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Old 11-19-2005, 02:45 AM   #21
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It's easy to find the ingredients here. There are a few asian shops in Geneva and some african shops too. Importantly there is a shop owned by a Tanzanian. That's where I get all the other stuff I cannot get from the asian shops.A lot of the spices are also readily available in most supermarkets here anyway.
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Old 11-22-2005, 10:58 AM   #22
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Prawns Mozambique

Prawns
Peanut oil,
Hot peppers or red pepper flakes
Lemon juice( a tbspoon at least)
Garlic cloves(crushed)
Finely chopped dhania(fresh coriander)

Mix up all the ingredients(every ingredient should be according to your taste, I try and go easy on the hot peppers as too much means I won't be able too taste the prawns) and fry. Serve with rice or whatever you wish. I have tried it with pasta and it worked fine.
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Old 11-22-2005, 11:16 AM   #23
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That's a lovely recipe for prawns, sizzles!! I love prawns and when I cook them I like it keeping it simple... when you put too much stuff the delicate flavour of prawns tend to get drowned... it's like a variation of our favourite, cooked with butter, garlic and parsley!
We finally tried the gari (cassava flakes) just the other day, it did came out almost like polenta!! I made the Nyama keema, we skipped the clove (we didn't have any!!) and used sour cream instead of yogurt (all we had was strawberry flavoured!! somehow I didn't think it would go over well with the sauce ) but it came out delicious!!
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Old 11-22-2005, 03:26 PM   #24
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^That's what I love about cooking...improvisation. Having said that, I wouldn't be tempted to use strawberry yorgurt...but maybe I should try, one never knows until they try. I can't promise that I will use strawberry yorgurt this year., so you just have to wait a long while until I get over the fact that the only yorgurt I love is natural.
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Old 11-22-2005, 03:42 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urmaniac13
That's a lovely recipe for prawns, sizzles!! I love prawns and when I cook them I like it keeping it simple... when you put too much stuff the delicate flavour of prawns tend to get drowned... it's like a variation of our favourite, cooked with butter, garlic and parsley!
We finally tried the gari (cassava flakes) just the other day, it did came out almost like polenta!! I made the Nyama keema, we skipped the clove (we didn't have any!!) and used sour cream instead of yogurt (all we had was strawberry flavoured!! somehow I didn't think it would go over well with the sauce ) but it came out delicious!!
I love prawns way too much. I would love to try your prawn recipes. I have a few myself and would share willingly.
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Old 12-01-2005, 10:57 AM   #26
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Maandazi

This is more like a Kenyan doughnut(goes great with tea kenyan style...brewed)
2 cups plain flour
3 tbs sugar
1 cup coconut milk
1 tsp corasely ground cardamom
A tsp dry yeast, and oil for frying

Mix all the ingredients with cocnut milk and bind them into a dough and knead the dough(add water if neccessary or flour if it still sticks to the side of the mixing bowl. The dough is ready only when you can lift it off the bowl without it trying hard too to stay there!)leave the dough in a warm place covered for 2 to 3 hours for it to rise. Then roll out the dough and cut intoo whatever shapes using cookie cutters and deep fry in hot oil on both sides.

Can be eaten hot or cold.I usually cook maandazi once a month and keep in an airtight container for at least a week, after that they go hard. Kenyan style tea is basically half milk half water, sugar and tea leaves, slowly brewed until it nearly boils over, then strained, and the tea leaves thrown away.and served piping hot(I can never stand adding cold milkk to my tea, it just makes it cold!
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Old 12-02-2005, 08:33 PM   #27
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African here. Not alot of Africans on English language food forums.
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Algerian Recipes and Photos

https://bookofrai.com
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Old 12-04-2005, 09:28 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by farid
African here. Not alot of Africans on English language food forums.
Hi Farid, hard to understand why there are not many africans on the english language food forums considering that from Kenya down to southern africa, english is used, it's only in some West African countries that French is the official language, and Northern African using Arabic. Oh well, great to read recipes from Algeria. I will check out more recipes from the website, and try them out.thanks for the web address.
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Old 12-04-2005, 09:36 AM   #29
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Pilau Wa Kuku (chicken Pilau)

margarine
1 small onion chopped
1 tsp cumin seeds
1 tsp black peppercorns, whole
several whole cloves
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp cardamon powder
crushed ginger
crushed garlic
3 sliced tomatoes
2 potato, cubed
several pieces of chicken pieces(on the bone)
4 tbsp dhania, chopped


Method:

In a medium saucepan, melt the margarine and fry the onion until golden. Add all the spices and the salt. Stir fry for 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes, potato, and chicken, and mix everything together well. Wash the rice and add it in stirring gently to combine with other ingredients. Finally add in the dhania and and fry for about 3 mins and then pour in the water. Cover and bring to the boil. Lower the heat. Uncover and cook until the liquid evaporates. Cover and cook for 20 minutes on very low heat to allow it to steam.
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Old 12-07-2005, 08:22 AM   #30
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This is another lovely dish with touch of India... I bet if you and Yakuta could get together you guys will be able to concoct some stupendous aromatic menu!!
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Old 12-07-2005, 09:29 AM   #31
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Hi Sizzles and Urmaniac, I actually have family who was born and raised in Dar es salaam (Tanzania). My grandparents were originally from there (several generations ago). My two sister in laws were also born there and came to the US when they were relatively young but they still have that influence in their cooking.

One of my elderly aunts and her daughter still cook African food when we visit them in Atlanta. I love a lot of the dishes and my aunt truly is a good cook and one that is totally into fusion between African and Indian cooking.

I have to say Mandazi is one of my absolute favorite along with fried Yucca sprinkled with some lemon juice, salt and red chilli powder. I love everything with coconut. My aunt also makes a mashed yucca with coconut milk. It's a more exotic version of the mashed potato they pronounce it as "Moghu" and although a little bland for me is still really a great side dish with goat or chicken curry and roti.
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Old 12-07-2005, 10:22 AM   #32
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Yakuta, yes, bring in the maandazi's. My kids love them, I make them almost every week. Sambusas (samosas)are another thing loved by my family.Btw yakuta, have you ever tried coconut chapatis?
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Old 12-07-2005, 11:24 AM   #33
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Hi Sizzles no, I have not tried coconut chappati's but if you share your recipe I will give it a try.

I do make a variety of chappati's - some seasoned with chopped cilantro, minced onions, whole jeera seeds and curry powder. I add these ingredients to plain flour and then make a dough by adding water. I then roll them and dry roast them and then serve them with plain yogurt and pickle.

I also make stuffed parathas with potatoes (Aaloo) and radishes (Muli). So the coconut one will be a good one to add to this already long list
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Old 12-07-2005, 11:37 AM   #34
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Yes, Maandazi sounds reeeaally delicious... I love cardamom in my curries and salads, never thought of using it in a sweet!! You know it is just like a variation with coconut milk of castagnole, traditional Italian sweet treats for the carnival period(we have so many different sweet treats for this period... almost as bad as Christmas!!). Next time we must make this version as well at the same time... carnival period is not so far away when you think about it!!
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Old 12-08-2005, 11:22 AM   #35
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Yakuta, for the coconut milk chapatis, instead of water, you use coconut milk.Urmaniac13, I am making some tomorrow, shall I put some in the post for you? I think the postman might eat them!
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Old 12-08-2005, 12:17 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sizzles
Yakuta, for the coconut milk chapatis, instead of water, you use coconut milk.Urmaniac13, I am making some tomorrow, shall I put some in the post for you? I think the postman might eat them!
Yes, pleeeeease!! Just write on the package "toxic" !!
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Old 12-13-2005, 10:15 AM   #37
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Chapati

Chapatis or Chappatis (singular Chapati or Chappati) are round, flat, unleavened bread common in West Asia, particularly India. They are also popular in Eastern Africa, especially among the Swahili people at the coast.We used to have this on special days, Christmas is never Christmas without chapati and chicken stew. I could never convince my mum that turkey is ok and we don't have to have chapati.

2 cups flour
Water(or coconut milk)
1 teaspoon salt
Oil (or butter)
Cooking Instructions:

Sift flour and salt into a bowl. Add enough water to make a fairly stiff dough. Knead well. Roll out on a floured board into a fairly thick circle. Brush with oil. From the centre of the circle, make a cut to one edge. Roll up dough into a cone, press both ends in, and make a ball again. Repeat that process 2-3 more times. Divide dough into 4 or 5 balls, and roll each out into a thin circle. Heat a frying pan over moderate heat and dry out each chapati in the pan quickly. Brush pan with oil and fry chapati slowly until golden brown on each side. Serve hot or cold with stew.
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Old 12-20-2005, 10:51 AM   #38
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Kenyan Goat stew

Ingredients:


Goat meat cut into small pieces
Tomato puree(to thicken the stew)
An onion
Fresh tomatoes
crushed garlic
Dhania
Salt to taste


Method:
Fry onions in pot until translucent, add meat and keep frying, add tomatoes, then all the other ingredients and let simmer until the meat is ready.Serve with rice, ugali or chapati.This is the original version of goat stew, I make my own additions to it, like lets say curry powder, or coconut milk or thicken the stew even more with flour etc etc.
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Old 12-20-2005, 11:00 AM   #39
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In Zimbabwe, South Africa and Namibia, this is a very common dish, and one of it's names is "stywe pap" and, if it's more dry and crumbly, "krimmel pap" (my spelling is probably wrong).

It's served the same way as you describe. I make this often when we have a bbq, and serve it as a side dish accompanied by a sauce made of sauteed onion and fresh cut up tomatoes. Sometimes I put some corn (frozen or canned (w/out the juices)) in it, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sizzles
Maize (White Corn Flour) about 2 cups
Water
Salt (Optional)


Bring water in a pan to a boil (about 4 Cups). Reduce heat to medium and put flour, gradually stirring until the consistency is stiff. Stir continuously, and cover for about 5 minutes. Stir again and form into a mound. The Ugali will be done when it pulls from the sides of the pan easily and does not stick. The finished product should look like stiff grits. Cover the pot with a plate and invert the pan so that the Ugali "drops" on the plate. Serve with stew.
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Old 12-20-2005, 11:16 AM   #40
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It's interesting because a few days ago, I went to an African cultural night and they had a similar 'pap' thing from Nigeria.I am curious how many countries in Africa have the same sort of thing all in a different name.
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