wonderful high quality pasta. Nice chew to it.

Click image for larger version

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Last night I made a quick sauce that was just perfect - light enough for the taste of the pasta to shine through and super easy.

Pasta
1 T olive oil
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp fennel seeds
1 can diced tomatoes or crushed
2 T prepared pesto (also from costco)
1/2 t oregano flakes
a few chopped capers
large handful of salad greens (mine were kale, spinach and arugula)
reggiano Parmesan
Cracked pepper

Assemble the ingredients and make the sauce while the water boils

Bring salted water to a boil for pasta and drop the pasta - it will only take about 5 minutes to cook

In skillet:
Sizzle up olive oil with red pepper flakes and fennel seeds for a minute.
Add canned tomatoes, pesto, capers and oregano; mix it up and turn off the heat. Don't cook this down - just heat it through.

When pasta is cooked but not drained: Add the salad greens to the skillet with the sauce, turn burner back on to med.

Use tongs to pull pasta from cooking water into skillet and toss for a minute. If sauce is too tight, add a spoonful of pasta water.

Sprinkle with parm and cracked black pepper.

Click image for larger version

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Old 02-07-2018, 08:26 AM   #38
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Originally Posted by Janet H View Post
I recently purchased a bag of Monte Pollino fettuccine at costco - and perhaps it should have been more accurately labeled tagliatelle - either way it's wonderful high quality pasta. Nice chew to it.

Attachment 29064


Last night I made a quick sauce that was just perfect - light enough for the taste of the pasta to shine through and super easy.

Pasta
1 T olive oil
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/4 tsp fennel seeds
1 can diced tomatoes or crushed
2 T prepared pesto (also from costco)
1/2 t oregano flakes
a few chopped capers
large handful of salad greens (mine were kale, spinach and arugula)
reggiano Parmesan
Cracked pepper

Assemble the ingredients and make the sauce while the water boils

Bring salted water to a boil for pasta and drop the pasta - it will only take about 5 minutes to cook

In skillet:
Sizzle up olive oil with red pepper flakes and fennel seeds for a minute.
Add canned tomatoes, pesto, capers and oregano; mix it up and turn off the heat. Don't cook this down - just heat it through.

When pasta is cooked but not drained: Add the salad greens to the skillet with the sauce, turn burner back on to med.

Use tongs to pull pasta from cooking water into skillet and toss for a minute. If sauce is too tight, add a spoonful of pasta water.

Sprinkle with parm and cracked black pepper.

Attachment 29065
Very nice repice, simple, low in fats but very flavourful, very "italian inspired", especially because there is no cream in it (contrarily to what many people around the world think, cream is almost banned in our cuisine, except in some specific recipes, because it covers too much the rest and damages the sharpness of the flavours).
About pesto, if you can buy fresh basil I always recomend to make it home, it's a one minute job with the mixer and there is no comparison with any bought one. If you cannot buy pine nuts you can subsitute them with almonds. If you cannot buy pecorino you can use parmigiano alone. It's madatory to use evoo.
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:09 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by brasato View Post
Hello, tagliatelle and fettuccine are not the same thing.
The process and the ingredients are the same, but they are different in width.
We have four terms in relationship with the width (talking about fresh pasta noodles):

tagliolini: 1-2 millimeters
fettuccine: 3-5 millimeters
tagliatelle: 5-10 millimeters
pappardelle: 2-3 centimeters

Talking about dry pasta noodles there are:

spaghetti 5 kind in order of thickness: capelli d'angelo (angel hair), spaghettini, spaghetti, vermicelli, spaghettoni
linguine (flat shaped)
spaghetti alla chitarra (square section)
bucatini (like spaghetti but with a hole)

These are the "national" noodles, but there are also many regional noodles like for example pici (tuscany), mafalde and ziti (campania), sagne 'ncannulate (puglia), fileja (calabria), pizzoccheri (lombardia) and so on

It has been said that we have more or less 150 pasta shapes in Italy (noodles and other shapes)
Here in the U.S. the dried pasta labeled tagliatelle is a nest around 3 - 4 inches in diameter (at least the tagliatelle I have seen in supermarkets). Fettuccine is sold as straight noodles. I haven't measured them, but they appear to be about the same width. Pappardelle is far wider.

I rummaged around the internet and came across the following:

"As I learned during my trip to Casa Buitoni in Tuscany (among other things, like how to make pasta from scratch), this popular cut of pasta is named two different things based on region. It's called fettuccine in Rome and Southern Italy, and it's referred to as tagliatelle in the Northern regions of Italy. But it's the exact same thing!"

https://www.popsugar.com/food/Differ...telle-41945041

According to Wikipedia:

"Fettuccine is a type of pasta popular in Roman and Tuscan cuisine. It is a flat thick pasta made of egg and flour (usually one egg for every 100 g of flour), wider than but similar to the tagliatelle typical of Bologna."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fettuccine

No wonder us non-Italians are confused!
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:17 PM   #40
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I've had boar in a tomato sauce with tagliatelle before, and it was fantastic. The thicker pasta was a good match for the hearty l, gamey meat.

It was at a now defunct Italian restaurant on W 56th and 9th. My wife would always ask to go there no matter where we were in the city, lol, because their pastas were that good.

The last time we went was when my boy was just about 2 or 3 years old. We asked for the table in the corner where it was floor to ceiling windows looking out on the traffic of 9th ave. It kept the little guy busy between bites looking at all of the traffic.
Well, he ate his pasta with his hands ($20 for a plate of spaghetti with a little bit of sauce for a baby? ) and then he proceeded to put his saucy hands all over the windows trapped between us on either side, announcing every taxi, police car, or horse drawn carriage that went slowly by.

There was overpriced soaghetti on the floor, on the seats, and saucy little hand prints all over the windows.

I think I left about a 35 or 40% tip that night as we hurried out to our car.
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