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Old 05-19-2005, 11:31 AM   #1
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What kind of rice for rositto?

I am going to try to make rositto for the first time. What kind of rice should I use and where do I buy it? I looked at my local super market and all I could find was long grain or calrose. Thanks .

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Old 05-19-2005, 11:34 AM   #2
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You want a short grain rice. It is usually labeled risotto, but not always. I find it right in my regular supermarket with the other rices.
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Old 05-19-2005, 11:35 AM   #3
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The type of rice you use is pretty important, as it needs to be the high starch type that gives off the starch to create risotto's creamy texture.



Look for Arborio or Carnaroli rice, which are the types most often used in risotto and are widely found in the US.

Arborio is easiest to find. They carry it in my supermarket in both the rice and the italian sections.
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Old 05-19-2005, 11:38 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema
Look for Arborio
LOL I knew I forgot to type something else. Thanks for getting my back Jenny
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Old 05-19-2005, 01:21 PM   #5
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Quote:
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LOL I knew I forgot to type something else. Thanks for getting my back Jenny
You're welcome, but I typed mine before I saw yours!!

And you are right in that sometimes it's actually labeled "risotto." If it is, just make sure it's arborio rice in the package.

Look for it near basamati and jasmine rices.
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Old 05-19-2005, 08:18 PM   #6
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Thanks everyone. I looked a little harder at my local store and I did find it. Maybe I'll cook it this weekend.
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Old 05-20-2005, 05:14 AM   #7
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You actually don't even have to use arborio rice, or any other designated risotto-type rice. I've used short-grain calrose white rice to make risotto and most people can't tell the difference. The main thing is technique. Mostly all short grain rices have enough starch to make a decent risotto. It's the long grain rice that you can't use.
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Old 05-20-2005, 11:23 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by ironchef
You actually don't even have to use arborio rice, or any other designated risotto-type rice. I've used short-grain calrose white rice to make risotto and most people can't tell the difference. The main thing is technique. Mostly all short grain rices have enough starch to make a decent risotto. It's the long grain rice that you can't use.

I had heard this and used calrose once and I could for sure tell a difference. Maybe I'm picky but it just wasn't right, IMO.

But you are right in that TECHNIQUE is very important.
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Old 07-24-2018, 02:42 AM   #9
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Yes, short grain rice, but which work and which don’t

Quote:
Originally Posted by jennyema View Post
The type of rice you use is pretty important, as it needs to be the high starch type that gives off the starch to create risotto's creamy texture.

Look for Arborio or Carnaroli rice, which are the types most often used in risotto and are widely found in the US.

Arborio is easiest to find. They carry it in my supermarket in both the rice and the italian sections.
I’m sure there are many “versions” of short grain rice. I’d never even heard of Carnaroli (not surprising). Japanese “sushi rice” is short grain, very starchy, and has a pleasant understated sweetness. How different is it from Arborio, and how is it different? If I did try to use sushi rice instead of Arborio rice, what, if any, modifications would I need to make in the cooking of the risotto. I know that in many Japanese “hot pot” recipes, after all of the protein and veggies have been devoured, it is customary to add a final twist by adding either noodles, which go well with the broth from beef and pork hot pots, or cooked rice, which is favored with seafood and/or chicken hot pots. The latter is added to the broth, brought back to a simmer, then covered and gently cooked until the rice has all but melted into a pudding consistency. Adding some soy sauce and beaten egg (about 1 for every 2 people served) and topping the whole thing with scallions, white and green parts, is customary.

Risotto, on the other hand… Well, you all know the differences between a classic risotto and the Japanese porridge-like “after course.” I think the main differences are sautéing the uncooked rice before adding liquid for the risotto, and a much higher water content in the Japanese porridge, versus the slow addition of liquid and constant stirring required for a classic risotto.

If I treated my Japanese rice the same as I treat my Arborio rice, it would behave like Arborio rice?

I am researching this, but a discussion would be much more engaging and interesting than the standard websites; and this is the best place I know for the not-quite-real-time discussions that happen, even regarding subjects that have been hashed and rehashed. So indulge me, please? Share with me your relationship with the many variations of risotto. And if you’ve ever tried to make it with sushi rice. In the meantime, I’m gonna try it, what’s to lose, right? A cup of rice, a lttle wine?
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Old 07-24-2018, 10:09 AM   #10
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I'd head right to the stove for a test run.

The key to making a creamy risotto, in addition to using a short grain rice, is frequent stirring. That frees the starch to mix with the liquid and make a thick creamy 'sauce' for the rice.
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Old 07-24-2018, 11:09 AM   #11
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I make risotto in the rice cooker with Arborio rice. I've never had nonna made risotto, so I can't compare, but it is equal to the risotto I've had in good Italian restaurants. My rice cooker has a porridge setting, and that is what I use.

https://www.thespruceeats.com/how-to...-cooker-909024

I'm going to give the Wolfgang Puck method a try one of these days:

https://www.cleveland.com/food/index...r_rice_co.html

Seriouseats has a number of articles / recipes on risotto that don't require constant stirring.
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Old 07-24-2018, 03:19 PM   #12
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Well, there are literally hundreds of different types of rice cultivated in Italy. In addition, you can buy 4 year aged rice varieties. Most of the rice produced in Italy is raised all along the Po Valley, and the flat rice fields stretch for miles in every direction. The rice fields are cultivated in squares, each divided by the ditches that flood them. It comes as no surprise that they are known as 'the chequered sea'. It comes as no surprise that the most cultivated types of rice are: Arborio (risotto) Vialone Nano (risotto and soups) Carnaroli (the king of them all) Baldo and Roma. There are types of rice that are more suited to other dishes, such as supplì (rice croquettes, and a great favourite of the citizens of Rome) and Arancini, a great favourite street food beloved of southern Italians and Sicilians. Some rice varieties hold more starch than others, and other types, less starchy hold better in soups etc. The types of rice I indicated above are the ones most used. Apologies if I've harped on about things you already know!

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Old 07-24-2018, 03:33 PM   #13
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Well, there are literally hundreds of different types of rice cultivated in Italy. In addition, you can buy 4 year aged rice varieties. Most of the rice produced in Italy is raised all along the Po Valley, and the flat rice fields stretch for miles in every direction. The rice fields are cultivated in squares, each divided by the ditches that flood them. It comes as no surprise that they are known as 'the chequered sea'. It comes as no surprise that the most cultivated types of rice are: Arborio (risotto) Vialone Nano (risotto and soups) Carnaroli (the king of them all) Baldo and Roma. There are types of rice that are more suited to other dishes, such as supplì (rice croquettes, and a great favourite of the citizens of Rome) and Arancini, a great favourite street food beloved of southern Italians and Sicilians. Some rice varieties hold more starch than others, and other types, less starchy hold better in soups etc. The types of rice I indicated above are the ones most used. Apologies if I've harped on about things you already know!

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Quite the contrary Di!! I for one, learned 100% more than I knew before about rice in Italy. Many thanks.
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Old 07-25-2018, 06:21 AM   #14
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This thread aroused my curiosity, and I rummaged around the internet for more information. I never knew there are 8,000 varieties of rice. Here are a few links for those interested.

A brief history of rice in Italy:

Italia, Europe’s Rice Paddy

An article from seriouseats about a rice farm in Italy:

https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/07/...tory-tour.html

A video of a rice farm:

The rice fields of the Po valley | Reizen langs Rivieren Travelling along Rivers

And finally, an article from thekitchn for us Yanks in selecting rice for risotto. I'm going to have to keep an eye out for carnaroli when shopping.

https://www.thekitchn.com/the-best-t...risotto-215630
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Old 07-25-2018, 03:16 PM   #15
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Novara, which is nearer to Milan, is the other main producer of quality rice. For the conaisseur, aged rice is highly sought after.

I'm delighted that your interest in the subject was awakened! And your information excellent.

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Old 07-26-2018, 12:40 PM   #16
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What kind of rice for rossitto

The following is Heston Blumenthal's recipe for Risotto alla Milanese.

It's very interesting and well worth reading - and I have a feeling that Tenspeed will enjoy this:

150g best quality Arborio rice, preferably aged for 4 years.
1/2 medium white onion and a small clove garlice finely chopped
A pinch of saffron strands
2" cube of butter
White wine to cover the rice at the beginning
1 pint white stock (recipe below)
2 tbsp best quality Parmesan cheese - definitely not grated and out of a packet. Get a proper piece and grated it yourself. Makes all the difference.

Melt the butter on a low heat. Add the onions and garlic and sizzle gently until transparent and the liquid from the butter has evaporated. Add the rice and the saffron.

The stock:

You will need 2 - 3 chicken legs and thighs, skin on. 1 tsp salt Bring to the boil, remove the chicken and strain through a chinois. Return to pan, adding a soffritto of onions, carrots and celery and fresh crushed garlic, 1 large. Bouquet garni optional. Boil down until the stock is ready.

Assembling the dish:

Add the rice to the onions and garlic and sizzle gently until the rice is transparent. Add the saffron. gently heat to get the starch out. When this is done - 5-10 mins - 5 - 10 mins., over a low heat add white wine just to cover the rice. Evaporate the alcohol and reduce. Then start adding the stock, just to cover the rice. Then reduce the wine to get rid of the alcohol. Then start adding the stock, enough to just the rice each time. Stir until it is all absorbed. At that point, add more stock a little at a time, so that you get a creamy consistency at the finish. Stir in the parmesan cheese and serve.

Note that may or may not be of interest: In Milan's top restaurants, Risotto alla Milanese is generally garnished with pure gold leaf!


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Old 07-26-2018, 04:54 PM   #17
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The following is Heston Blumenthal's recipe for Risotto alla Milanese.

It's very interesting and well worth reading - and I have a feeling that Tenspeed will enjoy this:
I like everything except the stirring part. One of these days I may make risotto the traditional way, just to give it a try. In the meanwhile I'll continue to make faux risotto in the rice cooker. It doesn't take much work, I can ignore it once I hit the start button, and the machine keeps me from screwing it up.

I got a chuckle out of Kenji's comment on the need to stir risotto:

Old-fashioned risotto recipes recommend you stir constantly with a wooden spoon. I sincerely believe that this technique was born out of Italian grandmothers wanting to keep little bambini occupied for half an hour. I've found that you can easily get away with adding almost all the liquid at once and only stirring it a couple times during cooking.

https://www.seriouseats.com/2017/04/...s-risotto.html
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Old 07-26-2018, 06:56 PM   #18
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I’m wondering if I can use Japanese short grain rice (sushi rice) to make risotto. My main concern is that Japanese rice must be washed several times. I don’t think I need to actually soak it for thirty minutes, as one does when actually making rice for sushi, but the washing, as I understand it, is required. Can one sauté wet rice? Or do I need to wash the rice, then spread it on a baking sheet to dry? And just how dry does it need to be?
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Old 07-27-2018, 09:16 AM   #19
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I’m wondering if I can use Japanese short grain rice (sushi rice) to make risotto. My main concern is that Japanese rice must be washed several times. I don’t think I need to actually soak it for thirty minutes, as one does when actually making rice for sushi, but the washing, as I understand it, is required. Can one sauté wet rice? Or do I need to wash the rice, then spread it on a baking sheet to dry? And just how dry does it need to be?
Speaking only to that in bold, I saute wet rice when making Spanish rice and pilaf.. Works well for me..


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Old 07-27-2018, 11:23 AM   #20
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Can one sauté wet rice? Or do I need to wash the rice, then spread it on a baking sheet to dry? And just how dry does it need to be?
You can sauté wet rice. It will take a little longer than dry rice because the water has to evaporate before the rice can start toasting, but it's not a significant amount of time.
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